Find Me Guilty

2006

Find Me Guilty

Critics Consensus

Find Me Guilty's excessive length and heavy-handed narrative keep it from reaching its full potential, but Vin Diesel's performance is well worth watching.

62%

TOMATOMETER

Total Count: 104

62%

Audience Score

User Ratings: 58,885
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Movie Info

A wise guy turns his own trial upside down by serving as his own lawyer in this comedy drama based on a true story. In 1987, an extensive investigation into the activities of the Lucchese crime family led to charges being filed against most of the key members of the gang, leading to the prosecution of 20 different men, each represented by their own council. That is, except for Giacomo DiNorscio, aka Jackie Dee (Vin Diesel), a longtime Lucchese family "mechanic" implicated in everything from kidnapping to drug dealing. While Jackie Dee is obviously a common criminal and guilty of all he's charged with, he also has a fierce sense of loyalty to his colleagues, despite the fact his cousin Tony Companga (Raul Esparza) previously tried to kill him out of fear he might talk. Sean Kierney (Linus Roache), the prosecutor tackling the Lucchese Family case, tries repeatedly to persuade Jackie Dee to testify against his partners in exchange for leniency, but he stubbornly refuses. Tired of the way things are being handled, Jackie Dee informs family attorney Ben Klandis (Peter Dinklage) that he intends to represent himself in court; this seemingly suicidal move turns into an unexpected success as Jackie Dee's sense of humor and streetwise charm has a remarkable impact on the judge and jury. Find Me Guilty also stars Ron Silver, Alex Rocco, and Annabella Sciorra. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

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Cast

Vin Diesel
as Giacomo `Jackie Dee' DiNorscio
Peter Dinklage
as Ben Klandis
Linus Roache
as Sean Kierney
Ron Silver
as Judge Finestein
Alex Rocco
as Nick Calabrese
Annabella Sciorra
as Bella DiNorscio
Raul Esparza
as Tony Compagna
Richard Portnow
as Max Novardis
Domenick Lombardozzi
as Jerry McQueen
Robert Stanton
as Chris Newberger
Marcia Jean Kurtz
as Sara Stiles
Josh Pais
as Bellman
Dennis Albanese
as Court Officer
David Brown
as U.S. Marshal
Michalina Almindo
as Gino's Girlfriend
James Biberi
as Frank Brentano
Paul Borghese
as Gino Mascarpone
Tim Cinnante
as Joey Calabrese
Jeff Chena
as Defendant 13
Marcus Allen Cooper
as Klandis' Special Assistant
Antoni Corone
as Detective
Richard DeDomenico
as Tom `Nappy' Napoli
Mario D'Elia
as DEA Agent
Jerry Grayson
as Jimmy Katz
Cassandra Hepburn
as Klandis' Secretary
Lou Irizarry
as Mob Defendant
Nicole LaPera
as Tim's Wife
Charles LaPlaca
as Mob Lawyer
Ben Lipitz
as Henry Kelsey
Eddie Marrero
as Prison Guard No. 1
Rose Pasquale
as Roselyn Mascarpone
Frank Pietrangolare
as Carlo Mascarpone
Joe Rosario
as Mob Lawyer
Gene Ruffini
as DeNorsico Senior
Derrick Simmons
as Prison Guard No. 2
Troy Smith
as Prison Inmate
Vito Violante
as Mob Lawyer
Roger Zamudio
as Octavio Juarez
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Critic Reviews for Find Me Guilty

All Critics (104) | Top Critics (37)

Audience Reviews for Find Me Guilty

  • Sep 11, 2014
    "You'll be the only person who was disbarred, without being a lawyer in the first place." Sydney Lumet is a brilliant director, probably known best for his classic courtroom dramas like 12 Angry Men and The Verdict. To see him direct a totally different take on the sub-genre caught me a little off guard and ended up being a very pleasant surprise. Find Me Guilty is funny. Vin Diesel leads the charge in this dark comedy that's based on a true story. I can confidently say that this is his best work. He's a scumbag, but he oozes charm. Despite being based on a true story, the story leaves a lot to be desired. It's a fairly shallow affair, but it is never boring. I recommend the film for Diesel's performance at least, if nothing else.
    Ryan R Super Reviewer
  • Oct 23, 2009
    Vin Diesel was GREAT in this movie
    Brody M Super Reviewer
  • Aug 25, 2009
    An original, watchable movie with shades of "My Cousin Vinny" appearing here and there, making this an entertaining two hours, anchored in large part due to the strong, realistic performance by Vin Diesel. For all of Diesel's critics, watch this movie, this film proves that this guy can act, as well as carry a film. Peter Dinklage is an excellent choice for the role of the lawyer as well, I really think that if he were of normal size, he'd be a very coveted actor. What's cool about this movie is that you don't know how it'll end, it's hard to tell if it's going to go the happy or depressing route.
    Dan S Super Reviewer
  • Nov 20, 2008
    <i>"Sometimes the best defense. . . is a wiseguy."</i> A wise guy turns his own trial upside down by serving as his own lawyer in this comedy drama based on a true story. In 1987, an extensive investigation into the activities of the Lucchese crime family led to charges being filed against most of the key members of the gang, leading to the prosecution of 20 different men, each represented by their own council. That is, except for Giacomo DiNorscio, aka Jackie Dee (Vin Diesel), a longtime Lucchese family "mechanic" implicated in everything from kidnapping to drug dealing. While Jackie Dee is obviously a common criminal and guilty of all he's charged with, he also has a fierce sense of loyalty to his colleagues, despite the fact his cousin Tony Companga (Raul Esparza) previously tried to kill him out of fear he might talk. Sean Kierney (Linus Roache), the prosecutor tackling the Lucchese Family case, tries repeatedly to persuade Jackie Dee to testify against his partners in exchange for leniency, but he stubbornly refuses. Tired of the way things are being handled, Jackie Dee informs family attorney Ben Klandis (Peter Dinklage) that he intends to represent himself in court; this seemingly suicidal move turns into an unexpected success as Jackie Dee's sense of humor and streetwise charm has a remarkable impact on the judge and jury. <b><u>Review</u></b> I found Diesel's act quite moving. He captured the essence of the character and its complexity. Sidney Lumet's earlier film Dog Day Afternoon deals with the same issue of protagonists who defy police authority and the law, while the crowd (here the jury) sympathies with them instead of the prosecutors, the police and the law. By this, we get a strong post-modern statement by Lumet. Can we judge criminals? Is there a single truth? Lumet claims that there are several. I tend to disagree, but the fact is, that is an aspect of human nature in which we would like to defy law and order, to break the foundation of our society and to set our minds free.
    Lorenzo v Super Reviewer

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