Drunken Monkey (Chui ma lau) Reviews

  • May 10, 2016

    [center] [center][img]http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/1915/29002bu3.jpg[/img] [/center] [/center] What to expect in a movie called “Drunken Monkey?” A wild Friday night at the zoo? Well, it turns out to be a martial arts film. The premise involves an uncle and his nephew (roughly of the same age) searching for a legendary kung fu master. They have no idea the trouble they’re in for. And when there’s trouble, you know that there are going to be some arms and legs violently flailing for sure. The movie is really a showcase for Lau Kar Leung, who not only directs but also plays the kung fu master. At 66, the old man exhibits agility and robust strength to the tip of his fingers. The fighting style however is a bit bizarre. The actors do monkey poses and silly faces. Their secret weapon is wine. Come to think of it, that makes sense. Alcohol does make a monkey out of you. With its mixture of kick-ass action and goofy Chinese comedy, this cocktail of a movie is a punch. “Drunken Monkey” is a passable entertainment that might be more fun if you watch it inebriated. Have yourself a simian party.

    [center] [center][img]http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/1915/29002bu3.jpg[/img] [/center] [/center] What to expect in a movie called “Drunken Monkey?” A wild Friday night at the zoo? Well, it turns out to be a martial arts film. The premise involves an uncle and his nephew (roughly of the same age) searching for a legendary kung fu master. They have no idea the trouble they’re in for. And when there’s trouble, you know that there are going to be some arms and legs violently flailing for sure. The movie is really a showcase for Lau Kar Leung, who not only directs but also plays the kung fu master. At 66, the old man exhibits agility and robust strength to the tip of his fingers. The fighting style however is a bit bizarre. The actors do monkey poses and silly faces. Their secret weapon is wine. Come to think of it, that makes sense. Alcohol does make a monkey out of you. With its mixture of kick-ass action and goofy Chinese comedy, this cocktail of a movie is a punch. “Drunken Monkey” is a passable entertainment that might be more fun if you watch it inebriated. Have yourself a simian party.

  • May 10, 2016

    (**): [img]http://images.rottentomatoes.com/images/user/icons/icon13.gif[/img] I really liked the action-packed opening sequences but the film falters in its lame comedic moments which take up a good chunk of the middle portion of the film. Good fight scenes but I wish there was more of those.

    (**): [img]http://images.rottentomatoes.com/images/user/icons/icon13.gif[/img] I really liked the action-packed opening sequences but the film falters in its lame comedic moments which take up a good chunk of the middle portion of the film. Good fight scenes but I wish there was more of those.

  • May 10, 2016

    Over the last few years a pile of DVDs that I've bought but never gotten around to watching has grown.... if its something I REALLY want to see I'll usually buy it right away after buying it. In an effort to reduce the size of this pile, I put one in the other day and watched it over a few sittings: [img]http://www.alivenotdead.com/attachments/2007/12/23002_200712260053521.thumb.jpg[/img] Its the 2002 release '[url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drunken_Monkey_%282002_film%29"][b]Drunken Monkey[/b][/url]' ([url="http://www.wu-jing.net/drama/drunken.htm"]îÍàÍ[/url]) starring our old pal Wu Jing! Actually its also directed by [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lau_Kar_Leung"]Lau Kar-leung[/url], who you may remember from 'Drunken Master 2'... he stars in the movie as does his adopted brother and frequent collaborator Gordon Liu. From what I understand, after he did his first big screen role 'Tai Chi 2' in the late 90s, he got stuck doing a LOT of Mainland TV series for like 5 years before finally being able to do this film as his second feature film. The /main/ plot is that a famous imperial courier is double crossed by his brother who sells him out to drug smugglers, so he enlists the aid of his daughter and two enthusiastic students to get revenge. Lau plays the master and Wu Jing plays one of the two students he takes on. He teaches them the super powerful /drunken monkey style/ of wushu. Its not a really great movie... some of the scenes are quite silly of course (i mean as you can guess from the title... it contains quite a bit of 'monkey being drunk'). But the martial arts is pretty decent at least and its great to see a relatively young Wu Jing on the screen. The picture quality is pretty decent, but the subtitles were pretty crappy (they refer to it as 'monkeyish fist' actually). I'll give it a 6/10. Since I only paid like HK$20 for it, it was worth it, but I guess I don't regret waiting a year or two to get to it. :-P

    Over the last few years a pile of DVDs that I've bought but never gotten around to watching has grown.... if its something I REALLY want to see I'll usually buy it right away after buying it. In an effort to reduce the size of this pile, I put one in the other day and watched it over a few sittings: [img]http://www.alivenotdead.com/attachments/2007/12/23002_200712260053521.thumb.jpg[/img] Its the 2002 release '[url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drunken_Monkey_%282002_film%29"][b]Drunken Monkey[/b][/url]' ([url="http://www.wu-jing.net/drama/drunken.htm"]îÍàÍ[/url]) starring our old pal Wu Jing! Actually its also directed by [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lau_Kar_Leung"]Lau Kar-leung[/url], who you may remember from 'Drunken Master 2'... he stars in the movie as does his adopted brother and frequent collaborator Gordon Liu. From what I understand, after he did his first big screen role 'Tai Chi 2' in the late 90s, he got stuck doing a LOT of Mainland TV series for like 5 years before finally being able to do this film as his second feature film. The /main/ plot is that a famous imperial courier is double crossed by his brother who sells him out to drug smugglers, so he enlists the aid of his daughter and two enthusiastic students to get revenge. Lau plays the master and Wu Jing plays one of the two students he takes on. He teaches them the super powerful /drunken monkey style/ of wushu. Its not a really great movie... some of the scenes are quite silly of course (i mean as you can guess from the title... it contains quite a bit of 'monkey being drunk'). But the martial arts is pretty decent at least and its great to see a relatively young Wu Jing on the screen. The picture quality is pretty decent, but the subtitles were pretty crappy (they refer to it as 'monkeyish fist' actually). I'll give it a 6/10. Since I only paid like HK$20 for it, it was worth it, but I guess I don't regret waiting a year or two to get to it. :-P

  • Feb 01, 2012

    An average martial arts that is rather cheesy at points and the acting is almost terrible. It's not all bad but nothing that makes this stand out from the others.

    An average martial arts that is rather cheesy at points and the acting is almost terrible. It's not all bad but nothing that makes this stand out from the others.

  • Aug 01, 2011

    A fun low budget martial arts movie directed by Director Chia-Laing Liu with 70s action styles.70s action style wont attract today audience anymore,unless he or she likes classic martial movies.But still,Director Chia-Liang Liu's direction is great as always and the action is well choreographed.If there is less annoying jokes,make the movie more serious and better sounds effect,it will be better and I may gave it more stars.Actor Wu Jing should play more movie like this,he's a good martial arts stars..I'm sure he will be a new Jet Li in future.Drunken Monkey is an average and fun low budget movie,worth a watch.:)

    A fun low budget martial arts movie directed by Director Chia-Laing Liu with 70s action styles.70s action style wont attract today audience anymore,unless he or she likes classic martial movies.But still,Director Chia-Liang Liu's direction is great as always and the action is well choreographed.If there is less annoying jokes,make the movie more serious and better sounds effect,it will be better and I may gave it more stars.Actor Wu Jing should play more movie like this,he's a good martial arts stars..I'm sure he will be a new Jet Li in future.Drunken Monkey is an average and fun low budget movie,worth a watch.:)

  • Aug 13, 2010

    Bill is respectable, hard working, ethical, and proud of his Chinese heritage. However, his brother, Man Pao, has mixed with Master Yu to traffic opium into his country. When Bill discovers this he confronts his brother only to get stabbed in the back, thrown off a bridge, and left for dead. Two kung fu students who obsess over Monkey Kung Fu look to find Bill to finish a book they are putting together. Bill is living in hiatus with a young female student, Mandy. Bill reluctantly decides to take these two students as his own. Once the two new students are trained, combined with Mandy, the four seek revenge for the injustices conducted on Bill. “Someone told me you always gamble and whore.” Chia-Liang Lu, director of Seven Swords, Drunken Master 2, Eight Diagram Pole Fighter, My Young Auntie, and Instructors of Death directs Drunken Monkey. Drunken Monkey was the first film Lu had directed in eight years, and marked the triumphant return of Shaw Brothers. Disappointingly, the film did neither. The storyline was interesting, and possessed intriguing characters. The action scenes were top notch, but the film possessed limited star power. “A cunning dog does bite without prior notice.” Choreography during the opening and closing credits, the surprise from the dead body in river, painting scene, baseball scene, fight to save Mandy, drawings, training with boards, Fight in hallway after cunning dog conversation, and the ending fight sequence were my favorite portions of the film. The legendary Gordon Liu plays Hung Yat Fu; however, his character is under utilized and only has one fight sequence. “I wish I’d be drunk forever.” Drunken Monkey was a film that I received many inquires about in several martial arts circles. I had read mixed reviews on the film. I purchased it on a whim as I am a fan of the director. I left the viewing of this film disappointed. Having watched it twice now I like it a little more then the previous viewing, but it is still a disappointment. A Jet Li protégée appears in this film; well, he is not Jet Li. The script was clever, entertaining, action packed, and funny. Overall, the film lacked a character with presence or that had an aura to him. “Wine can raise your energy.” Grade: C+

    Bill is respectable, hard working, ethical, and proud of his Chinese heritage. However, his brother, Man Pao, has mixed with Master Yu to traffic opium into his country. When Bill discovers this he confronts his brother only to get stabbed in the back, thrown off a bridge, and left for dead. Two kung fu students who obsess over Monkey Kung Fu look to find Bill to finish a book they are putting together. Bill is living in hiatus with a young female student, Mandy. Bill reluctantly decides to take these two students as his own. Once the two new students are trained, combined with Mandy, the four seek revenge for the injustices conducted on Bill. “Someone told me you always gamble and whore.” Chia-Liang Lu, director of Seven Swords, Drunken Master 2, Eight Diagram Pole Fighter, My Young Auntie, and Instructors of Death directs Drunken Monkey. Drunken Monkey was the first film Lu had directed in eight years, and marked the triumphant return of Shaw Brothers. Disappointingly, the film did neither. The storyline was interesting, and possessed intriguing characters. The action scenes were top notch, but the film possessed limited star power. “A cunning dog does bite without prior notice.” Choreography during the opening and closing credits, the surprise from the dead body in river, painting scene, baseball scene, fight to save Mandy, drawings, training with boards, Fight in hallway after cunning dog conversation, and the ending fight sequence were my favorite portions of the film. The legendary Gordon Liu plays Hung Yat Fu; however, his character is under utilized and only has one fight sequence. “I wish I’d be drunk forever.” Drunken Monkey was a film that I received many inquires about in several martial arts circles. I had read mixed reviews on the film. I purchased it on a whim as I am a fan of the director. I left the viewing of this film disappointed. Having watched it twice now I like it a little more then the previous viewing, but it is still a disappointment. A Jet Li protégée appears in this film; well, he is not Jet Li. The script was clever, entertaining, action packed, and funny. Overall, the film lacked a character with presence or that had an aura to him. “Wine can raise your energy.” Grade: C+

  • Feb 27, 2010

    At least it's cool to see old school kung fu with Wushu...

    At least it's cool to see old school kung fu with Wushu...

  • Dec 18, 2009

    A good old fashioned martial arts movie spruced up for the new century.

    A good old fashioned martial arts movie spruced up for the new century.

  • Oct 29, 2009

    If you have a soft spot for 1970's style kung fu flix where first rate martial artist fought it out on solid ground with little reliance on wires, then DRUNKEN MONKEY is the movie for you! If you've wondered what ever became of stars like Shaw Brothers' greats Chi Kuan-Chun, Liu Chia-Hui (aka Gordon Liu), and master choreographer Liu Chia-Liang now that the youngest of them is well into his 50's, then DRUNKEN MONKEY is the movie for you! If you don't object to some laughs with your martial mayhem and some nostalgia with your kung fu kata, then DRUNKEN MONKEY is the definitely the movie for you! Directed and choreographed by Liu Chia-Liang ( in pinyin that's Lau Kar-Leung) and starring him as well, DRUNKEN MONKEY is just plain old fun from start to finish, with plenty of great fights and forms thrown into the mix not only by our old favorites mentioned above, but also by the younger generation represented by Wu Jing, Lau Wing-Kin, and Shannon Yao. The plot centers on opium smuggling within Liu Chia-liang's delivery service, an operation somewhat like Wells Fargo. The smugglers are headed up by the hero's own brother who is in cahoots with the evil Chi Kuan-Chun. Seeing an old master like Liu Chia-Liang again is like a gift from heaven. Time seems to have completely passed him by; he's every bit as flexible, fluid, and graceful as he ever was--fast too. Chi Kuan Chun, who co-starred in many Shaw Brothers films in the 70s along side the late lamented Alexander Fu Sheng is still recognizeable although it may take a second or third glance. As a fighter he's still sharp as a tack. And everybody's favorite bald headed monk Gordon Liu Chia-Hui is no slouch either. He'll remind you how he became a household name in case you forgot. The younger generation in this film (Wu Jing, Shannon Yao etc.) is fine, but its the old guard that really makes this film worth seeing.

    If you have a soft spot for 1970's style kung fu flix where first rate martial artist fought it out on solid ground with little reliance on wires, then DRUNKEN MONKEY is the movie for you! If you've wondered what ever became of stars like Shaw Brothers' greats Chi Kuan-Chun, Liu Chia-Hui (aka Gordon Liu), and master choreographer Liu Chia-Liang now that the youngest of them is well into his 50's, then DRUNKEN MONKEY is the movie for you! If you don't object to some laughs with your martial mayhem and some nostalgia with your kung fu kata, then DRUNKEN MONKEY is the definitely the movie for you! Directed and choreographed by Liu Chia-Liang ( in pinyin that's Lau Kar-Leung) and starring him as well, DRUNKEN MONKEY is just plain old fun from start to finish, with plenty of great fights and forms thrown into the mix not only by our old favorites mentioned above, but also by the younger generation represented by Wu Jing, Lau Wing-Kin, and Shannon Yao. The plot centers on opium smuggling within Liu Chia-liang's delivery service, an operation somewhat like Wells Fargo. The smugglers are headed up by the hero's own brother who is in cahoots with the evil Chi Kuan-Chun. Seeing an old master like Liu Chia-Liang again is like a gift from heaven. Time seems to have completely passed him by; he's every bit as flexible, fluid, and graceful as he ever was--fast too. Chi Kuan Chun, who co-starred in many Shaw Brothers films in the 70s along side the late lamented Alexander Fu Sheng is still recognizeable although it may take a second or third glance. As a fighter he's still sharp as a tack. And everybody's favorite bald headed monk Gordon Liu Chia-Hui is no slouch either. He'll remind you how he became a household name in case you forgot. The younger generation in this film (Wu Jing, Shannon Yao etc.) is fine, but its the old guard that really makes this film worth seeing.

  • Nov 10, 2008

    This is a slightly odd movie that seemed that seemed to be part kung-fu movie and part tribute to kung-fu movies. Maybe it was the translation and the indefinite time period it seems to occur in. It has some really nice fight scenes and some funny bits. The dramatic tension never really quite gets to where it should be but these guys escalate the fighting quite well. I liked the movie but depending on what sort of martial arts fan you are, you might not.

    This is a slightly odd movie that seemed that seemed to be part kung-fu movie and part tribute to kung-fu movies. Maybe it was the translation and the indefinite time period it seems to occur in. It has some really nice fight scenes and some funny bits. The dramatic tension never really quite gets to where it should be but these guys escalate the fighting quite well. I liked the movie but depending on what sort of martial arts fan you are, you might not.