Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room Reviews

  • Oct 02, 2017

    A somewhat interesting documentary that failed to impress me as much as say... Inside Job for a few reasons. Let's make a comparison: -Enron: TSGITR has an obvious liberal democratic political bias. Inside Job was remarkably even handed and true to history. I feel like the informed viewer is interested in truth and is cognizant of the fact that beyond a certain level there is quite a bit of corruption on both sides of the isle at which point partisanship is basically a rouse meant for the consumption of the so called "little people". -Enron: TSGITR has only serviceable production value. Inside Job in stark contrast has stellar production value. -Enron: TSGITR peddles a mixed message at times blaming one individual for the entire scandal, then immediately posing another as the chief offender, waffling back and forth to pump up each person's villain cred in order to be sensational. Inside Job gives blame and credit exactly where blame and credit are due and lets you decide the rest. -Enron: TSGITR is dour and plodding focusing almost entirely on the moral aspect of unethical business practices engaged in by Enron traders and execs. Inside job feels *naturally* sensational and interesting without actually sensationalizing. It does this simply by touching on the decadence involved (i.e. what these mustache twirling cads actually spent their ill-gotten gains on). This is not only more interesting as a guilty pleasure but provides a window into *why* people do these things instead of lazily labeling it "greed" and calling it a day. -Enron: TSGITR is filled with speakers (actual documentary participants) who throughout the duration of this film refer to events at Enron in a manner that implies they didn't know and are somehow morally superior to the subject matter. Meanwhile as an audience member you're likely smart enough to realize they're about as credible as a German soldier claiming to have "just been following orders" when the curtain fell on that whole thing... These are people that took part in the scandal albeit to a lesser degree, did nothing to stop it, flipped on their colleagues to avoid punishment when the cat was out of the bag, then got even richer writing books about it. *cringe* Inside Job is filled with speakers detailing how they were railroaded for trying to actually *oppose* corruption. This is their chance to speak and be heard. You can feel good about that and the entire experience has more value because of it. I make this comparison because I feel like the two documentaries are very much in the same vein and that audience members who were impressed with Inside Job might watch Enron: TSGITR hoping for similar treatment. In the end I can't say I hate this documentary because it was passable. I just feel it could have been quite a bit better considering the sheer scale, duration, and impact of the scandal.

    A somewhat interesting documentary that failed to impress me as much as say... Inside Job for a few reasons. Let's make a comparison: -Enron: TSGITR has an obvious liberal democratic political bias. Inside Job was remarkably even handed and true to history. I feel like the informed viewer is interested in truth and is cognizant of the fact that beyond a certain level there is quite a bit of corruption on both sides of the isle at which point partisanship is basically a rouse meant for the consumption of the so called "little people". -Enron: TSGITR has only serviceable production value. Inside Job in stark contrast has stellar production value. -Enron: TSGITR peddles a mixed message at times blaming one individual for the entire scandal, then immediately posing another as the chief offender, waffling back and forth to pump up each person's villain cred in order to be sensational. Inside Job gives blame and credit exactly where blame and credit are due and lets you decide the rest. -Enron: TSGITR is dour and plodding focusing almost entirely on the moral aspect of unethical business practices engaged in by Enron traders and execs. Inside job feels *naturally* sensational and interesting without actually sensationalizing. It does this simply by touching on the decadence involved (i.e. what these mustache twirling cads actually spent their ill-gotten gains on). This is not only more interesting as a guilty pleasure but provides a window into *why* people do these things instead of lazily labeling it "greed" and calling it a day. -Enron: TSGITR is filled with speakers (actual documentary participants) who throughout the duration of this film refer to events at Enron in a manner that implies they didn't know and are somehow morally superior to the subject matter. Meanwhile as an audience member you're likely smart enough to realize they're about as credible as a German soldier claiming to have "just been following orders" when the curtain fell on that whole thing... These are people that took part in the scandal albeit to a lesser degree, did nothing to stop it, flipped on their colleagues to avoid punishment when the cat was out of the bag, then got even richer writing books about it. *cringe* Inside Job is filled with speakers detailing how they were railroaded for trying to actually *oppose* corruption. This is their chance to speak and be heard. You can feel good about that and the entire experience has more value because of it. I make this comparison because I feel like the two documentaries are very much in the same vein and that audience members who were impressed with Inside Job might watch Enron: TSGITR hoping for similar treatment. In the end I can't say I hate this documentary because it was passable. I just feel it could have been quite a bit better considering the sheer scale, duration, and impact of the scandal.

  • Apr 23, 2017

    A lesson from recent history, a brilliantly edited analysis of how hubris and criminality led to the downfall of America's largest energy-trading company. You don't need to understand trading or banking to identify the simpering evil of crooks like Kenneth Lay and Jeffrey Skilling, still brazenly claiming innocence when confronted at Senate hearings. A movie that Philip Green should be forced to watch.

    A lesson from recent history, a brilliantly edited analysis of how hubris and criminality led to the downfall of America's largest energy-trading company. You don't need to understand trading or banking to identify the simpering evil of crooks like Kenneth Lay and Jeffrey Skilling, still brazenly claiming innocence when confronted at Senate hearings. A movie that Philip Green should be forced to watch.

  • Feb 13, 2017

    A documemtary of epic proportions. The eerie feeling it leaves you with lingers for a while. The curiosity it sparks in you will lead you through an intellectual discussion with yourself.

    A documemtary of epic proportions. The eerie feeling it leaves you with lingers for a while. The curiosity it sparks in you will lead you through an intellectual discussion with yourself.

  • Jan 27, 2017

    Good documentary on the story on Enron and what happened with the collapse of the company. Reminded me of Wolf of Wallstreet movie and hard to believe that these got away with it for so long.

    Good documentary on the story on Enron and what happened with the collapse of the company. Reminded me of Wolf of Wallstreet movie and hard to believe that these got away with it for so long.

  • Nov 08, 2016

    As much an absorbing business class intermission as it is a cautionary tale about greed, Alex Gibney's "Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room" is a documentary of Enron's infuriating scandals and disastrous and deserving downfall.

    As much an absorbing business class intermission as it is a cautionary tale about greed, Alex Gibney's "Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room" is a documentary of Enron's infuriating scandals and disastrous and deserving downfall.

  • Oct 18, 2016

    A well constructed doc uncovering the corruption and downfalls of Enron. The only thing missing were interviews with the criminal execs, and hearing their justifications.

    A well constructed doc uncovering the corruption and downfalls of Enron. The only thing missing were interviews with the criminal execs, and hearing their justifications.

  • Oct 09, 2016

    I finally saw this incisive documentary on the infamous implosion of Enron at the turn of the 21st Century. The ruthlessness and recklessness of Skilling, Lay, Fastow, et al is a modern-day, horror story. Much of what this film reveals as the reason or reasons for Enron's collapse ends up foreshadowing the financial collapse of 2007-08.

    I finally saw this incisive documentary on the infamous implosion of Enron at the turn of the 21st Century. The ruthlessness and recklessness of Skilling, Lay, Fastow, et al is a modern-day, horror story. Much of what this film reveals as the reason or reasons for Enron's collapse ends up foreshadowing the financial collapse of 2007-08.

  • Aug 12, 2016

    Brilliant expose of how, abled by Bush and other Republican scum, Enron robbed and expolited Californians.

    Brilliant expose of how, abled by Bush and other Republican scum, Enron robbed and expolited Californians.

  • May 03, 2016

    A brilliant portrait of Enron, one of the biggest frauds in the history of the corporate world. It's hard to believe this was less than two decades ago, but it's possible some of the same fraud is still happening in regards to corporate greed. Where will it end? Clearly not with this movie. This is a powerful watch and one of the finest documentaries this century. A must-see.

    A brilliant portrait of Enron, one of the biggest frauds in the history of the corporate world. It's hard to believe this was less than two decades ago, but it's possible some of the same fraud is still happening in regards to corporate greed. Where will it end? Clearly not with this movie. This is a powerful watch and one of the finest documentaries this century. A must-see.

  • Apr 17, 2016

    I had no idea the scandal was this layered and how long they had gotten away with it.

    I had no idea the scandal was this layered and how long they had gotten away with it.