Father and Son Reviews

  • Feb 16, 2014

    Haunting and sensual. Can a father and son really relate that way? Can anyone? Confronting and inspiring.

    Haunting and sensual. Can a father and son really relate that way? Can anyone? Confronting and inspiring.

  • Apr 14, 2012

    Strange and bewildering, yet somehow beautiful. The poetic atmosphere keeps it going.

    Strange and bewildering, yet somehow beautiful. The poetic atmosphere keeps it going.

  • Aug 24, 2011

    Although the film is quite complex for an average movie watcher, I'd say that it's able to deliver a beautiful portrayal of absolute love of a son towards his father. I would recommend to watch this film with an open-mind...

    Although the film is quite complex for an average movie watcher, I'd say that it's able to deliver a beautiful portrayal of absolute love of a son towards his father. I would recommend to watch this film with an open-mind...

  • Apr 29, 2011

    Avant-garde to the extreme, this film plays out like it really wants to be a smart, artistic film with beautiful imagery and little dialogue, but it really just comes off banal and a half-assed attempt at something truly poetic. Everything symbolic feels trite or so dense that Sokurov's metaphors are lost within everything else. Only a couple of moments did I feel like I was starting to understand what he was trying to say before he went and lost me again. Honestly, it felt like I was watching a foreign meldorama disguised as a foreign art film. There's a great deal of talk about the homo-erotic qualities to it; there are moments, but I could feel what he was trying to do was comment on the relationship of a father and his son and what that ultimately means, but all that needed to be subtext wasn't and all that needed to be said wasn't said at all. Whatever he was trying to convey, it got lost in his passion for trying to say it in the first place. The only thing I came out of it with was some nice cinematography.

    Avant-garde to the extreme, this film plays out like it really wants to be a smart, artistic film with beautiful imagery and little dialogue, but it really just comes off banal and a half-assed attempt at something truly poetic. Everything symbolic feels trite or so dense that Sokurov's metaphors are lost within everything else. Only a couple of moments did I feel like I was starting to understand what he was trying to say before he went and lost me again. Honestly, it felt like I was watching a foreign meldorama disguised as a foreign art film. There's a great deal of talk about the homo-erotic qualities to it; there are moments, but I could feel what he was trying to do was comment on the relationship of a father and his son and what that ultimately means, but all that needed to be subtext wasn't and all that needed to be said wasn't said at all. Whatever he was trying to convey, it got lost in his passion for trying to say it in the first place. The only thing I came out of it with was some nice cinematography.

  • Jun 13, 2010

    Alexander Sokurov made a big name for himself with "Russian Ark" a.k.a. that film that was done in a single take. His next film "Father And Son" is a disappointment, intended to be the 2nd part of a trilogy with his eloquent 1997 film "Mother And Son" and a future film yet to be made, this one focuses on the titular relationship. It's a nice looking film concerning the love/hate relationship between military student Alexei and his lonely father, however there are a few scenes which added little to nothing, the acting was OK the dialogue feels a little forced and the alleged homoeroticism (a term which only comes up whenever two men have their shirt off) has put plenty of people off. Even for a relatively short film it seems to drag quite hard, that lack of focus doesn't help either. It works OK as a visual poem/psychological study, watch "Mother And Son" instead, or Andrei Zvyagintsev's "The Return".

    Alexander Sokurov made a big name for himself with "Russian Ark" a.k.a. that film that was done in a single take. His next film "Father And Son" is a disappointment, intended to be the 2nd part of a trilogy with his eloquent 1997 film "Mother And Son" and a future film yet to be made, this one focuses on the titular relationship. It's a nice looking film concerning the love/hate relationship between military student Alexei and his lonely father, however there are a few scenes which added little to nothing, the acting was OK the dialogue feels a little forced and the alleged homoeroticism (a term which only comes up whenever two men have their shirt off) has put plenty of people off. Even for a relatively short film it seems to drag quite hard, that lack of focus doesn't help either. It works OK as a visual poem/psychological study, watch "Mother And Son" instead, or Andrei Zvyagintsev's "The Return".

  • May 25, 2010

    I wasn't going to review this, but seeing the comments below I was kind of forced to. This film works brilliantly on a number of levels, but I'll limit myself to just two; 1. For those looking for plot and missing it, trying looking at this as the story of Jesus Christ *before* he was born on Earth. That is the father and son relationship inherent and repeating itself since God 'created' Adam (was anyone ever bothered by Michelangelo's representation of that fatherly and sonly love?). That same story is the story of a son growing up, finding his own shoes instead of trying to step into his father's and, no, this story does not have an ending in a classical sense. but it has a beginning where the ending should be and I take that any day. 2. For those looking for substance, just look past the symbolism (which btw draws masterfully on the legacy of Tarkovsky, Felini, etc.) and think that this story has never (to my knowledge) been told like this before. Sure, Russian literature and film are full of examples of father-son relations (too many examples to mention), but for me this was the first time it had been explored from this unique viewpoint of mutual tenderness, love and compassion. In short, whatever your relationship with your father was or is, think whether you would not want to dwell on the experience of 'Father and Son' when dealing with your own possible fatherhood. And I'm not being sexist here - current, future and potential mothers may discover a side of masculinity here that they may not even have know that they were missing.

    I wasn't going to review this, but seeing the comments below I was kind of forced to. This film works brilliantly on a number of levels, but I'll limit myself to just two; 1. For those looking for plot and missing it, trying looking at this as the story of Jesus Christ *before* he was born on Earth. That is the father and son relationship inherent and repeating itself since God 'created' Adam (was anyone ever bothered by Michelangelo's representation of that fatherly and sonly love?). That same story is the story of a son growing up, finding his own shoes instead of trying to step into his father's and, no, this story does not have an ending in a classical sense. but it has a beginning where the ending should be and I take that any day. 2. For those looking for substance, just look past the symbolism (which btw draws masterfully on the legacy of Tarkovsky, Felini, etc.) and think that this story has never (to my knowledge) been told like this before. Sure, Russian literature and film are full of examples of father-son relations (too many examples to mention), but for me this was the first time it had been explored from this unique viewpoint of mutual tenderness, love and compassion. In short, whatever your relationship with your father was or is, think whether you would not want to dwell on the experience of 'Father and Son' when dealing with your own possible fatherhood. And I'm not being sexist here - current, future and potential mothers may discover a side of masculinity here that they may not even have know that they were missing.

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    John B Super Reviewer
    Jan 05, 2010

    Huh. An interesting product from Sokurov. I'm actually beginning to wonder if I have seen any Russian films other than from Sokurov. Here we have a very interesting relationship between a father and son that seems to border on relationship territory. Throw in a girlfriend and things are really weird..particularly in those long looks.

    Huh. An interesting product from Sokurov. I'm actually beginning to wonder if I have seen any Russian films other than from Sokurov. Here we have a very interesting relationship between a father and son that seems to border on relationship territory. Throw in a girlfriend and things are really weird..particularly in those long looks.

  • Oct 05, 2009

    Aleksandr Sokurov's banal "Father and Son" plays like a parody of an art film, featuring an absurd number of longing glances, and repetitive symbolism that lacks profundity. It's a rather shallow misfire, dressed to impress in order to hide a lack of insight.

    Aleksandr Sokurov's banal "Father and Son" plays like a parody of an art film, featuring an absurd number of longing glances, and repetitive symbolism that lacks profundity. It's a rather shallow misfire, dressed to impress in order to hide a lack of insight.

  • Jul 27, 2009

    nkkigrrl28 (edit) A Russian film that is erotic, enigmatic, and baffling. No plot, dialogue that serves more as poetic musings, and visually dreamy and gorgeous. People never just look at each other but gaze at each other, and the two leads are heavily muscled and mostly topless throughout the film. The backdrops are spectacular: a dreamily lit flat, the incredibly steep rooftop outside where the father and son leap about, the tall, squished-together buildings of their port city, the train and it's intricate levers and buttons...This film is more enjoyable if experienced like a dream: an experience about deep feelings, the deep psychic bond between a father and his son, and the sadness, loneliness, and fear for both when the son begins to detach from this bond to pursue a bond with a woman. The unusually intense connection between the father and the son borders on erotic, and it almost feels like viewers are being made deliberately disturbed by the intensity of certain scenes. Not overtly explicit or sexual. Very arty film: definitely an acquired taste. A Russian film that is erotic, enigmatic, and baffling. No plot, dialogue that serves more as poetic musings, and visually dreamy and gorgeous. People never just look at each other but gaze at each other, and the two leads are heavily muscled and mostly topless throughout the film. The backdrops are spectacular: a dreamily lit flat, the incredibly steep rooftop outside where the father and son leap about, the tall, squished-together buildings of their port city, the train and it's intricate levers and buttons...This film is more enjoyable if experienced like a dream: an experience about deep feelings, the deep psychic bond between a father and his son, and the sadness, loneliness, and fear for both when the son begins to detach from this bond to pursue a bond with a woman. The unusually intense connection between the father and the son borders on erotic, and it almost feels like viewers are being made deliberately disturbed by the intensity of certain scenes. Not overtly explicit or sexual. Very arty film: definitely an acquired taste. clear rating

    nkkigrrl28 (edit) A Russian film that is erotic, enigmatic, and baffling. No plot, dialogue that serves more as poetic musings, and visually dreamy and gorgeous. People never just look at each other but gaze at each other, and the two leads are heavily muscled and mostly topless throughout the film. The backdrops are spectacular: a dreamily lit flat, the incredibly steep rooftop outside where the father and son leap about, the tall, squished-together buildings of their port city, the train and it's intricate levers and buttons...This film is more enjoyable if experienced like a dream: an experience about deep feelings, the deep psychic bond between a father and his son, and the sadness, loneliness, and fear for both when the son begins to detach from this bond to pursue a bond with a woman. The unusually intense connection between the father and the son borders on erotic, and it almost feels like viewers are being made deliberately disturbed by the intensity of certain scenes. Not overtly explicit or sexual. Very arty film: definitely an acquired taste. A Russian film that is erotic, enigmatic, and baffling. No plot, dialogue that serves more as poetic musings, and visually dreamy and gorgeous. People never just look at each other but gaze at each other, and the two leads are heavily muscled and mostly topless throughout the film. The backdrops are spectacular: a dreamily lit flat, the incredibly steep rooftop outside where the father and son leap about, the tall, squished-together buildings of their port city, the train and it's intricate levers and buttons...This film is more enjoyable if experienced like a dream: an experience about deep feelings, the deep psychic bond between a father and his son, and the sadness, loneliness, and fear for both when the son begins to detach from this bond to pursue a bond with a woman. The unusually intense connection between the father and the son borders on erotic, and it almost feels like viewers are being made deliberately disturbed by the intensity of certain scenes. Not overtly explicit or sexual. Very arty film: definitely an acquired taste. clear rating

  • Jul 27, 2009

    A Russian film that is erotic, enigmatic, and baffling. No plot, dialogue that serves more as poetic musings, and visually dreamy and gorgeous. People never just look at each other but gaze at each other, and the two leads are heavily muscled and mostly topless throughout the film. The backdrops are spectacular: a dreamily lit flat, the incredibly steep rooftop outside where the father and son leap about, the tall, squished-together buildings of their port city, the train and it's intricate levers and buttons...This film is more enjoyable if experienced like a dream: an experience about deep feelings, the deep psychic bond between a father and his son, and the sadness, loneliness, and fear for both when the son begins to detach from this bond to pursue a bond with a woman. The unusually intense connection between the father and the son borders on erotic, and it almost feels like viewers are being made deliberately disturbed by the intensity of certain scenes. Not overtly explicit or sexual. Very arty film: definitely an acquired taste.

    A Russian film that is erotic, enigmatic, and baffling. No plot, dialogue that serves more as poetic musings, and visually dreamy and gorgeous. People never just look at each other but gaze at each other, and the two leads are heavily muscled and mostly topless throughout the film. The backdrops are spectacular: a dreamily lit flat, the incredibly steep rooftop outside where the father and son leap about, the tall, squished-together buildings of their port city, the train and it's intricate levers and buttons...This film is more enjoyable if experienced like a dream: an experience about deep feelings, the deep psychic bond between a father and his son, and the sadness, loneliness, and fear for both when the son begins to detach from this bond to pursue a bond with a woman. The unusually intense connection between the father and the son borders on erotic, and it almost feels like viewers are being made deliberately disturbed by the intensity of certain scenes. Not overtly explicit or sexual. Very arty film: definitely an acquired taste.