Fighter Reviews

  • Mar 07, 2015

    I do t let you watch it

    I do t let you watch it

  • Marcus W Super Reviewer
    Jul 23, 2013

    This Danish, muslim kung-fu movie may tread a worn path, but it's an always watchable path.

    This Danish, muslim kung-fu movie may tread a worn path, but it's an always watchable path.

  • Jan 01, 2013

    As an attempt to make a Danish "Bend it like Beckham" it fails completely. Where "Bend it..." underlines both the pressure from the immigrant cultures AND the British racism, "Fighter" only problemize the Turkish culture and put it in contrast to a liberal positive Danish culture thereby in the end reinforcing racist view in Danish that the problems solely lies in the backward culture of the immigrants. Beside that, the story, acting and choreography just ain't that good. All in all a bad movie.

    As an attempt to make a Danish "Bend it like Beckham" it fails completely. Where "Bend it..." underlines both the pressure from the immigrant cultures AND the British racism, "Fighter" only problemize the Turkish culture and put it in contrast to a liberal positive Danish culture thereby in the end reinforcing racist view in Danish that the problems solely lies in the backward culture of the immigrants. Beside that, the story, acting and choreography just ain't that good. All in all a bad movie.

  • Nov 13, 2012

    no new tale 2 tell here but still watchable.

    no new tale 2 tell here but still watchable.

  • Sep 03, 2012

    There's a boy on the poster, but "Fighter" is actually about a girl, a Turkish muslim who wants to study kung fu in defiance of her conservative father's insistence that this is not a proper pursuit for girls, and that she should not be sacrificing her academic career to it anyway. I thought the film would be yet another remake of "The Karate Kid", but it is more a kind of "Bend It Like Bruce Lee", a sport-centered story of romantic and family relations in a context of clashing cultures. It is about martial arts, though, and it does have training and fight sequences. Most of them involve wirework, which is quite surprising given the realistic tone of the film. Maybe the director is giving us a subjective point of view, showing us what her protagonist believes she is doing, rather than what she actually does. But don't expect too much of a deep relationship between the heroine and her sensei. Though he imparts some epigrammatic Miyagi-style wisdom, he does not have much screen time, and his relationship with his student is not the main focus of the film. What seems to interest the movie makers is rather the plight of this Turkish immigrant in Copenhagen, torn between her father's aspirations for her and her own, between her religion and the libertinism of Denmark's youth, between her loyalties to her siblings and her loyalty to herself. The film is shot like an episode of 24 with quite a few MTV-like montages, which I found rather annoying, though the fast editing and the all the shaking and frantic zooming nicely capture the protagonist's angst. Fortunately, those stylistic choices were compensated for me by an interesting script about engaging characters in an intriguing mix of cultures.

    There's a boy on the poster, but "Fighter" is actually about a girl, a Turkish muslim who wants to study kung fu in defiance of her conservative father's insistence that this is not a proper pursuit for girls, and that she should not be sacrificing her academic career to it anyway. I thought the film would be yet another remake of "The Karate Kid", but it is more a kind of "Bend It Like Bruce Lee", a sport-centered story of romantic and family relations in a context of clashing cultures. It is about martial arts, though, and it does have training and fight sequences. Most of them involve wirework, which is quite surprising given the realistic tone of the film. Maybe the director is giving us a subjective point of view, showing us what her protagonist believes she is doing, rather than what she actually does. But don't expect too much of a deep relationship between the heroine and her sensei. Though he imparts some epigrammatic Miyagi-style wisdom, he does not have much screen time, and his relationship with his student is not the main focus of the film. What seems to interest the movie makers is rather the plight of this Turkish immigrant in Copenhagen, torn between her father's aspirations for her and her own, between her religion and the libertinism of Denmark's youth, between her loyalties to her siblings and her loyalty to herself. The film is shot like an episode of 24 with quite a few MTV-like montages, which I found rather annoying, though the fast editing and the all the shaking and frantic zooming nicely capture the protagonist's angst. Fortunately, those stylistic choices were compensated for me by an interesting script about engaging characters in an intriguing mix of cultures.

  • May 12, 2012

    Awesome show. I wanted to see more but it ended :) Front pic should be of her not the guy as it is about Aicha not this bruiser on the cover.

    Awesome show. I wanted to see more but it ended :) Front pic should be of her not the guy as it is about Aicha not this bruiser on the cover.

  • Dec 28, 2011

    a nice little surprise. semra turam (aisha) is a lovely, strong woman caught between the traditions of her muslim family and her teenage angst, coupled with her desire to be a kung fu fighter. it's a somewhat predictable plotline but exciting fight scenes and semras' expressive and exotic face take it up a notch for me. everyone in the film is actually very interesting to look at, for beauty and lines and expressions of anger and joy. the fight scenes are beautiful and she is a great looking fighter, both in the ring and as she fights demons and ninjas in her mind.

    a nice little surprise. semra turam (aisha) is a lovely, strong woman caught between the traditions of her muslim family and her teenage angst, coupled with her desire to be a kung fu fighter. it's a somewhat predictable plotline but exciting fight scenes and semras' expressive and exotic face take it up a notch for me. everyone in the film is actually very interesting to look at, for beauty and lines and expressions of anger and joy. the fight scenes are beautiful and she is a great looking fighter, both in the ring and as she fights demons and ninjas in her mind.

  • Dec 15, 2011

    dreadful....................... martial arts crapy vesion of bend it like beckham

    dreadful....................... martial arts crapy vesion of bend it like beckham

  • Oct 10, 2011

    A well made, fast paced action film with a twist. The main protagonist is a Turkish girl who learns Kung Fu and becomes a champion. Her family are conservative and as a result she has an even more difficult time along her way to victory.

    A well made, fast paced action film with a twist. The main protagonist is a Turkish girl who learns Kung Fu and becomes a champion. Her family are conservative and as a result she has an even more difficult time along her way to victory.

  • Jan 24, 2011

    The story of Micky "Irish" Ward and his boxing career with his crack addicted brother at his side. Apparently Marky Mark was so hell bent on getting this film made that he stayed in "shape" for years and years just in case the film went into production. That's dedication and passion for you, yet the man still manages to be the weak link. It's not really his fault, David O. Russell packed the film with a lot of talent. Christian Bale plays Dicky Ecklund, Micky's crack addicted brother who tells the same story over and over again, about him knocking out Sugar Ray Leonard. It's his claim to fame. There is a film crew following him around, he thinks it's going to be about his comeback, yet it's really about the harsh realities of crack addiction. Bale, again, submerses himself in the role. He is pure method. You can not like him as a person, or even an actor, but you can't deny his passion for the art. He is on the thin side again, with thin balding hair and brown teeth. He looks deathly ill in every scene. The man has one of his finest roles to date and will no doubt be nominated come award season. I hope he actually takes home the award. He is without a doubt, the most interesting character in the film. Their mother is played by Melissa Leo, another performance worthy of recognition come award season. Her desire to see her kids rise to fame blind her from the truth. She denies the drugs and the failures and believes she knows what's best for her kids. This means not letting them get a real chance because it would be with a real manager and she would be left behind. Family is important to her and she wants to keep everyone very close, even if it harms their chance at making a name for themselves. She of course, doesn't realize this. Amy Adams is the love interest, you know there had to be one. She manages to pull Micky away from the family that is dragging him down. They don't like her for it. She has her own inspirations too, yet the story isn't interested in them. The main focus of the film is with Micky's bumpy road to the championship fight. Since this is based on a true story, I can't really fault it for becoming a bit formulaic and predictable, yet it is. David O. Russell is notorious for getting angry and violent with his crew/cast. He was in a physical fight with George Clooney on the set of Three Kings and anyone can go on youtube and check out the melt down he and Lily Tomlin had on the set of I Heart Huckabees. Both films coincidentally star Mark Walhberg, so it seems he doesn't have a problem working with the combative director. I can't deny that the man has talent. I really love Three Kings and found I Heart Huckabees to be an ambitious project for the sheer weirdness of it all. With The Fighter, he plays to a more conventional audience. In terms of boxing films, it works. It plays on the down and out character, the poverty of his life and the sheer determination he has to make a name for himself. It's no Rocky, or as others have mentioned Raging Bull, but it is good enough to be mentioned with them. Russell always has an eye for a creative shot. Check out Three Kings colour scheme for what I mean. Here he uses TV cameras for the boxing matches. Interesting move, it feels like we are watching it at home and are not really in the ring with them. I admire directors who think outside of the box. Russell does this, no problem. He also decides to include real footage of the characters. The film has some home video segments throughout and during the credits we get to meet the real Micky Ward and Dicky Eckland, which is even more reason to appreciate Bale's performance. The film trips a bit because of the lack of emotion from Walhberg. I dig the guy and enjoy his films, but his range isn't there yet. When given a role that he can play the absurdity of, he scores. Watch The Departed for that. For a film where the audience needs to get behind a character, to root and cheer for them to overcome their obstacles, he falls a little short. Thank goodness the film makes up for this with the performances from Bale and Leo. The Fighter features great music, engaging performances and a predictable, yet true story. I felt attached to the characters and hoping they would make smart decisions. If a film can get me to care about the characters, I say bravo. The Fighter is a winner in my books.

    The story of Micky "Irish" Ward and his boxing career with his crack addicted brother at his side. Apparently Marky Mark was so hell bent on getting this film made that he stayed in "shape" for years and years just in case the film went into production. That's dedication and passion for you, yet the man still manages to be the weak link. It's not really his fault, David O. Russell packed the film with a lot of talent. Christian Bale plays Dicky Ecklund, Micky's crack addicted brother who tells the same story over and over again, about him knocking out Sugar Ray Leonard. It's his claim to fame. There is a film crew following him around, he thinks it's going to be about his comeback, yet it's really about the harsh realities of crack addiction. Bale, again, submerses himself in the role. He is pure method. You can not like him as a person, or even an actor, but you can't deny his passion for the art. He is on the thin side again, with thin balding hair and brown teeth. He looks deathly ill in every scene. The man has one of his finest roles to date and will no doubt be nominated come award season. I hope he actually takes home the award. He is without a doubt, the most interesting character in the film. Their mother is played by Melissa Leo, another performance worthy of recognition come award season. Her desire to see her kids rise to fame blind her from the truth. She denies the drugs and the failures and believes she knows what's best for her kids. This means not letting them get a real chance because it would be with a real manager and she would be left behind. Family is important to her and she wants to keep everyone very close, even if it harms their chance at making a name for themselves. She of course, doesn't realize this. Amy Adams is the love interest, you know there had to be one. She manages to pull Micky away from the family that is dragging him down. They don't like her for it. She has her own inspirations too, yet the story isn't interested in them. The main focus of the film is with Micky's bumpy road to the championship fight. Since this is based on a true story, I can't really fault it for becoming a bit formulaic and predictable, yet it is. David O. Russell is notorious for getting angry and violent with his crew/cast. He was in a physical fight with George Clooney on the set of Three Kings and anyone can go on youtube and check out the melt down he and Lily Tomlin had on the set of I Heart Huckabees. Both films coincidentally star Mark Walhberg, so it seems he doesn't have a problem working with the combative director. I can't deny that the man has talent. I really love Three Kings and found I Heart Huckabees to be an ambitious project for the sheer weirdness of it all. With The Fighter, he plays to a more conventional audience. In terms of boxing films, it works. It plays on the down and out character, the poverty of his life and the sheer determination he has to make a name for himself. It's no Rocky, or as others have mentioned Raging Bull, but it is good enough to be mentioned with them. Russell always has an eye for a creative shot. Check out Three Kings colour scheme for what I mean. Here he uses TV cameras for the boxing matches. Interesting move, it feels like we are watching it at home and are not really in the ring with them. I admire directors who think outside of the box. Russell does this, no problem. He also decides to include real footage of the characters. The film has some home video segments throughout and during the credits we get to meet the real Micky Ward and Dicky Eckland, which is even more reason to appreciate Bale's performance. The film trips a bit because of the lack of emotion from Walhberg. I dig the guy and enjoy his films, but his range isn't there yet. When given a role that he can play the absurdity of, he scores. Watch The Departed for that. For a film where the audience needs to get behind a character, to root and cheer for them to overcome their obstacles, he falls a little short. Thank goodness the film makes up for this with the performances from Bale and Leo. The Fighter features great music, engaging performances and a predictable, yet true story. I felt attached to the characters and hoping they would make smart decisions. If a film can get me to care about the characters, I say bravo. The Fighter is a winner in my books.