Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close Reviews

  • Oct 07, 2020

    really depressing - only watch it if you're in the mood to cry your eyes out.

    really depressing - only watch it if you're in the mood to cry your eyes out.

  • May 22, 2020

    It seems 'overly sentimental ' is overly used for movies that wrench at your gut, as this one does. How can a movie about 9/11 not? Perhaps people don't want to relive it. I watched this with open eyes and mind, and consider it a great movie that truly deserved its nomination. The acting is spot on from all involved. One I will revisit from time to time, because this is a period in time we must never forget.

    It seems 'overly sentimental ' is overly used for movies that wrench at your gut, as this one does. How can a movie about 9/11 not? Perhaps people don't want to relive it. I watched this with open eyes and mind, and consider it a great movie that truly deserved its nomination. The acting is spot on from all involved. One I will revisit from time to time, because this is a period in time we must never forget.

  • Jan 01, 2020

    Scenes in this movie seemed to demand you to feel emotional despite being plainly pretentious, deepening any lack of interest you may have had. Easily the most un-enjoyable film ive ever watched.

    Scenes in this movie seemed to demand you to feel emotional despite being plainly pretentious, deepening any lack of interest you may have had. Easily the most un-enjoyable film ive ever watched.

  • Dec 30, 2019

    Powerful film. Once again the critics got it wrong. The performances are all superb.

    Powerful film. Once again the critics got it wrong. The performances are all superb.

  • Aug 08, 2019

    It is depressing to see an absolute legend like Max von Sydow, so great in The Emigrants (1972) and Hannah and Her Sisters (1986), stuck in a film this vacuous and emotionally manipulative. This is the third film that Stephen Daldry has made that I have found to be a truly discomforting viewing experience as both The Danish Girl (2015) and The Reader (2008) were equally exploitative of social issues without really saying anything about them. This is the sort of film that gives so-called Oscar bait a bad name as it features a host of famous faces who have done better work in other films, a director attached to previously successful films and the aggressive production of Scott Rudin. This is not a film worthy of being viewed despite the fact that it was nominated for Best Picture. An autistic young man Oskar Schell, Thomas Horn, is deeply emotionally impacted after 9/11 causes the death of his beloved father Thomas, Tom Hanks, who had encouraged him and supported him through ‘reconnaissance expeditions'. He discovers a key connected to the word ‘Black' that belonged to his father and sets off on a mission to find what the key unlocks by visiting every person with the surname ‘Black' in New York City. He is accompanied by the mysterious new inhabitant of his grandmother's house who is traumatized by past events in his life and therefore does not speak. His mission is meant to connect to the experiences of New Yorkers in the aftermath of 9/11 but this statement is not made in a way that feels tasteful or intelligent. The film's use of 9/11 is offensive because it is so obviously there to wring unearned emotional responses from it's audience while the film does little to explore the affects of this tragic event on society. We witness the event through the eyes of a dislikable and ultimately uninteresting main character who doesn't seem changed by meeting New Yorker's who are sympathetic to his plight. The New Yorkers we do meet are underdeveloped ideas as we are meant to believe that the ‘collateral beauty' that came out of 9/11 was New Yorkers banding together to take care of those affected by the event like Schell. This isn't something that the film delves into with any depth however as other than witnessing construction workers allowing him to use their equipment we don't really see them support him and there was never a moment where emotional catharsis was reached between these seemingly disparate people united by an event. The fact that the film never really addresses the issue it purports to be about and yet expects you to believe that it is capital I "Important" was what really irked me. The lead performance is also an issue as while the writing does not serve Horn, Schell is more a collection of tics and ‘funny' quirks than a character, he does come off as shrill and one note in his line delivery making it difficult for us to engage with him. Other performers in the film do not fare particularly well either as Hanks and Bullock are gifted with the most cliché dialogue to work with as the loving but hapless parents. It is telling that only von Sydow was nominated for an Academy Award for his performance as nobody else in the film really stands out enough for their work to be worthy of recognition and the film as a whole is an atrocity. If you want a film from 2011 that tackles the aftermath of 9/11 in a way that feels unique and interesting is Margaret (2011) which I believe to a masterpiece. That film lets the issue lurk in the background as we see the way that this event has subtly crept into the various elements of the lives of New Yorkers as they argue about the issue in philosophy class and reference it during dinner parties. Yes, it may be less direct than Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close but it actually says something about how these people dealt with their grief and how the horror touched all people. This is a film that is worth watching and unfortunately the more recognized film to discuss the issue was terrible.

    It is depressing to see an absolute legend like Max von Sydow, so great in The Emigrants (1972) and Hannah and Her Sisters (1986), stuck in a film this vacuous and emotionally manipulative. This is the third film that Stephen Daldry has made that I have found to be a truly discomforting viewing experience as both The Danish Girl (2015) and The Reader (2008) were equally exploitative of social issues without really saying anything about them. This is the sort of film that gives so-called Oscar bait a bad name as it features a host of famous faces who have done better work in other films, a director attached to previously successful films and the aggressive production of Scott Rudin. This is not a film worthy of being viewed despite the fact that it was nominated for Best Picture. An autistic young man Oskar Schell, Thomas Horn, is deeply emotionally impacted after 9/11 causes the death of his beloved father Thomas, Tom Hanks, who had encouraged him and supported him through ‘reconnaissance expeditions'. He discovers a key connected to the word ‘Black' that belonged to his father and sets off on a mission to find what the key unlocks by visiting every person with the surname ‘Black' in New York City. He is accompanied by the mysterious new inhabitant of his grandmother's house who is traumatized by past events in his life and therefore does not speak. His mission is meant to connect to the experiences of New Yorkers in the aftermath of 9/11 but this statement is not made in a way that feels tasteful or intelligent. The film's use of 9/11 is offensive because it is so obviously there to wring unearned emotional responses from it's audience while the film does little to explore the affects of this tragic event on society. We witness the event through the eyes of a dislikable and ultimately uninteresting main character who doesn't seem changed by meeting New Yorker's who are sympathetic to his plight. The New Yorkers we do meet are underdeveloped ideas as we are meant to believe that the ‘collateral beauty' that came out of 9/11 was New Yorkers banding together to take care of those affected by the event like Schell. This isn't something that the film delves into with any depth however as other than witnessing construction workers allowing him to use their equipment we don't really see them support him and there was never a moment where emotional catharsis was reached between these seemingly disparate people united by an event. The fact that the film never really addresses the issue it purports to be about and yet expects you to believe that it is capital I "Important" was what really irked me. The lead performance is also an issue as while the writing does not serve Horn, Schell is more a collection of tics and ‘funny' quirks than a character, he does come off as shrill and one note in his line delivery making it difficult for us to engage with him. Other performers in the film do not fare particularly well either as Hanks and Bullock are gifted with the most cliché dialogue to work with as the loving but hapless parents. It is telling that only von Sydow was nominated for an Academy Award for his performance as nobody else in the film really stands out enough for their work to be worthy of recognition and the film as a whole is an atrocity. If you want a film from 2011 that tackles the aftermath of 9/11 in a way that feels unique and interesting is Margaret (2011) which I believe to a masterpiece. That film lets the issue lurk in the background as we see the way that this event has subtly crept into the various elements of the lives of New Yorkers as they argue about the issue in philosophy class and reference it during dinner parties. Yes, it may be less direct than Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close but it actually says something about how these people dealt with their grief and how the horror touched all people. This is a film that is worth watching and unfortunately the more recognized film to discuss the issue was terrible.

  • Jul 24, 2019

    Best adaptation I've ever seen... especially because the book was a hybrid, it presented certain screenwriting challenges. Certain plot major plot points were changed in order to retain the emotional truth the book conveyed, and the emotional truth is where the heart and truth of a story truly lies. I think the changes in plot wise on the writers part. And the book is my favorite book, so I didn't think I'd ever be saying that.

    Best adaptation I've ever seen... especially because the book was a hybrid, it presented certain screenwriting challenges. Certain plot major plot points were changed in order to retain the emotional truth the book conveyed, and the emotional truth is where the heart and truth of a story truly lies. I think the changes in plot wise on the writers part. And the book is my favorite book, so I didn't think I'd ever be saying that.

  • Jan 30, 2019

    1.5/5. Most of the supporting actors are solid, but the main character is just so insufferable it makes this film nearly unwatchable. How it got nominated for Best Picture I will never understand.

    1.5/5. Most of the supporting actors are solid, but the main character is just so insufferable it makes this film nearly unwatchable. How it got nominated for Best Picture I will never understand.

  • Dec 10, 2018

    I had to watch it in class and it gave me Ligma 2.5 dead furries out of 5

    I had to watch it in class and it gave me Ligma 2.5 dead furries out of 5

  • Nov 07, 2018

    This film was almost good.

    This film was almost good.

  • Aug 24, 2018

    through the lens.. Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close Extremely Loud And Extremely Close is a character driven feature about the repercussions that a terrorism breeds on a much simpler mind. The premise has potential enough to withhold the audience for its runtime since its contradictory nature that plays irony and satire calculatively but in excessive amount. Its structure is benign and questionable and its tour de manipulative emotions that are drawn out from cheap shots. But in its own sketchy terms, it is utterly electrifying to the core with sensitive material that is respected with brilliant material. The conversations may be pragmatic but few liners hits hard and draws out most of the emotions from its skill to play with words like a puppet. The makers are aware of its poignant concept, pathos and vulnerable characters whose fragile and innocent relationship is explored layer by layer in here which works most of the part like an onion; peeling off will result into tears. The places the features visit is also a bit obnoxious but the procedure it follows to shift from one sequence to another is the key. The background score is decent with a camera work that is pleasant and appropriately handled with beautiful locations, bright colors and stunning visuals. On the other hand, it is short on cinematography, sound department, production design and editing. Hanks is supportive, Bullock is achingly good with an amazing support from Sydow and the convincing and troubled protagonist Horn. Daldry has grown mature on his execution skills no matter how much the script overchews, he elevates the heart rate of the viewers and keeps them rooting for the characters. Plethora of emotions, character's perspective and sharp and edgy one liners are the high points of the feature. Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close is an essential tale about the nature of humanity that is peeked through the lens of a persona that is unaware of the terms and conditions of the society.

    through the lens.. Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close Extremely Loud And Extremely Close is a character driven feature about the repercussions that a terrorism breeds on a much simpler mind. The premise has potential enough to withhold the audience for its runtime since its contradictory nature that plays irony and satire calculatively but in excessive amount. Its structure is benign and questionable and its tour de manipulative emotions that are drawn out from cheap shots. But in its own sketchy terms, it is utterly electrifying to the core with sensitive material that is respected with brilliant material. The conversations may be pragmatic but few liners hits hard and draws out most of the emotions from its skill to play with words like a puppet. The makers are aware of its poignant concept, pathos and vulnerable characters whose fragile and innocent relationship is explored layer by layer in here which works most of the part like an onion; peeling off will result into tears. The places the features visit is also a bit obnoxious but the procedure it follows to shift from one sequence to another is the key. The background score is decent with a camera work that is pleasant and appropriately handled with beautiful locations, bright colors and stunning visuals. On the other hand, it is short on cinematography, sound department, production design and editing. Hanks is supportive, Bullock is achingly good with an amazing support from Sydow and the convincing and troubled protagonist Horn. Daldry has grown mature on his execution skills no matter how much the script overchews, he elevates the heart rate of the viewers and keeps them rooting for the characters. Plethora of emotions, character's perspective and sharp and edgy one liners are the high points of the feature. Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close is an essential tale about the nature of humanity that is peeked through the lens of a persona that is unaware of the terms and conditions of the society.