Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell Reviews

  • Oct 10, 2017

    Better than its reputation. This is a very worthy ending for Cushing’s run as the Baron. The gore factor is kicked up for this one considerably. The Monster is menacing and pitiable all at once, while Frankenstein is as morally bankrupt as ever.

    Better than its reputation. This is a very worthy ending for Cushing’s run as the Baron. The gore factor is kicked up for this one considerably. The Monster is menacing and pitiable all at once, while Frankenstein is as morally bankrupt as ever.

  • Jul 03, 2016

    Upon being imprisoned for bodysnatching and sorcery, a young surgeon learns that his esteemed mentor, the great Victor Frankenstein, is alive and well, and has been practicing his dark arts from within the prison walls as Dr. Carl Victor. Together, the pair manage to successfully transplant the brilliant mind of a scholar into the body of a murderous brute, but the body of the beast begins to take over its mind as it strikes off on a bloody rampage! Peter Cushing returns to the role of Baron Frankenstein in Hammer's sixth and final entry into the famed Horror series. Here, the character has taken a surprisingly modest turn that lacks the snide sense of superiority that defined Cushing's earlier performances. Cushing is in fine form, as always, and makes a grand entrance as he comes to the aid of young Simon. The plot, at this point, is quite derivative of the earlier films, but that makes it no less entertaining. Despite the shabbiness of the costume and an immovable facial apparatus, David Prowse manages to act through the make-up with his emotive gesturing and body language. FRANKENSTEIN AND THE MONSTER FROM HELL does bear the mark of Hammer's later films unfortunately, which attempted to exploit sex and gore in order to appeal to the changing tastes of the time. This film features the most graphic scenes in the series as a result, including a particularly nasty brain transplant and several bloody murders. As his last Horror film, however, Terence Fisher still retains many of the traditional Gothic trappings that gave him such success throughout the years. A lesser accomplishment in the series, to be sure, FRANKENSTEIN AND THE MONSTER FROM HELL is still a worthwhile entry for any fan of Gothic Horror.

    Upon being imprisoned for bodysnatching and sorcery, a young surgeon learns that his esteemed mentor, the great Victor Frankenstein, is alive and well, and has been practicing his dark arts from within the prison walls as Dr. Carl Victor. Together, the pair manage to successfully transplant the brilliant mind of a scholar into the body of a murderous brute, but the body of the beast begins to take over its mind as it strikes off on a bloody rampage! Peter Cushing returns to the role of Baron Frankenstein in Hammer's sixth and final entry into the famed Horror series. Here, the character has taken a surprisingly modest turn that lacks the snide sense of superiority that defined Cushing's earlier performances. Cushing is in fine form, as always, and makes a grand entrance as he comes to the aid of young Simon. The plot, at this point, is quite derivative of the earlier films, but that makes it no less entertaining. Despite the shabbiness of the costume and an immovable facial apparatus, David Prowse manages to act through the make-up with his emotive gesturing and body language. FRANKENSTEIN AND THE MONSTER FROM HELL does bear the mark of Hammer's later films unfortunately, which attempted to exploit sex and gore in order to appeal to the changing tastes of the time. This film features the most graphic scenes in the series as a result, including a particularly nasty brain transplant and several bloody murders. As his last Horror film, however, Terence Fisher still retains many of the traditional Gothic trappings that gave him such success throughout the years. A lesser accomplishment in the series, to be sure, FRANKENSTEIN AND THE MONSTER FROM HELL is still a worthwhile entry for any fan of Gothic Horror.

  • Jul 03, 2016

    The series comes full circle with Frankenstein and the Monster From Hell and Cushing's swansong performance as the single-minded and amoral baron and doctor. Perhaps taken inspiration from the events of the last film, Frankenstein is working as the doctor in residence at an asylum for the criminally insane. Having faked his death (again) he is operating as Doctor Karl Victor perfecting his work on a neolithic man(!), once again returning an actual monster to the series. The addition of the Simon character to the cast allows Cushing to deliver a performance that echoes his original in Curse as both characters are as in sync as Victor and Paul were in the original film, only this time with the roles reversed. With the mute Sarah added to the cast, the film sports a bizarre 'family' that again mirrors the first film's cast. Frankenstein even has an opportunity to laugh, the first time in the series since the first film. The production value is excellent and being one of the later Hammer films, does benefit from not looking like its rehashing the old Bray Studio sets that one can point out so easily in early Hammer films. The monster on the other hand does disappoint, looking a bit like they overreached what they thought they could accomplish. In fact none of the films ever matched Curse with the make-up job they had on Christopher Lee and it stands as the only critical deficiency of these films. Ironically this last film is the only one to end without a cliffhanger but ends on a strange casual note, with a promise of starting again. Of course this was not to be. This ending does lend the film a haunting finality to Cushing's Frankenstein; forever defeated in his scientific ambition but always ready to begin again. Its somehow comforting that the last we see of him is not trapped in flames or on his way to the guillotine, but sweeping the floors of his lab, planning some mad new scheme. Worth noting is Patrick Troughton, The 2nd Doctor himself appearing in the film's opening. Sadly he shares no scenes with Cushing, thus far the only big-screen Doctor to date. Also the original 'M', Bernard Lee in one of his last roles; its odd to see him playing such a bit part so late in his career.

    The series comes full circle with Frankenstein and the Monster From Hell and Cushing's swansong performance as the single-minded and amoral baron and doctor. Perhaps taken inspiration from the events of the last film, Frankenstein is working as the doctor in residence at an asylum for the criminally insane. Having faked his death (again) he is operating as Doctor Karl Victor perfecting his work on a neolithic man(!), once again returning an actual monster to the series. The addition of the Simon character to the cast allows Cushing to deliver a performance that echoes his original in Curse as both characters are as in sync as Victor and Paul were in the original film, only this time with the roles reversed. With the mute Sarah added to the cast, the film sports a bizarre 'family' that again mirrors the first film's cast. Frankenstein even has an opportunity to laugh, the first time in the series since the first film. The production value is excellent and being one of the later Hammer films, does benefit from not looking like its rehashing the old Bray Studio sets that one can point out so easily in early Hammer films. The monster on the other hand does disappoint, looking a bit like they overreached what they thought they could accomplish. In fact none of the films ever matched Curse with the make-up job they had on Christopher Lee and it stands as the only critical deficiency of these films. Ironically this last film is the only one to end without a cliffhanger but ends on a strange casual note, with a promise of starting again. Of course this was not to be. This ending does lend the film a haunting finality to Cushing's Frankenstein; forever defeated in his scientific ambition but always ready to begin again. Its somehow comforting that the last we see of him is not trapped in flames or on his way to the guillotine, but sweeping the floors of his lab, planning some mad new scheme. Worth noting is Patrick Troughton, The 2nd Doctor himself appearing in the film's opening. Sadly he shares no scenes with Cushing, thus far the only big-screen Doctor to date. Also the original 'M', Bernard Lee in one of his last roles; its odd to see him playing such a bit part so late in his career.

  • Jul 03, 2016

    Probably more famous for the edited scene!

    Probably more famous for the edited scene!

  • Jul 03, 2016

    Le dernier effort de Terence Fisher à la Hammer, en fait l’un des tout derniers films de la fameuse maison de production avant qu’elle ne ferme ses portes, est un film qui laisse mi-figue mi-raisin. Ce n’est pas un film énergique et délicieusement « evil » comme l’ont été des chef-d’œuvre tels que Horror of Dracula ou Frankenstein must be destroy (tout deux signés Fisher). À l’époque (en 1958 dans le cas de Dracula), Fisher, avec la Hammer, créait ni plus ni moins ce qui allait devenir le vocabulaire cinématographique de l’horreur moderne (et qui a encore sa pertinence 40 ans plus tard). En 1973, à première vue, Fisher semble essouflé. Et pourtant… s’il y a très peu d’action dans cet opus, il y a un je ne sais quoi qui maintient l’intérêt du spectateur (ce qui, rendu au sixième film d’une franchise, n’est pas une mince affaire!), comme si, malgré tout, la maison de production avait encore quelques cartes dans sa manche. Car pour l’amateur d’horreur grotesque et lugubre, il y a plusieurs choses à considérer pour son plaisir (et oui : nous prenons plaisir aux choses les plus étranges qui soient!). D’abord le lieu principal de l’action, un asile psychiatrique où le célèbre baron a réussi à s’infiltrer en jouant de sa proverbiale intelligence manipulatrice. Ces éléments du scénario plante le film dans un univers d’une morbidité exécrable qui, à elle seule, devrait faire saliver l’amateur du genre. Mais il y a plus. Peter Cushing est toujours aussi exceptionnel (le rôle lui appartient à tout jamais par rapport à tous les autres barons!) et il apporte, 6 films plus tard, quelques nuances supplémentaires à un rôle qu’il campe depuis 1957. Sa prestation vaut largement le détour. Il est entouré, pour notre plus grand bonheur, de personnages intéressants, à la rigueur suffisamment intrigants, faisant de ce petit film un des plus fascinants à ce niveau de la Hammer (le jeune acolyte de Frankenstein, le Dr Simon Heller, est un personnage tout à fait savoureux, le directeur de l’asile qui pourrait être son propre client, une jeune fille muette qui est toujours près du baron, et j’en passe). La qualité des décors est, quant à elle, toujours sublime (les décors ont toujours été un des points forts de la Hammer). Frankenstein and the monster from hell présente la créature la plus affreuse de la série. Jouée par David « Darth Vader » Prowse, elle éveille autant le dégoût (plusieurs scènes, malgré le côté daté des maquillages et effets spéciaux, ont encore un effet répulsif) que la sympathie, tant son destin (et ses origines!) est tragique. Il faut souligner l’apport constant de scénaristes de talent dans cette série qui ont su apporter, à chaque film, des éléments nouveaux dans le célèbre mythe populaire de Mary Shelley. Bref, la principale faiblesse de ce film par rapport aux autres films de la série (et surtout au précédent, le délicieux Frankenstein must be destroy) c’est son manque d’action, sa lenteur d’exécution… Cependant, l’ensemble des personnages, l’intrigue du récit et le talent de tout le monde à l’œuvre, tout ces éléments viennent clore, sur une note justement macabre et bien exécutée, une des séries les plus efficaces que nous a livré le monde de l’Épouvante cinématographique (à défaut d’être la plus réussie au niveau artistique!).

    Le dernier effort de Terence Fisher à la Hammer, en fait l’un des tout derniers films de la fameuse maison de production avant qu’elle ne ferme ses portes, est un film qui laisse mi-figue mi-raisin. Ce n’est pas un film énergique et délicieusement « evil » comme l’ont été des chef-d’œuvre tels que Horror of Dracula ou Frankenstein must be destroy (tout deux signés Fisher). À l’époque (en 1958 dans le cas de Dracula), Fisher, avec la Hammer, créait ni plus ni moins ce qui allait devenir le vocabulaire cinématographique de l’horreur moderne (et qui a encore sa pertinence 40 ans plus tard). En 1973, à première vue, Fisher semble essouflé. Et pourtant… s’il y a très peu d’action dans cet opus, il y a un je ne sais quoi qui maintient l’intérêt du spectateur (ce qui, rendu au sixième film d’une franchise, n’est pas une mince affaire!), comme si, malgré tout, la maison de production avait encore quelques cartes dans sa manche. Car pour l’amateur d’horreur grotesque et lugubre, il y a plusieurs choses à considérer pour son plaisir (et oui : nous prenons plaisir aux choses les plus étranges qui soient!). D’abord le lieu principal de l’action, un asile psychiatrique où le célèbre baron a réussi à s’infiltrer en jouant de sa proverbiale intelligence manipulatrice. Ces éléments du scénario plante le film dans un univers d’une morbidité exécrable qui, à elle seule, devrait faire saliver l’amateur du genre. Mais il y a plus. Peter Cushing est toujours aussi exceptionnel (le rôle lui appartient à tout jamais par rapport à tous les autres barons!) et il apporte, 6 films plus tard, quelques nuances supplémentaires à un rôle qu’il campe depuis 1957. Sa prestation vaut largement le détour. Il est entouré, pour notre plus grand bonheur, de personnages intéressants, à la rigueur suffisamment intrigants, faisant de ce petit film un des plus fascinants à ce niveau de la Hammer (le jeune acolyte de Frankenstein, le Dr Simon Heller, est un personnage tout à fait savoureux, le directeur de l’asile qui pourrait être son propre client, une jeune fille muette qui est toujours près du baron, et j’en passe). La qualité des décors est, quant à elle, toujours sublime (les décors ont toujours été un des points forts de la Hammer). Frankenstein and the monster from hell présente la créature la plus affreuse de la série. Jouée par David « Darth Vader » Prowse, elle éveille autant le dégoût (plusieurs scènes, malgré le côté daté des maquillages et effets spéciaux, ont encore un effet répulsif) que la sympathie, tant son destin (et ses origines!) est tragique. Il faut souligner l’apport constant de scénaristes de talent dans cette série qui ont su apporter, à chaque film, des éléments nouveaux dans le célèbre mythe populaire de Mary Shelley. Bref, la principale faiblesse de ce film par rapport aux autres films de la série (et surtout au précédent, le délicieux Frankenstein must be destroy) c’est son manque d’action, sa lenteur d’exécution… Cependant, l’ensemble des personnages, l’intrigue du récit et le talent de tout le monde à l’œuvre, tout ces éléments viennent clore, sur une note justement macabre et bien exécutée, une des séries les plus efficaces que nous a livré le monde de l’Épouvante cinématographique (à défaut d’être la plus réussie au niveau artistique!).

  • Jul 03, 2016

    In their last few years, Hammer produced some of their greatest works and this is a wonderful coda to their Frankenstein series, an intelligent, inventive, stylized reworking of the themes that had sustained the series for almost two decades . The film however belongs to Cushing and is a perfect swansong for his greatest creation.

    In their last few years, Hammer produced some of their greatest works and this is a wonderful coda to their Frankenstein series, an intelligent, inventive, stylized reworking of the themes that had sustained the series for almost two decades . The film however belongs to Cushing and is a perfect swansong for his greatest creation.

  • Jul 03, 2016

    6th in the series and an improvement on the last installment,Dave Prowse plays a good sympathetic monster and Cushing in his last appearance as baron frankenstein gives the performance his all,Funny in places too

    6th in the series and an improvement on the last installment,Dave Prowse plays a good sympathetic monster and Cushing in his last appearance as baron frankenstein gives the performance his all,Funny in places too

  • Jul 03, 2016

    Underrated late Hammer film, one of the best of the Frankenstein cycle.

    Underrated late Hammer film, one of the best of the Frankenstein cycle.

  • Jul 03, 2016

    The denizens of the asylum might well have crawled from the pages of Goya's Caprichos.

    The denizens of the asylum might well have crawled from the pages of Goya's Caprichos.

  • Jul 03, 2016

    Enjoyable final Cushing Frankenstein film from hammer Studios. Set in an insanse asylum, Dr. Frankenstein of course resumes work upon building a new human from pieces. A worthy final entry in the series.

    Enjoyable final Cushing Frankenstein film from hammer Studios. Set in an insanse asylum, Dr. Frankenstein of course resumes work upon building a new human from pieces. A worthy final entry in the series.