Faubourg Tremé: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans Reviews

  • Oct 08, 2008

    While this is, on its face, a history of one neighborhood in New Orleans, Faubourg Treme tells a much bigger story. Treme was home to the largest number of free people of color in the Deep South, and was also home to the first black daily newspaper in the United States. The famous Plessy vs. Ferguson case came out of Treme, as did a new kind of music -- Jazz. The film goes on to show the devastation to the community caused by the urban renewal in the 1960s, drugs in the 1980s, and Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Highly recommended.

    While this is, on its face, a history of one neighborhood in New Orleans, Faubourg Treme tells a much bigger story. Treme was home to the largest number of free people of color in the Deep South, and was also home to the first black daily newspaper in the United States. The famous Plessy vs. Ferguson case came out of Treme, as did a new kind of music -- Jazz. The film goes on to show the devastation to the community caused by the urban renewal in the 1960s, drugs in the 1980s, and Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Highly recommended.

  • Aug 06, 2008

    A great historical view of the neighborhood that brings us up to date on what is happening in New Orleans now in the wake of Katrina. This is an insider's view that pulls no punches. It is sad but also hopeful. Highly recommended.

    A great historical view of the neighborhood that brings us up to date on what is happening in New Orleans now in the wake of Katrina. This is an insider's view that pulls no punches. It is sad but also hopeful. Highly recommended.

  • Jul 13, 2008

    a beautiful, beautiful documentary. wonderful storytelling.

    a beautiful, beautiful documentary. wonderful storytelling.

  • Jun 13, 2008

    The movie takes a huge topic - Black New Orleans - and comes at it from a bunch of angles. The arts, social and political history, and a personal narrative. It's all unavoidably overshadowed by the Katrina and post-Katrina chapter (the hurricane happened several years into the process of the film). Maybe it's a little disjointed, but it's like getting punched in the stomach, too, which means it's about as effective as a film can hope to be.

    The movie takes a huge topic - Black New Orleans - and comes at it from a bunch of angles. The arts, social and political history, and a personal narrative. It's all unavoidably overshadowed by the Katrina and post-Katrina chapter (the hurricane happened several years into the process of the film). Maybe it's a little disjointed, but it's like getting punched in the stomach, too, which means it's about as effective as a film can hope to be.

  • May 14, 2008

    Directors Dawn Logsdon and Lolils Eric Elie (also wearing the writing cap) have given a historical perspective of the neighborhood of Treme in New Orleans, outside the French Quarter. What started as a project pre-Katrina, the duo showcase the rich past that African Americans have had in this city. Filled with historical surprises, current interviews and poignant footage of the current state, this is a film that should be watched by all Americans.

    Directors Dawn Logsdon and Lolils Eric Elie (also wearing the writing cap) have given a historical perspective of the neighborhood of Treme in New Orleans, outside the French Quarter. What started as a project pre-Katrina, the duo showcase the rich past that African Americans have had in this city. Filled with historical surprises, current interviews and poignant footage of the current state, this is a film that should be watched by all Americans.