Fido - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Fido Reviews

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Andrew Wright
The Stranger (Seattle, WA)
July 4, 2007
Boasts a premise that might make for an amusing Far Side panel -- '50s suburbia with zombie servants -- and... doesn't do much else with it, actually.
Josh Larsen
Sun Publications (Chicago, IL)
June 26, 2007
...picks up where Shaun of the Dead left off.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Jonathan W. Hickman
Entertainment Insiders
June 23, 2007
Director Andrew Currie's film is great looking with vivid colors and perfect 1950s set pieces.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Top Critic
Richard Roeper
Ebert & Roeper
June 18, 2007
Fido is a one-joke movie with some good performances and a few good gross-out moments. But it's not dark enough or sick enough to be a cult favorite.
Pete Hammond
Maxim
June 16, 2007
The concept is great and the movie has its moments. Just not enough of them.
| Original Score: 2.5/5
Bob Strauss
Los Angeles Daily News
June 16, 2007
This Technicolor goof on parallel-universe nostalgia has a serious timing problem. It plays like a '50s sitcom, and not the good, I Love Lucy kind.
| Original Score: 2/4
Bill Gibron
PopMatters
June 15, 2007
Fido [is] a wildly entertaining comedy. It has as much humor as horror, and a wonderfully wonky way of making its many cogent social critiques.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/5
Top Critic
Manohla Dargis
New York Times
June 15, 2007
In the ticklishly amusing satire Fido, the undead stagger along like stunned toddlers.
| Original Score: 3.5/5
June 15, 2007
It's just a clever, pointed little fable about the price of complacent conformity, slavish worship of the status quo, and trading freedom for the illusion of safety, wrapped in a sugary-sweet, Jordan-almond-colored coating that looks good enough to eat.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Top Critic
Lisa Rose
Newark Star-Ledger
June 15, 2007
Fido does offer a good number of laughs, along with a healthy serving of gore to satisfy horror fans.
| Original Score: 2.5/4
Top Critic
Lou Lumenick
New York Post
June 15, 2007
The main joke here is that Connolly's Fido, though he never speaks, seems more alive than the rigidly conformist '50s males around him. It's not quite enough to keep Fido more than a slight comedy.
| Original Score: 2/4
Shlomo Schwartzberg
Boxoffice Magazine
June 15, 2007
The film retreats to political allegory -- evocations of the Bush administration's so-called fear-mongering on terrorism -- and obvious pot shots at family values. More than anything, Fido is a missed opportunity.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/5
Top Critic
Elizabeth Weitzman
New York Daily News
June 15, 2007
Definitely the most fun you'll have with the undead this week.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Top Critic
Robert Abele
Los Angeles Times
June 14, 2007
A crafty mixture of George Romero and Douglas Sirk, Fido is a boy and his zombie movie that may have an unusually pastoral color scheme but tears into its many satirical targets with the vigor of a freshly reborn flesh-eater.
Full Review | Original Score: 4.5/5
Frank Swietek
One Guy's Opinion
June 14, 2007
Stretches its one-joke premise and artificial look beyond the breaking point.
Full Review | Original Score: C
Top Critic
John Anderson
Newsday
June 14, 2007
Fido, which feels original despite borrowing from a half-dozen genres, shouldn't be taken too seriously.
| Original Score: 3/4
Lewis Beale
Film Journal International
June 14, 2007
There's nothing here that couldn't have been done better in an eight-minute sketch on "Saturday Night Live."
Top Critic
Peter Travers
Rolling Stone
June 14, 2007
Director Andrew Currie is better at laughs than scares, but he can't sustain either as Fido runs out of steam in the final stretch.
| Original Score: 2.5/4
Katherine Monk
Edmonton Journal
June 13, 2007
It's a colourful and clever recreation of genre that comes at just the right moment, as society looks deep into the rancid maw of death and rediscovers the value of life.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Michael D. Reid
Victoria Times Colonist (B.C., Canada)
June 13, 2007
While Fido isn't without a severed limb or a splash of blood, the emphasis here is on amusement and visual style, with the terror emanating more from social commentary than gore.
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