Egymásra nézve (Another Way) (1983)

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

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Movie Info

Our first view of the character played by Jadwiga Jankowski Cieslak is a closeup of her corpse. In flashback, we learn that Cieslak had been a female journalist in the strife-torn Hungary of 1958. The film explores her efforts to report facts in the face of governmental fallacy, as well as her long homosexual affair with Grazyna Szapolowska, another journalist. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi
Rating:
PG
Genre:
Art House & International , Drama
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 wide
On DVD:
Runtime:

Critic Reviews for Egymásra nézve (Another Way)

All Critics (1)

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | February 8, 2006
Time Out
Top Critic

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August 30, 2004
New York Times
Top Critic

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | January 10, 2004
Chicago Reader
Top Critic

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November 8, 2005
EmanuelLevy.Com

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Full Review… | May 24, 2003
Film4

Audience Reviews for Egymásra nézve (Another Way)

½

I love Grazyna Szapolowska´s gestures, the way she touches each object and herself (her face specially), as being able to hold every feeling and thought in her hands.

Rubia  Carolina
Rubia Carolina

Super Reviewer

½

"Another Way" starts with Livia(Grazyna Szapolowska) recovering from serious injuries in a hospital in Hungary in 1958. Her wounds are more than just physical, as she also mourns the loss of her friend Eva(Jadwiga Jankowska) while Livia's husband Donci(Peter Andorai) is in jail. Livia first met Eva when she came to work at a journal in Budapest, despite her political past. With a stable job, her friend and former lover Magda(Judit Pogany) pays her a visit. How in the name of Lenin did this movie get made in Hungary with the Communists in power? I am not talking about the eroticism or its sensitive take on a sapphic romance.(Compare this to the awkward "Personal Best" which was made around the same time.) No, as the director says in an interview on the DVD, gender really does not matter in this relationship which goes to show the lack of privacy in Communist Hungary where everybody is watching, informers are rampant and police interfere in personal lives. That leaves the only interesting conversations to be had in corridors, not in conference rooms where the decisions are made.

Walter M.
Walter M.

Super Reviewer

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