Escape From Crime Reviews

  • Apr 16, 2019

    This fast paced, low budget film, directed by D.(David) Ross Lederman, delivers a fun to watch, interesting story (albeit with a few obvious flaws typical to the budget, schedule & times.) Lederman cranks out a movie that is far more satisfying than the 60 minute run time would lead you to expect. He makes great use of the resources he has & keeps the plot moving with a terse and spare narrative. Richard Travis (born: William B. Justice) plays the lead, as Ross O'Hare, with a roughness believable from someone who has grown up on the streets in a tough, poor, neighborhood. He demonstrates the comraderie and solidarity of kids grown up the hard way with his "best friend," Slim Dugan. This friendship remains a staple of the plot. Though there isn't any time wasted on maudlin sorrow or sympathy for either character. Mr. Travis, while keeping the toughness also displays an innocence found only in those who although grown up around law breakers, have yet to actually break the law himself. Travis as the character also clearly demonstrates his loss of belief in the gangster way of life, after serving time in prison for a crime committed when he was miles away in another part of town, but unable to prove. After this incident, he shows the appropriate disillusion in his supposed buddies, who could have saved him if they believed in the solidarity they espoused. I really found Richard Travis believable and likeable in this movie. I've seen him before opposite Betty Davis in The Man Who Came To Dinner. It demonstrates the acting talent that was wasted and ignored during the Studio System, that this man didn't become a famous or well known actor. He delivers a very credible performance in a movie that due to budget & time constraints, failed to explain why this man suddenly gets a parole after only a year or so in prison, or how in the end, big, shoot out scenes, the windows get pierced but don't fall to pieces despite massive police numbers shooting at those windows. But these are little things, easy to overlook in this fast paced, tense story, where you aren't sure what's going to happen until it actually does. The surprise in this movie is... well, that would spoil it. But I expected our ex-con trying to go straight, to end up back in prison or maybe that's what I was afraid of happening. It certainly keeps you guessing to the end. I enjoyed this quite a lot and will look to watch it again & again. The masterful touch of Lederman directing, in spite of the budget and scheduling deficit, make you stay with the action & not quibble over a few faults. The acting of Mr Travis and the female lead (as Mrs. O'Hare) was great for such a crank-it-out style film.

    This fast paced, low budget film, directed by D.(David) Ross Lederman, delivers a fun to watch, interesting story (albeit with a few obvious flaws typical to the budget, schedule & times.) Lederman cranks out a movie that is far more satisfying than the 60 minute run time would lead you to expect. He makes great use of the resources he has & keeps the plot moving with a terse and spare narrative. Richard Travis (born: William B. Justice) plays the lead, as Ross O'Hare, with a roughness believable from someone who has grown up on the streets in a tough, poor, neighborhood. He demonstrates the comraderie and solidarity of kids grown up the hard way with his "best friend," Slim Dugan. This friendship remains a staple of the plot. Though there isn't any time wasted on maudlin sorrow or sympathy for either character. Mr. Travis, while keeping the toughness also displays an innocence found only in those who although grown up around law breakers, have yet to actually break the law himself. Travis as the character also clearly demonstrates his loss of belief in the gangster way of life, after serving time in prison for a crime committed when he was miles away in another part of town, but unable to prove. After this incident, he shows the appropriate disillusion in his supposed buddies, who could have saved him if they believed in the solidarity they espoused. I really found Richard Travis believable and likeable in this movie. I've seen him before opposite Betty Davis in The Man Who Came To Dinner. It demonstrates the acting talent that was wasted and ignored during the Studio System, that this man didn't become a famous or well known actor. He delivers a very credible performance in a movie that due to budget & time constraints, failed to explain why this man suddenly gets a parole after only a year or so in prison, or how in the end, big, shoot out scenes, the windows get pierced but don't fall to pieces despite massive police numbers shooting at those windows. But these are little things, easy to overlook in this fast paced, tense story, where you aren't sure what's going to happen until it actually does. The surprise in this movie is... well, that would spoil it. But I expected our ex-con trying to go straight, to end up back in prison or maybe that's what I was afraid of happening. It certainly keeps you guessing to the end. I enjoyed this quite a lot and will look to watch it again & again. The masterful touch of Lederman directing, in spite of the budget and scheduling deficit, make you stay with the action & not quibble over a few faults. The acting of Mr Travis and the female lead (as Mrs. O'Hare) was great for such a crank-it-out style film.

  • Mar 09, 2015

    ok remake but I prefer the original 1933 version called "Picture Snatcher"

    ok remake but I prefer the original 1933 version called "Picture Snatcher"