Dragon Eyes Reviews

  • Jun 15, 2020

    I thought the story was weak and the characters uninteresting.

    I thought the story was weak and the characters uninteresting.

  • Oct 23, 2018

    Great action and everyone gets what they deserve in the end. Van Damme and Cung Le do a great job especially since I have never heard of Cung Le.

    Great action and everyone gets what they deserve in the end. Van Damme and Cung Le do a great job especially since I have never heard of Cung Le.

  • Feb 09, 2017

    An annoying, loud action movie with nothing interesting to say.

    An annoying, loud action movie with nothing interesting to say.

  • Apr 12, 2016

    This was a fairly watchable little action flick that I picked up cheap, and I got the $3 worth of enjoyment out of it, so no harm, no foul. A newly arrived stranger sets out to clean up the run-down neighborhood in which he has settled, whcih is about all you need to know. It's got some pretty decent martial arts scenes, though the oddly disjointed narrative technique is a bit distracting. Rental?

    This was a fairly watchable little action flick that I picked up cheap, and I got the $3 worth of enjoyment out of it, so no harm, no foul. A newly arrived stranger sets out to clean up the run-down neighborhood in which he has settled, whcih is about all you need to know. It's got some pretty decent martial arts scenes, though the oddly disjointed narrative technique is a bit distracting. Rental?

  • Feb 21, 2016

    The story is Fine , only not enough JCVD ....he learns Hong the moves of Marterial Arts etc ...And Cung Le is an oke Chinese Actor for me ...most of them i don't like ! SOMDVD

    The story is Fine , only not enough JCVD ....he learns Hong the moves of Marterial Arts etc ...And Cung Le is an oke Chinese Actor for me ...most of them i don't like ! SOMDVD

  • Jan 13, 2016

    Please don't watch this

    Please don't watch this

  • Apr 12, 2015

    As a big fan of Jean-Claude Van Damme and curious about the fighting skills of Cung Le, Dragon Eyes peaked my interest. Though I was curious about Dragon Eyes, I was well aware from the beginning that it was a direct-to-DVD action film from Jean-Claude Van Damme's later years and so my standards were not that high. I must say that I find myself both disappointed with Dragon Eyes in certain respects while impressed with it in others. The story in Dragon Eyes is not one worth bothering about since it is a generic tale of cleaning gang violence off the streets with martial arts, combining the tropes of basic martial arts movies with a familiar vigilante story. This is fun at times, but it is not consistent with taking the right approach. The film is clearly aware of its simplistic elements since it does not try to hide the thin nature of everything, but at the same time it takes itself a bit too seriously at times. Essentially, any time the film is not focused on the action, Dragon Eyes spends time telling a story packed with a surplus of pointless characters and a script which only carries the worth of some occasional comic value for its ridiculous nature. The style of the film remains consistent throughout all of this, but since the film is a low-budget production there is only a meandering distance that it can effectively carry everything through the extensive periods of generic plotting and thin dialogue which lack the action to keep things going while the rest of the feature takes itself a bit too seriously. Still, what the success of Dragon Eyes really boils down to is the nature of the film as an action movie. John Hyams proved his worth with directing gimmicky direct-to-DVD action films when he helmed the previous Jean-Claude Van Damme vehicle Universal Soldier: Regeneration. You can tell that he brings a lot of the same elements over to Dragon Eyes, for better and for worse. On the negative side of things, Jean-Claude Van Damme's role in the story is once again very diminutive despite the film being marketed as an action vehicle of his. This is the primary downfall of Dragon Eyes, more so than the generic narrative. However, this does not stand in the way of John Hyams ensuring that there is solid action at the heart of the experience. His sense of style proves once again that it brings out a solid level of dramatic effect for a direct-to-DVD B-movie. Though clearly a simplistic visual technique, the slight touch of grey to the overall colour scheme in Dragon Eyes effectively adds a sense of grim atmosphere to the story which automatically makes the film a touch more gritty. This adds to every scene in the film nicely and makes the already effective scenery of the film seem all the more grim. But of course the most important visual experience of the film is dependent on the quality of the action. Peter Hyams makes another solid impression with strong B-movie action. The editing can be a tiny bit jolted on occasion, but it is never to the point that the film is impossible to comprehend. It's actually pretty easy to adjust to, and it doesn't stand in the way of viewers embracing the powerful action choreography. But more impressively, other scenes in the film make use of extensive shots which do not need any editing to illuminate the powerful action. In a world where editing plagues mainstream action films by burying comprehension beneath a demand for PG-13 violence, Dragon Eyes stands out for its genuine sense of dedication to entertaining action junkies and the fact that it is not afraid to use a sensibly moderated touch of blood and gore to illuminate it all. On top of all that, the use of slow-motion in the film is actually pretty effective because of its high definition and how it is moderated to be used during some of the most intense moments of the action scenes. But while I talk so intensively about how the technical characteristics of Dragon Eyes enhance the action, the simple fact is that choreography is responsible for carrying it to successful lengths. With a talented cast of performers matched up against Cung Le, the fight scenes in Dragon Eyes make a serious impression. The shootouts and other action scenes have their charms, but the fight scenes in the film are just genuinely very strong which pays a lot of credibility to both Peter Hyams' eye for imagery and the talents of Cung Le, as well as Jean-Claude Van Damme to a lesser extent. Dragon Eyes really needs to be considered as a vehicle for Cung Le because he is the true hero of the story. Well enough, he proves to justify his existence very nicely. Cung Le proves his worth as a martial artist very well in Dragon Eyes. His first extensive fight scene in the film shows him delivering a variety of swift and creative techniques which pack a strong punch and look genuinely awesome, and he carries this consistently over the course of the entire film with a genuine passion for the fight scenes. Dragon Eyes is perhaps the first time I have seen a movie with Jean-Claude Van Damme where someone else makes a greater impression for jump kicks than him, and Cung Le delivers an incredibly solid effort in doing so while delivering every hook punch and elbow with flawless strength. He isn't given that much of a character and his dramatic charisma is subtle, but in the face of such impressive fight skills I hardly noticed for a second. I felt that Dragon Eyes was an eye opener for me as I walk away from the film with a desire to see more Cung Le movies, so his ambitions were certainly successful in reaching an action junkie like me. Cung Le is definitely the best part about Dragon Eyes, and single handily makes the experience incredibly worthwhile. Jean-Claude Van Damme has very little time on screen, and when he does the only thing he really has to do is punch Cung Le or deliver generic dialogue without a hint of emotional involvement or even a sense of volume about him. It is very much a waste of his talents since he clearly has so much potential, and so fans of his may find disappointment with Dragon Eyes. However, as the man has gotten older, his physical appearance matches the subtle nature of his line delivery and puts a sense of wisdom into the character which puts an entirely different gimmick on him. As a hardcore fan of the man I am very biased in my opinion of his role in the film, but I found that his effort to play the master who trains the protagonist was factually a good turn for him. Jean-Claude Van Damme's presence is welcome as always, and though his role in the film is overstated by the promotional material he still makes a memorable cause by being around and working effectively with Cung Le during the training sequences which does deliver a certain sense of satisfaction in lieu of heavy Van-Damage. And even though he gets less screen time than Jean-Claude Van Damme, the presence of Peter Weller is welcome for the cult movie fans likely to find joy in the experience. So while the story takes itself a bit too seriously at times and there is too little Jean-Claude Van Damme, Dragon Eyes transcends the standards of direct-to-DVD action films by boasting more of the impressive action scenes Peter Hyams is able to capture and an incredible array of fight skills from Cung Le.

    As a big fan of Jean-Claude Van Damme and curious about the fighting skills of Cung Le, Dragon Eyes peaked my interest. Though I was curious about Dragon Eyes, I was well aware from the beginning that it was a direct-to-DVD action film from Jean-Claude Van Damme's later years and so my standards were not that high. I must say that I find myself both disappointed with Dragon Eyes in certain respects while impressed with it in others. The story in Dragon Eyes is not one worth bothering about since it is a generic tale of cleaning gang violence off the streets with martial arts, combining the tropes of basic martial arts movies with a familiar vigilante story. This is fun at times, but it is not consistent with taking the right approach. The film is clearly aware of its simplistic elements since it does not try to hide the thin nature of everything, but at the same time it takes itself a bit too seriously at times. Essentially, any time the film is not focused on the action, Dragon Eyes spends time telling a story packed with a surplus of pointless characters and a script which only carries the worth of some occasional comic value for its ridiculous nature. The style of the film remains consistent throughout all of this, but since the film is a low-budget production there is only a meandering distance that it can effectively carry everything through the extensive periods of generic plotting and thin dialogue which lack the action to keep things going while the rest of the feature takes itself a bit too seriously. Still, what the success of Dragon Eyes really boils down to is the nature of the film as an action movie. John Hyams proved his worth with directing gimmicky direct-to-DVD action films when he helmed the previous Jean-Claude Van Damme vehicle Universal Soldier: Regeneration. You can tell that he brings a lot of the same elements over to Dragon Eyes, for better and for worse. On the negative side of things, Jean-Claude Van Damme's role in the story is once again very diminutive despite the film being marketed as an action vehicle of his. This is the primary downfall of Dragon Eyes, more so than the generic narrative. However, this does not stand in the way of John Hyams ensuring that there is solid action at the heart of the experience. His sense of style proves once again that it brings out a solid level of dramatic effect for a direct-to-DVD B-movie. Though clearly a simplistic visual technique, the slight touch of grey to the overall colour scheme in Dragon Eyes effectively adds a sense of grim atmosphere to the story which automatically makes the film a touch more gritty. This adds to every scene in the film nicely and makes the already effective scenery of the film seem all the more grim. But of course the most important visual experience of the film is dependent on the quality of the action. Peter Hyams makes another solid impression with strong B-movie action. The editing can be a tiny bit jolted on occasion, but it is never to the point that the film is impossible to comprehend. It's actually pretty easy to adjust to, and it doesn't stand in the way of viewers embracing the powerful action choreography. But more impressively, other scenes in the film make use of extensive shots which do not need any editing to illuminate the powerful action. In a world where editing plagues mainstream action films by burying comprehension beneath a demand for PG-13 violence, Dragon Eyes stands out for its genuine sense of dedication to entertaining action junkies and the fact that it is not afraid to use a sensibly moderated touch of blood and gore to illuminate it all. On top of all that, the use of slow-motion in the film is actually pretty effective because of its high definition and how it is moderated to be used during some of the most intense moments of the action scenes. But while I talk so intensively about how the technical characteristics of Dragon Eyes enhance the action, the simple fact is that choreography is responsible for carrying it to successful lengths. With a talented cast of performers matched up against Cung Le, the fight scenes in Dragon Eyes make a serious impression. The shootouts and other action scenes have their charms, but the fight scenes in the film are just genuinely very strong which pays a lot of credibility to both Peter Hyams' eye for imagery and the talents of Cung Le, as well as Jean-Claude Van Damme to a lesser extent. Dragon Eyes really needs to be considered as a vehicle for Cung Le because he is the true hero of the story. Well enough, he proves to justify his existence very nicely. Cung Le proves his worth as a martial artist very well in Dragon Eyes. His first extensive fight scene in the film shows him delivering a variety of swift and creative techniques which pack a strong punch and look genuinely awesome, and he carries this consistently over the course of the entire film with a genuine passion for the fight scenes. Dragon Eyes is perhaps the first time I have seen a movie with Jean-Claude Van Damme where someone else makes a greater impression for jump kicks than him, and Cung Le delivers an incredibly solid effort in doing so while delivering every hook punch and elbow with flawless strength. He isn't given that much of a character and his dramatic charisma is subtle, but in the face of such impressive fight skills I hardly noticed for a second. I felt that Dragon Eyes was an eye opener for me as I walk away from the film with a desire to see more Cung Le movies, so his ambitions were certainly successful in reaching an action junkie like me. Cung Le is definitely the best part about Dragon Eyes, and single handily makes the experience incredibly worthwhile. Jean-Claude Van Damme has very little time on screen, and when he does the only thing he really has to do is punch Cung Le or deliver generic dialogue without a hint of emotional involvement or even a sense of volume about him. It is very much a waste of his talents since he clearly has so much potential, and so fans of his may find disappointment with Dragon Eyes. However, as the man has gotten older, his physical appearance matches the subtle nature of his line delivery and puts a sense of wisdom into the character which puts an entirely different gimmick on him. As a hardcore fan of the man I am very biased in my opinion of his role in the film, but I found that his effort to play the master who trains the protagonist was factually a good turn for him. Jean-Claude Van Damme's presence is welcome as always, and though his role in the film is overstated by the promotional material he still makes a memorable cause by being around and working effectively with Cung Le during the training sequences which does deliver a certain sense of satisfaction in lieu of heavy Van-Damage. And even though he gets less screen time than Jean-Claude Van Damme, the presence of Peter Weller is welcome for the cult movie fans likely to find joy in the experience. So while the story takes itself a bit too seriously at times and there is too little Jean-Claude Van Damme, Dragon Eyes transcends the standards of direct-to-DVD action films by boasting more of the impressive action scenes Peter Hyams is able to capture and an incredible array of fight skills from Cung Le.

  • Oct 27, 2014

    at least the fighting was good

    at least the fighting was good

  • Oct 25, 2014

    Lame, terrible and pointless though there are some good fight scenes but its a waste of time to watch it

    Lame, terrible and pointless though there are some good fight scenes but its a waste of time to watch it

  • Jun 09, 2014

    Terrible, Terrible, Terrible...Kt seems every movie I try to watch of JCVD's for sometime now has been a Huge B Movie!! How do you go from being on the top A actor's list in the 90's to making suck bad movies now..

    Terrible, Terrible, Terrible...Kt seems every movie I try to watch of JCVD's for sometime now has been a Huge B Movie!! How do you go from being on the top A actor's list in the 90's to making suck bad movies now..