Eros Reviews

  • Jul 14, 2020

    Hahaha,actually,this movie got a high praise in douban which is Chinese movie rating web.

    Hahaha,actually,this movie got a high praise in douban which is Chinese movie rating web.

  • May 20, 2020

    The first one is really good but the others are awful.

    The first one is really good but the others are awful.

  • May 21, 2018

    Eros is an anthology film that is ostensibly focused on the themes of love and sex. It’s debatable how successful each of the short films was at conveying those themes, or even telling a decent story. In many ways this fell prey to the law of diminishing returns as each moment you watch it got worse and worse. But let me discuss each short film individually because trying to talk about the film as one complete story is impossible. There is no connective tissue between each segment, and they all feel totally different from one another. 1. “The Hand” – This is the only section of this movie that is worth watching. It is slow-paced and methodical, but it tells a compelling story of love and lust. Wong Kar-Wai is able to attain this without being exploitative at all. There is almost no nudity shown and yet it feels raw and real. There is beauty, emotion, and subtlety to this short film. You can feel that this is handled by the same director as In the Mood for Love, because it has a similar feel to it. If you can find this short film isolated from the rest of Eros I would highly recommend it, because The Hand on its own is a superb work of art. It’s too bad it is dragged down by the other components of the movie. 2. “Equilibrium” – Everything seems right for this to be a great chapter in this anthology. I mean it has Steven Soderbergh as writer/director, and it has Robert Downey, Jr. and Alan Arkin starring in it. But there is no story here. It is RDJ rambling about a sexual dream for way too long, and Alan Arkin acting distracted. I think I get the point of the short, because it seems to be focusing on the fact that the things which seem erotic and exciting to one person can be boring to someone listening to them. But that means most of this segment is also boring to those watching it. I was as distracted as Alan Arkin while watching this sequence, and could not care less about how it was resolved. 3. “The Dangerous Thread of Things” – Even if there was some redeeming quality left in Eros after the disaster of the second short, it was stomped out of existence when this one started. Michelangelo Antonioni should be ashamed of what he put into this short film. It is pure exploitation taken to a disgraceful level. This is like sitting through soft-core porn, and I won’t be embarrassed to admit I fast-forwarded through large chunks of it. There was no story, there was no purpose, there was just nudity for the sake of nudity. It’s the kind of thing I would like to unsee if that was possible.

    Eros is an anthology film that is ostensibly focused on the themes of love and sex. It’s debatable how successful each of the short films was at conveying those themes, or even telling a decent story. In many ways this fell prey to the law of diminishing returns as each moment you watch it got worse and worse. But let me discuss each short film individually because trying to talk about the film as one complete story is impossible. There is no connective tissue between each segment, and they all feel totally different from one another. 1. “The Hand” – This is the only section of this movie that is worth watching. It is slow-paced and methodical, but it tells a compelling story of love and lust. Wong Kar-Wai is able to attain this without being exploitative at all. There is almost no nudity shown and yet it feels raw and real. There is beauty, emotion, and subtlety to this short film. You can feel that this is handled by the same director as In the Mood for Love, because it has a similar feel to it. If you can find this short film isolated from the rest of Eros I would highly recommend it, because The Hand on its own is a superb work of art. It’s too bad it is dragged down by the other components of the movie. 2. “Equilibrium” – Everything seems right for this to be a great chapter in this anthology. I mean it has Steven Soderbergh as writer/director, and it has Robert Downey, Jr. and Alan Arkin starring in it. But there is no story here. It is RDJ rambling about a sexual dream for way too long, and Alan Arkin acting distracted. I think I get the point of the short, because it seems to be focusing on the fact that the things which seem erotic and exciting to one person can be boring to someone listening to them. But that means most of this segment is also boring to those watching it. I was as distracted as Alan Arkin while watching this sequence, and could not care less about how it was resolved. 3. “The Dangerous Thread of Things” – Even if there was some redeeming quality left in Eros after the disaster of the second short, it was stomped out of existence when this one started. Michelangelo Antonioni should be ashamed of what he put into this short film. It is pure exploitation taken to a disgraceful level. This is like sitting through soft-core porn, and I won’t be embarrassed to admit I fast-forwarded through large chunks of it. There was no story, there was no purpose, there was just nudity for the sake of nudity. It’s the kind of thing I would like to unsee if that was possible.

  • Jan 18, 2016

    I have no strong feelings either way.

    I have no strong feelings either way.

  • Jun 22, 2014

    Eros part d'une très bonne idée, un film à sketches par Michelangelo Antonioni, Wong Kar Wai et Steven Soderbergh autour de l'amour et du sexe. Malheureusement, les trois segments sont très inégaux et si ceux de Soderbergh & Wong Kar Wai sont plutôt bons (même s'ils sont très loin de leurs standards, malgré des thèmes récurrents dans leurs oeuvres), celui d'Antonioni est une catastrophe extrêmement gênante. Pire encore, les trois segments ne forment aucune unité et on peine à comprendre ce que le film raconte.

    Eros part d'une très bonne idée, un film à sketches par Michelangelo Antonioni, Wong Kar Wai et Steven Soderbergh autour de l'amour et du sexe. Malheureusement, les trois segments sont très inégaux et si ceux de Soderbergh & Wong Kar Wai sont plutôt bons (même s'ils sont très loin de leurs standards, malgré des thèmes récurrents dans leurs oeuvres), celui d'Antonioni est une catastrophe extrêmement gênante. Pire encore, les trois segments ne forment aucune unité et on peine à comprendre ce que le film raconte.

  • Oct 04, 2013

    The Hand was perhaps the only thing I liked about this movie, and I respect Wong Kar-wai for that. Equilibrium was okay, and I believe Soderbergh is decent, but I was very disappointed with Michelangelo Antonioni's addition, though I have deep respect for Antonioni as a filmmaker.

    The Hand was perhaps the only thing I liked about this movie, and I respect Wong Kar-wai for that. Equilibrium was okay, and I believe Soderbergh is decent, but I was very disappointed with Michelangelo Antonioni's addition, though I have deep respect for Antonioni as a filmmaker.

  • Apr 17, 2013

    An anthology film which explore the themes of love and sex, in three parts, the first directed by Wong Kar-wai (Chungking Express (1994) and 2046 (2004)), Steven Soderbergh and Michelangelo Antonioni. While it's a good idea for a film, and you have 3 arty directors on board, it ends up being a pretentious mess. Slow, confused and not particular erotic when it should be, which a great shame, as it LOOKS good, but that's it. Wong Kar-wai's segment, The Hand, has prostitute Miss Hua (Gong Li) planning to replace her old dressmaker Master Jin (Feng Tien) with a younger man Zhang (Chen Chang). In Soderbergh's Equilibrium, set in the 1950's, it has Nick Penrose (Robert Downey Jr.) relaying a recurring dream he has about an unknown woman (Ele Keats) to psychiatrist Dr. Pearl (Alan Arkin), who seems to take pleasure in flying paper planes out of his office window. In Antonioni's segement, The Dangerous Thread of Things, couple Christopher (Christopher Buchholz) and Cloe (Regina Nemni) have an arguement and briefly separate, and Cloe has a sensual encounter on the beach with Linda (Luisa Ranieri). It's got a very weird tone, and it's Wong Kar-Wai and Soderbergh's segments come out best, while Antonioni's feels like a parody of his own work, considering Pedro Almodóvar was originally slated to do a segment, it makes you wonder what could have been.

    An anthology film which explore the themes of love and sex, in three parts, the first directed by Wong Kar-wai (Chungking Express (1994) and 2046 (2004)), Steven Soderbergh and Michelangelo Antonioni. While it's a good idea for a film, and you have 3 arty directors on board, it ends up being a pretentious mess. Slow, confused and not particular erotic when it should be, which a great shame, as it LOOKS good, but that's it. Wong Kar-wai's segment, The Hand, has prostitute Miss Hua (Gong Li) planning to replace her old dressmaker Master Jin (Feng Tien) with a younger man Zhang (Chen Chang). In Soderbergh's Equilibrium, set in the 1950's, it has Nick Penrose (Robert Downey Jr.) relaying a recurring dream he has about an unknown woman (Ele Keats) to psychiatrist Dr. Pearl (Alan Arkin), who seems to take pleasure in flying paper planes out of his office window. In Antonioni's segement, The Dangerous Thread of Things, couple Christopher (Christopher Buchholz) and Cloe (Regina Nemni) have an arguement and briefly separate, and Cloe has a sensual encounter on the beach with Linda (Luisa Ranieri). It's got a very weird tone, and it's Wong Kar-Wai and Soderbergh's segments come out best, while Antonioni's feels like a parody of his own work, considering Pedro Almodóvar was originally slated to do a segment, it makes you wonder what could have been.

  • Jan 22, 2013

    If you only watch one of the short films here, do yourself a favor and just watch The Hand. These arbitrary 5 stars are for that one alone.

    If you only watch one of the short films here, do yourself a favor and just watch The Hand. These arbitrary 5 stars are for that one alone.

  • Dec 05, 2012

    The Hand & The Equilibrium were good, But I didn't like Antonioni's The Dangerous Thread Of Things

    The Hand & The Equilibrium were good, But I didn't like Antonioni's The Dangerous Thread Of Things

  • Nov 13, 2012

    Kar Wai Wong's was the best. Soderbergh's was ok. And the other one,,, don't worth watching.

    Kar Wai Wong's was the best. Soderbergh's was ok. And the other one,,, don't worth watching.