Everyone Says I Love You Reviews

  • Jan 10, 2019

    Charming film to watch on a chilly New Year's Eve.

    Charming film to watch on a chilly New Year's Eve.

  • Nov 19, 2018

    I tend to enjoy most of Woody Allen’s comedy films, because I think he has a sharp and witty sense of humor that focuses on good writing instead of infantile jokes. Not that infantile humor can’t work sometimes, but in general a strong script makes for a better movie. What got me even more excited about Everyone Says I Love You was the moment I realized it was a musical. From the first big production number, I was totally excited to see what he’d do with this genre that I love. If only the movie had stuck with that genre all the way through. There are a handful of musical numbers sprinkled throughout the film, but they are rare enough that it almost didn’t feel like a musical to me at all. Most of the time, when the next number would start, I’d have to remind myself this was part of the movie because I started to forget. If Allen wanted to pay homage to classic musicals, he should have leaned into that harder. Instead of being a true musical, Everyone Says I Love You is more of a classic romantic comedy. That’s not a bad thing either, because I also like that genre. It tells a number of romance stories that occur to the different members of a family. This worked well enough, because all of the characters were funny and engaging. But I tend to prefer rom-coms that have a more focused approach, because trying to cover 6 romances at the same time tends to spread each one too thin so there’s not enough emotional investment in any of them. Occasionally the film would center on a single plotline for a longer period of time, and that created some of the best moments of the movie, but then it would shift somewhere else and I started to wonder if we’d ever get back to those people we were following before. The saving grace is that the movie has such a light comedic tone that it doesn’t feel like they need to get too deep. The cast is stacked with so many big name actors and actresses that I lost count at one point. It was great to see so much talent on screen, and I appreciated what most of them were doing in the film. I always have a slight struggle with storylines where a gorgeous woman like Julia Roberts ends up falling for someone as old and unattractive as Woody Allen, but the plot of the film does a good job of excusing that unlikely occurrence. The only actor who bugged me in the film (because Natalie Portman didn’t have much screen time to annoy me) was Edward Norton. I didn’t feel like this role suited him all that well. Perhaps it all stems from my first experience seeing him on film in Primal Fear, but I can’t buy him as a shy and sweet guy any more, I always assume he’s got something devious up his sleeve. So there were some choices that were made in Everyone Says I Love You that I think hurt the film. It’s not a bad movie, because I had a lot of laughs with it and enjoyed the musical numbers, but it could have been great.

    I tend to enjoy most of Woody Allen’s comedy films, because I think he has a sharp and witty sense of humor that focuses on good writing instead of infantile jokes. Not that infantile humor can’t work sometimes, but in general a strong script makes for a better movie. What got me even more excited about Everyone Says I Love You was the moment I realized it was a musical. From the first big production number, I was totally excited to see what he’d do with this genre that I love. If only the movie had stuck with that genre all the way through. There are a handful of musical numbers sprinkled throughout the film, but they are rare enough that it almost didn’t feel like a musical to me at all. Most of the time, when the next number would start, I’d have to remind myself this was part of the movie because I started to forget. If Allen wanted to pay homage to classic musicals, he should have leaned into that harder. Instead of being a true musical, Everyone Says I Love You is more of a classic romantic comedy. That’s not a bad thing either, because I also like that genre. It tells a number of romance stories that occur to the different members of a family. This worked well enough, because all of the characters were funny and engaging. But I tend to prefer rom-coms that have a more focused approach, because trying to cover 6 romances at the same time tends to spread each one too thin so there’s not enough emotional investment in any of them. Occasionally the film would center on a single plotline for a longer period of time, and that created some of the best moments of the movie, but then it would shift somewhere else and I started to wonder if we’d ever get back to those people we were following before. The saving grace is that the movie has such a light comedic tone that it doesn’t feel like they need to get too deep. The cast is stacked with so many big name actors and actresses that I lost count at one point. It was great to see so much talent on screen, and I appreciated what most of them were doing in the film. I always have a slight struggle with storylines where a gorgeous woman like Julia Roberts ends up falling for someone as old and unattractive as Woody Allen, but the plot of the film does a good job of excusing that unlikely occurrence. The only actor who bugged me in the film (because Natalie Portman didn’t have much screen time to annoy me) was Edward Norton. I didn’t feel like this role suited him all that well. Perhaps it all stems from my first experience seeing him on film in Primal Fear, but I can’t buy him as a shy and sweet guy any more, I always assume he’s got something devious up his sleeve. So there were some choices that were made in Everyone Says I Love You that I think hurt the film. It’s not a bad movie, because I had a lot of laughs with it and enjoyed the musical numbers, but it could have been great.

  • Jun 17, 2018

    I had my doubts about this one. Not big fun of musicals, and maybe that's why the film resisted me so long. But "Everyone says I love you" is very lovable. There are a lot of actors that you cannot picturing singing if your life depends on it, and they all sing. Songs are catchy and the dancing is funny. A very charming comedy!

    I had my doubts about this one. Not big fun of musicals, and maybe that's why the film resisted me so long. But "Everyone says I love you" is very lovable. There are a lot of actors that you cannot picturing singing if your life depends on it, and they all sing. Songs are catchy and the dancing is funny. A very charming comedy!

  • Jan 28, 2018

    Story was OK but those people singing & dancing? I don't want to hear Alan Alda or Edward Norton sing. Goldie Hawn came off as the closest any of them could sing but she missed the mark also. The sights of Paris & Venice serve as decent eye candy. But I carefully watched every scene that Woody was in. I just hated the music soooo much...

    Story was OK but those people singing & dancing? I don't want to hear Alan Alda or Edward Norton sing. Goldie Hawn came off as the closest any of them could sing but she missed the mark also. The sights of Paris & Venice serve as decent eye candy. But I carefully watched every scene that Woody was in. I just hated the music soooo much...

  • Aug 22, 2017

    #WoodyAllenRetro Podcast Project Given Woody did this musical within his year timeframe - it's still impressive, a simple lighthearted romance with little depth, actors of note from past and even present are here to again shine, musical set pieces range from decent to medicore with a STUNNING final but short riverside waltz with goldie hawn - a clear masterpiece on its own - overall its good but can't help but wishing woody had 2 or 3 years to prepare this properly as it has the potential of a timeless classic but as it is now, we can see Woody just dabbling in the idea and coming up with something fun and fancy free... people love it more but it also hasn't aged as well as other alike musicals - and usually a musical has a timeless quality to it - good for what it is without a doubt

    #WoodyAllenRetro Podcast Project Given Woody did this musical within his year timeframe - it's still impressive, a simple lighthearted romance with little depth, actors of note from past and even present are here to again shine, musical set pieces range from decent to medicore with a STUNNING final but short riverside waltz with goldie hawn - a clear masterpiece on its own - overall its good but can't help but wishing woody had 2 or 3 years to prepare this properly as it has the potential of a timeless classic but as it is now, we can see Woody just dabbling in the idea and coming up with something fun and fancy free... people love it more but it also hasn't aged as well as other alike musicals - and usually a musical has a timeless quality to it - good for what it is without a doubt

  • Mar 28, 2017

    Did not care for Woody nor anyone else singing mostly unknown (to me) songs which get sung all too often in this many subplot musical. I had to stop watching this though I am a big fan of most Allen films. I also got tired of the male actors seemingly imitating all of Woody's mannerisms. Not very funny at all it was a disappointment and could not watch all the way through. Goldie Hawn hasn't aged one bit miraculously and though not out of her usual character was refreshing compared to all the others. I do not crave finishing this film sadly. --- --- M. rick has spoken.

    Did not care for Woody nor anyone else singing mostly unknown (to me) songs which get sung all too often in this many subplot musical. I had to stop watching this though I am a big fan of most Allen films. I also got tired of the male actors seemingly imitating all of Woody's mannerisms. Not very funny at all it was a disappointment and could not watch all the way through. Goldie Hawn hasn't aged one bit miraculously and though not out of her usual character was refreshing compared to all the others. I do not crave finishing this film sadly. --- --- M. rick has spoken.

  • Aug 10, 2016

    "-In a relationship, it is better to be the leaver than the leavee"

    "-In a relationship, it is better to be the leaver than the leavee"

  • Jan 27, 2016

    "Everyone Says I Love You" differs from most modern musicals in that it doesn't aim to be grand in scope. It aims to be a throwback to the Technicolored, frenetic days of Gene Kelly and Cyd Charisse, albeit with dialogue and characters that directly reflect the modern attitudes of its writer, director, and star, Woody Allen. There is no thunderous imagery a la "Moulin Rouge!" (2001), and there are no Broadway sized numbers akin to "Chicago" (2002). It is small and intimate, its song and dance numbers giggling in the way they depict the average Joe belting as best they can, boogying with sweet conviction. Certainly, it is among Allen's best, most universal films - but few are able to recall it, as it came at the end of an era that didn't rake in as much critical and commercial acclaim as the decades preceding it. It makes use of a superb ensemble cast, putting most of its attention onto the fictional Dandridge family, a wealthy New York based bunch liberal and free-wheeling in their beliefs. The unit is headed by Bob (Alan Alda) and Steffi (Goldie Hawn), parents in the prime of middle-age that have retained an admirable zest for life. Together, they have four kids, the angsty Scott (Lukas Haas), who has decided to become a conservative Republican, the flaky Skylar (Drew Barrymore), and a pair of preteen girls, Lane (Gaby Hoffman) and Laura (Natalie Portman). Steffi's daughter DJ (Natasha Lyonne), the result of her previous marriage to writer Joe Berlin (Allen), narrates and co-stars. As the film opens, the family is facing rambunctious family drama better described as whimsical than serious. Skylar is getting married to the earnest Holden Spence (Edward Norton), but it so easily romantically persuaded that a lasting relationship may not be a very realistic place to go. Steffi, a lifelong rich girl who has devoted her entire adult life to social work, is in the process of attempting to get convict Charles Ferry (Tim Roth) released from prison, whom she believes is serving a sentence far from the result of fairness. Wanting to find love again, Joe hooks up with the much younger Von (Julia Roberts), a woman in the grips of an unhappy marriage; Laura and Lane are interested in the same boy; and DJ won't stop falling in love with different young men. A tidy conclusion we don't get. But like life, "Everyone Says I Love You" is messy yet breathtaking. Without the musical angle, the film would still be among Allen's most agreeable works. It is a romantic comedy that sings, inhabiting every scene with characters we come to revere and with conversational interludes that rank as some of Allen's most sagacious. The film is screwball, but not chintzily so - it carries an energy reminiscent of times during which we might have been an observer to a different family's dynamic, totally in awe of their intricate relationships, the way in which they spoke to each other. The Dandridge clan isn't unlike most American families (maybe a little richer), and the sunny ideology that life can be a humorous thing is very much intact here. So the added touch of music and dance that "Everyone Says I Love You" provides is more than welcome, as the old cliché of characters breaking out into song actually seems fitting. Allen gets the tone we'd expect in the best of material like this: not too campy and not too self-serious, instead drifting along with arbitrary, feel-good shades and textures. We want to give it a bear hug, being so velvety, charming, and endearing in the ways a couple hours of reminiscing with family can be. With a soundtrack that includes "Making Whoopee" and "My Baby Just Cares For Me," the delivery by the actors, who normally aren't associated with the musical genre, steals our hearts. We can't get enough, as it should be with the Hollywood musical. "Everyone Says I Love You" climaxes in a beautifully rendered scene in which Goldie Hawn and Woody Allen slow dance like Astaire and Rogers by the Seine, Hawn flying in the air as if she were a trapeze artist, singing as wonderfully as an average person can, Allen turning into a dance partner of surprising merit. It is an unforgettable way to conclude an unforgettable film, perhaps one of the most daring of Allen's career but, all great works aside, among his finest. An underrated, humble masterpiece.

    "Everyone Says I Love You" differs from most modern musicals in that it doesn't aim to be grand in scope. It aims to be a throwback to the Technicolored, frenetic days of Gene Kelly and Cyd Charisse, albeit with dialogue and characters that directly reflect the modern attitudes of its writer, director, and star, Woody Allen. There is no thunderous imagery a la "Moulin Rouge!" (2001), and there are no Broadway sized numbers akin to "Chicago" (2002). It is small and intimate, its song and dance numbers giggling in the way they depict the average Joe belting as best they can, boogying with sweet conviction. Certainly, it is among Allen's best, most universal films - but few are able to recall it, as it came at the end of an era that didn't rake in as much critical and commercial acclaim as the decades preceding it. It makes use of a superb ensemble cast, putting most of its attention onto the fictional Dandridge family, a wealthy New York based bunch liberal and free-wheeling in their beliefs. The unit is headed by Bob (Alan Alda) and Steffi (Goldie Hawn), parents in the prime of middle-age that have retained an admirable zest for life. Together, they have four kids, the angsty Scott (Lukas Haas), who has decided to become a conservative Republican, the flaky Skylar (Drew Barrymore), and a pair of preteen girls, Lane (Gaby Hoffman) and Laura (Natalie Portman). Steffi's daughter DJ (Natasha Lyonne), the result of her previous marriage to writer Joe Berlin (Allen), narrates and co-stars. As the film opens, the family is facing rambunctious family drama better described as whimsical than serious. Skylar is getting married to the earnest Holden Spence (Edward Norton), but it so easily romantically persuaded that a lasting relationship may not be a very realistic place to go. Steffi, a lifelong rich girl who has devoted her entire adult life to social work, is in the process of attempting to get convict Charles Ferry (Tim Roth) released from prison, whom she believes is serving a sentence far from the result of fairness. Wanting to find love again, Joe hooks up with the much younger Von (Julia Roberts), a woman in the grips of an unhappy marriage; Laura and Lane are interested in the same boy; and DJ won't stop falling in love with different young men. A tidy conclusion we don't get. But like life, "Everyone Says I Love You" is messy yet breathtaking. Without the musical angle, the film would still be among Allen's most agreeable works. It is a romantic comedy that sings, inhabiting every scene with characters we come to revere and with conversational interludes that rank as some of Allen's most sagacious. The film is screwball, but not chintzily so - it carries an energy reminiscent of times during which we might have been an observer to a different family's dynamic, totally in awe of their intricate relationships, the way in which they spoke to each other. The Dandridge clan isn't unlike most American families (maybe a little richer), and the sunny ideology that life can be a humorous thing is very much intact here. So the added touch of music and dance that "Everyone Says I Love You" provides is more than welcome, as the old cliché of characters breaking out into song actually seems fitting. Allen gets the tone we'd expect in the best of material like this: not too campy and not too self-serious, instead drifting along with arbitrary, feel-good shades and textures. We want to give it a bear hug, being so velvety, charming, and endearing in the ways a couple hours of reminiscing with family can be. With a soundtrack that includes "Making Whoopee" and "My Baby Just Cares For Me," the delivery by the actors, who normally aren't associated with the musical genre, steals our hearts. We can't get enough, as it should be with the Hollywood musical. "Everyone Says I Love You" climaxes in a beautifully rendered scene in which Goldie Hawn and Woody Allen slow dance like Astaire and Rogers by the Seine, Hawn flying in the air as if she were a trapeze artist, singing as wonderfully as an average person can, Allen turning into a dance partner of surprising merit. It is an unforgettable way to conclude an unforgettable film, perhaps one of the most daring of Allen's career but, all great works aside, among his finest. An underrated, humble masterpiece.

  • Dec 16, 2015

    meni ekstremno dosadan!!!

    meni ekstremno dosadan!!!

  • Dec 09, 2015

    Such a wonderful movie, one of Woody's best.

    Such a wonderful movie, one of Woody's best.