Fang zhi gu niang (Weaving Girl) Reviews

  • Mar 02, 2010

    "La Tisseuse" un magnifique portrait de femme, un film mélancolique et émouvant sur la dure réalité sociale en Chine qui a un côté kafkaiën et sur la fuite des jours...un beau film où l'on touche le fond du désepoir.. a bit to much for me !

    "La Tisseuse" un magnifique portrait de femme, un film mélancolique et émouvant sur la dure réalité sociale en Chine qui a un côté kafkaiën et sur la fuite des jours...un beau film où l'on touche le fond du désepoir.. a bit to much for me !

  • Nov 23, 2009

    Out of all the human emotions that one feels, regreat can be one of the most power... and destructive.... that we as humans afflict upon ourselves. As we go about our daily lives, we do what we feel we need to in order to attain to whatever it is we feel we want at that moment. ONly in times of uncertainty (or in the case of this film.... the learing of ones imposing death), do we look back upon what we have done and ask.... what if.... Weaving Girl, from chinese director Quanan Wang is not the best film you will ever see, but it certainly is a film that has a point of view and a vison to what it is trying to convey... if not slowly. Feeling more like two to three hours at times (rather than the one hundred minutes it almost unbelievably turned out to be), it is a story of one woman's struggle to come to terms with her own death, and to be able to come to accept not only her early demise, but be at peace with the (short) life she has led up to this time. Shots can be long in this film, and many scenes are shown more as a reflection (on the part of the main character) than anything else. This (for me) generally worked, but for others I could see it as being a bit long winded and tedious. One can't help but feel some type of sorrow, empathy and understanding ( especially during the scenes where she tries but cannot, for a varity of reasons, end her own life before the cancer takes her) for the character as she tries (generally but not it seems very sucessfully) to come to terms with her own impending mortality by doing, revisiting, completing and accomplishing at least a few of the things that it seems she wanted out of life (including re-connecting briefly with her long lost love in Bejing... if not for more then just letting them know how she really felt, visiting the ocean and travelling as far from her village as she ever had in her life, and just going out to dance and enjoy living without the worry of paying bills, looking after a family or working). Hers is not the most luxurious of lives, nor the easiest, and while one may see this as more a movie that asks us all to look at what we really do with our lives (especially when the end comes), I did not, personally, necessarily see this as a movie about regret, unachieved desires or wants. For me, I saw this film as a film about all of us in some way.... and how we, in any state of mind, may react to the news of knowing our time is very limited, and what we would do in the time we have left. Very chinese, very slow moving and very emotional (in its simplicity of shots and conveyance of emotions), Weaving Girl is definately not a film for everyone, and while it even tested my ability at times to be interested in her struggles with the impending end, there was more then enough to keep me to the end, and beyond...

    Out of all the human emotions that one feels, regreat can be one of the most power... and destructive.... that we as humans afflict upon ourselves. As we go about our daily lives, we do what we feel we need to in order to attain to whatever it is we feel we want at that moment. ONly in times of uncertainty (or in the case of this film.... the learing of ones imposing death), do we look back upon what we have done and ask.... what if.... Weaving Girl, from chinese director Quanan Wang is not the best film you will ever see, but it certainly is a film that has a point of view and a vison to what it is trying to convey... if not slowly. Feeling more like two to three hours at times (rather than the one hundred minutes it almost unbelievably turned out to be), it is a story of one woman's struggle to come to terms with her own death, and to be able to come to accept not only her early demise, but be at peace with the (short) life she has led up to this time. Shots can be long in this film, and many scenes are shown more as a reflection (on the part of the main character) than anything else. This (for me) generally worked, but for others I could see it as being a bit long winded and tedious. One can't help but feel some type of sorrow, empathy and understanding ( especially during the scenes where she tries but cannot, for a varity of reasons, end her own life before the cancer takes her) for the character as she tries (generally but not it seems very sucessfully) to come to terms with her own impending mortality by doing, revisiting, completing and accomplishing at least a few of the things that it seems she wanted out of life (including re-connecting briefly with her long lost love in Bejing... if not for more then just letting them know how she really felt, visiting the ocean and travelling as far from her village as she ever had in her life, and just going out to dance and enjoy living without the worry of paying bills, looking after a family or working). Hers is not the most luxurious of lives, nor the easiest, and while one may see this as more a movie that asks us all to look at what we really do with our lives (especially when the end comes), I did not, personally, necessarily see this as a movie about regret, unachieved desires or wants. For me, I saw this film as a film about all of us in some way.... and how we, in any state of mind, may react to the news of knowing our time is very limited, and what we would do in the time we have left. Very chinese, very slow moving and very emotional (in its simplicity of shots and conveyance of emotions), Weaving Girl is definately not a film for everyone, and while it even tested my ability at times to be interested in her struggles with the impending end, there was more then enough to keep me to the end, and beyond...