Final Analysis Reviews

  • Aug 20, 2018

    i don't know why this second-best thriller of the 90's takes this place: excellent cast and acting, realistic plot.

    i don't know why this second-best thriller of the 90's takes this place: excellent cast and acting, realistic plot.

  • Dec 07, 2017

    Now for the most part they both stared in No Mercy which I have not seen but Final Analysis is the one I've seen. This is actually going to be like Vertigo which I didn't know but it gets old quickly. Richard Gere plays Issac Barr, a doctor psychiatrist who helps Heather's sister, Diana who is having nightmares in the past about frightening and horrific childhood memories about his father. Heather is married to Jimmy Evans who is a violent and wealthy Greek gangster and she's suffering from pathological intoxication. Now this is where I go from here. Final Analysis is an Alfred Hitchcockian unfocused neo-noir psychological thriller with unfocused performences, the courtroom scenes are kind of rushed and a dull story that rips off Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo. I actually don't mind myself analysing a flower shaped like a penis. Aside from that, it's not much. It has it's moments but the film itself is dull but it was all right.

    Now for the most part they both stared in No Mercy which I have not seen but Final Analysis is the one I've seen. This is actually going to be like Vertigo which I didn't know but it gets old quickly. Richard Gere plays Issac Barr, a doctor psychiatrist who helps Heather's sister, Diana who is having nightmares in the past about frightening and horrific childhood memories about his father. Heather is married to Jimmy Evans who is a violent and wealthy Greek gangster and she's suffering from pathological intoxication. Now this is where I go from here. Final Analysis is an Alfred Hitchcockian unfocused neo-noir psychological thriller with unfocused performences, the courtroom scenes are kind of rushed and a dull story that rips off Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo. I actually don't mind myself analysing a flower shaped like a penis. Aside from that, it's not much. It has it's moments but the film itself is dull but it was all right.

  • Mar 12, 2016

    Quite a silly film, tries hard to be clever.

    Quite a silly film, tries hard to be clever.

  • Jan 19, 2016

    After recently viewing such erotic thriller classics as "Basic Instinct" and "Wild Things," I've come to the conclusion that melodramatic, sexy psychological thrillers are perhaps my utmost guilty pleasure. I love how over-the-top they are, visually Hitchcockian and dramatically humungous, with a stealthy soundtrack symphonically heightening the untamed emotions of each scene. A couple of sex scenes peppered in and you've got a tale of suspense with multiple extra kicks, so trashy and so sordid that we'd like to call it high entertainment because the entertainment factor is so high. The mid-1990s were the genre's pinnacle, several trying to imitate the successes of "Fatal Attraction" and "Basic Instinct" most prominently. An early example comes in the shape of "Final Analysis," released just a month before the former. Neurotic and malicious, it has moments of insight, but eventually falls into the trap of over-plotting; it is too fond of the plot twist, forgetting that viewers like to gasp but not so much so that breathing becomes a difficulty. It commences with aptitude only to fly off the rails sometime after Plot Twist #1 is revealed - after that, it becomes an eye-roll of a film, passing itself off as more of a wannabe steamer than a worthy one. In "Final Analysis," Richard Gere plays Dr. Isaac Barr, a respected psychiatrist currently treating Diana Baylor (Uma Thurman), a young woman suffering from horrific recurring nightmares. It is a case not unlike many that he's already undergone, so things get much more interesting when he is introduced to Diana's sister, Heather Evans (Kim Basinger), a comely blonde trapped in a marriage to a self-loathing gangster (Eric Roberts). It takes Isaac and Heather only a few moments to pursue the considerable chemistry that rests between them, and, before long, a hot and heavy affair consumes their lives. But, unbeknownst to Isaac, Heather suffers from a disease known as "pathological intoxication," through which a mere sip of alcohol can cause the victim to go completely berserk (we experience it firsthand through one laughable scene in which Heather has a drop of red wine at a fancy restaurant and ends up having a screaming fit that ends in a tackle). So when her husband is found bludgeoned to death, she becomes the prime suspect. But will her instability keep her out of the slammer? I recall writing a review of Pedro Almodóvar's "Live Flesh" a while back where I discussed the succession of thrillers who try too hard to be sexy and thrilling and dramatic and stylish, but end up awkwardly attempting to combine all characteristics or unevenly spotlighting aspects of each. But I praised "Live Flesh" for doing it all with flashy subtlety - "Final Analysis," unfortunately, is the kind of film that falls under the aforementioned poor succession. It's more risible and self-serious than sensual and suspenseful, certainly under the impression that heavy doses of twists, of turns, equals a complex and smart thriller. But it doesn't feel like a slick game of oneupmanship on the part of its director, Phil Joanou; it feels like a weak Hitchcock tribute. Never are we convinced of what it has to provide, both stylistically (which is sometimes juicily noiry) and story wise. The leading actors, possessing star personas that would make their inclusion in any film something to behold, seem stranded in a movie dressed up with no place to go. Gere is on auto-pilot, hero 101, if you will, as the film's leading man - his character is thinly written, without much of a personality to make us root for him. Basinger assures us that she's a worthy leading lady early on, but her performance later descends into camp so campy that I'd go so far as to say that she, plain and simply, misfires (but try reading her lines, committing the actions of her character - how effective would you be?). Only Thurman and Roberts are worthy of our time, she a would-be victim with a lot of tricks up her sleeve, he hammy and noticeably masochistic. But "Final Analysis" is a misstep of a movie, a bad reflection of cinematic trends of the time without the heat and entertainment value of its better counterparts. With all the talent involved, it's hard to see what necessarily went wrong - and yet, it's easy, knowing that confidence can be a dangerous animal. A sure thing can't always be so sure.

    After recently viewing such erotic thriller classics as "Basic Instinct" and "Wild Things," I've come to the conclusion that melodramatic, sexy psychological thrillers are perhaps my utmost guilty pleasure. I love how over-the-top they are, visually Hitchcockian and dramatically humungous, with a stealthy soundtrack symphonically heightening the untamed emotions of each scene. A couple of sex scenes peppered in and you've got a tale of suspense with multiple extra kicks, so trashy and so sordid that we'd like to call it high entertainment because the entertainment factor is so high. The mid-1990s were the genre's pinnacle, several trying to imitate the successes of "Fatal Attraction" and "Basic Instinct" most prominently. An early example comes in the shape of "Final Analysis," released just a month before the former. Neurotic and malicious, it has moments of insight, but eventually falls into the trap of over-plotting; it is too fond of the plot twist, forgetting that viewers like to gasp but not so much so that breathing becomes a difficulty. It commences with aptitude only to fly off the rails sometime after Plot Twist #1 is revealed - after that, it becomes an eye-roll of a film, passing itself off as more of a wannabe steamer than a worthy one. In "Final Analysis," Richard Gere plays Dr. Isaac Barr, a respected psychiatrist currently treating Diana Baylor (Uma Thurman), a young woman suffering from horrific recurring nightmares. It is a case not unlike many that he's already undergone, so things get much more interesting when he is introduced to Diana's sister, Heather Evans (Kim Basinger), a comely blonde trapped in a marriage to a self-loathing gangster (Eric Roberts). It takes Isaac and Heather only a few moments to pursue the considerable chemistry that rests between them, and, before long, a hot and heavy affair consumes their lives. But, unbeknownst to Isaac, Heather suffers from a disease known as "pathological intoxication," through which a mere sip of alcohol can cause the victim to go completely berserk (we experience it firsthand through one laughable scene in which Heather has a drop of red wine at a fancy restaurant and ends up having a screaming fit that ends in a tackle). So when her husband is found bludgeoned to death, she becomes the prime suspect. But will her instability keep her out of the slammer? I recall writing a review of Pedro Almodóvar's "Live Flesh" a while back where I discussed the succession of thrillers who try too hard to be sexy and thrilling and dramatic and stylish, but end up awkwardly attempting to combine all characteristics or unevenly spotlighting aspects of each. But I praised "Live Flesh" for doing it all with flashy subtlety - "Final Analysis," unfortunately, is the kind of film that falls under the aforementioned poor succession. It's more risible and self-serious than sensual and suspenseful, certainly under the impression that heavy doses of twists, of turns, equals a complex and smart thriller. But it doesn't feel like a slick game of oneupmanship on the part of its director, Phil Joanou; it feels like a weak Hitchcock tribute. Never are we convinced of what it has to provide, both stylistically (which is sometimes juicily noiry) and story wise. The leading actors, possessing star personas that would make their inclusion in any film something to behold, seem stranded in a movie dressed up with no place to go. Gere is on auto-pilot, hero 101, if you will, as the film's leading man - his character is thinly written, without much of a personality to make us root for him. Basinger assures us that she's a worthy leading lady early on, but her performance later descends into camp so campy that I'd go so far as to say that she, plain and simply, misfires (but try reading her lines, committing the actions of her character - how effective would you be?). Only Thurman and Roberts are worthy of our time, she a would-be victim with a lot of tricks up her sleeve, he hammy and noticeably masochistic. But "Final Analysis" is a misstep of a movie, a bad reflection of cinematic trends of the time without the heat and entertainment value of its better counterparts. With all the talent involved, it's hard to see what necessarily went wrong - and yet, it's easy, knowing that confidence can be a dangerous animal. A sure thing can't always be so sure.

  • May 14, 2015

    This movie starts very slow, but ends up being a good movie. It throws a nice twist and a punch which makes it very interesting, great film with suspense and emotions. So for this being another great movies from the 90's and always had this type of movies, I give "Final Analysis" a C.

    This movie starts very slow, but ends up being a good movie. It throws a nice twist and a punch which makes it very interesting, great film with suspense and emotions. So for this being another great movies from the 90's and always had this type of movies, I give "Final Analysis" a C.

  • Apr 06, 2015

    These type movies were the rage of the times and this so called thriller is one of the worst.

    These type movies were the rage of the times and this so called thriller is one of the worst.

  • Dec 17, 2014

    A good Neo Noir movie in the tradition of Alfred Hitchcock

    A good Neo Noir movie in the tradition of Alfred Hitchcock

  • Mar 30, 2014

    Vieux ! Mais toujours excellent!

    Vieux ! Mais toujours excellent!

  • Nov 12, 2013

    The film looks and feels like a Hitchcock thriller, but the noir plot twists become predictable, unnecessarily convoluted, and sometimes maddening.

    The film looks and feels like a Hitchcock thriller, but the noir plot twists become predictable, unnecessarily convoluted, and sometimes maddening.

  • Oct 04, 2013

    (53%) A decent suspense drama with more than a element of Hitchcock about it. The first half hour drags a little but once it gets going it improves, but don't expect too much excitement here.

    (53%) A decent suspense drama with more than a element of Hitchcock about it. The first half hour drags a little but once it gets going it improves, but don't expect too much excitement here.