Reviews

  • Sep 27, 2020

    A decent doc that isn't exactly career spanning, but still covers the basics. Ozzy put out a doc in 1992 called Don't Blame Me that was made during the No More Tears era and it's by far the better documentary. Seek that one out if you can.

    A decent doc that isn't exactly career spanning, but still covers the basics. Ozzy put out a doc in 1992 called Don't Blame Me that was made during the No More Tears era and it's by far the better documentary. Seek that one out if you can.

  • Feb 11, 2015

    A totally ok dokumentary of Ozzy's life, a little tame compared to the book but.. worth seeing... especially if you haven't read the book.

    A totally ok dokumentary of Ozzy's life, a little tame compared to the book but.. worth seeing... especially if you haven't read the book.

  • Nov 12, 2014

    Ozzy's life has been VERY well publicized, but never like this. This doc kind of shocked me as to the detail they went into in the Ozzman's life. Nothing's held back, his kids are all very candid on their feelings. And for someone who's been living on borrowed time for possibly the last 35yrs, Ozzy still works his ass off to be everything he can be to his fans. I love Ozzy, always have, and always will, but beware, this isn't the light funny "Osbournes", this is very real.

    Ozzy's life has been VERY well publicized, but never like this. This doc kind of shocked me as to the detail they went into in the Ozzman's life. Nothing's held back, his kids are all very candid on their feelings. And for someone who's been living on borrowed time for possibly the last 35yrs, Ozzy still works his ass off to be everything he can be to his fans. I love Ozzy, always have, and always will, but beware, this isn't the light funny "Osbournes", this is very real.

  • Nov 06, 2014

    Very interesting watching this an learning facts you didn't now about Ozzy...

    Very interesting watching this an learning facts you didn't now about Ozzy...

  • Jun 24, 2014

    A solid rockumentary but redundant for those who have red Ozzy's autobiography.

    A solid rockumentary but redundant for those who have red Ozzy's autobiography.

  • Mar 09, 2013

    good insight into a real character in music worth a watch if your into music.

    good insight into a real character in music worth a watch if your into music.

  • paul s Super Reviewer
    Feb 04, 2013

    I'm sure that out there somewhere there is a rock documentary that strays from the formula - but God Bless Ozzie is not that film - not that it doesn't manage to entertain and inform (which is, I would suppose, the goal of the enterprise). The formula, in case you are new to this 3rd planet in our solar system, is to show the person/band now, and then rewind back to childhood and then to the glory days that make us want to find out about the person/band in the first place. One of the failings in this film is that it shows the childhood pics by having Ozzie flip through them all and comment - a questionable tactic as his train of thought is still a bit scattered after 40 years of substance abuse. There are no real insights here - those come later, and mostly from his 2nd wife Sharon, who reveals that Oz has always had deep seated insecurities. Where the film shines is in showing that very bright light that was early Black Sabbath - as the many testimonials attest, Sabbath pretty much invented heavy metal - and musical luminaries such as Sir Paul noted that they were original, and looking back, quite talented and excellent song writers. The film then slogs through the post Sabbath, Randy Rhodes years as Oz self destructs - it is to the film's credit (or perhaps simply watching the act of redemption) that the slow catharsis and healing of OZ has some poignancy. At the end, when he speaks of finally accepting and coming to terms with himself, it rings true and resonates (something as simple as when, at age 60, he finally gets a drivers license - something most would take for granted - but here it signifies a return to the real world - and Ozzie has come full circle to embody that 3rd Sabbath album title "Masters of Reality").

    I'm sure that out there somewhere there is a rock documentary that strays from the formula - but God Bless Ozzie is not that film - not that it doesn't manage to entertain and inform (which is, I would suppose, the goal of the enterprise). The formula, in case you are new to this 3rd planet in our solar system, is to show the person/band now, and then rewind back to childhood and then to the glory days that make us want to find out about the person/band in the first place. One of the failings in this film is that it shows the childhood pics by having Ozzie flip through them all and comment - a questionable tactic as his train of thought is still a bit scattered after 40 years of substance abuse. There are no real insights here - those come later, and mostly from his 2nd wife Sharon, who reveals that Oz has always had deep seated insecurities. Where the film shines is in showing that very bright light that was early Black Sabbath - as the many testimonials attest, Sabbath pretty much invented heavy metal - and musical luminaries such as Sir Paul noted that they were original, and looking back, quite talented and excellent song writers. The film then slogs through the post Sabbath, Randy Rhodes years as Oz self destructs - it is to the film's credit (or perhaps simply watching the act of redemption) that the slow catharsis and healing of OZ has some poignancy. At the end, when he speaks of finally accepting and coming to terms with himself, it rings true and resonates (something as simple as when, at age 60, he finally gets a drivers license - something most would take for granted - but here it signifies a return to the real world - and Ozzie has come full circle to embody that 3rd Sabbath album title "Masters of Reality").

  • Jan 06, 2013

    Sheds a lot of light on a musician that I think is too often recognized for his unique character than his music. Great watch for lovers of ROCK-DOCs.

    Sheds a lot of light on a musician that I think is too often recognized for his unique character than his music. Great watch for lovers of ROCK-DOCs.

  • Jan 04, 2013

    1/4/2012: Pretty good documentary.

    1/4/2012: Pretty good documentary.

  • Dec 20, 2012

    The warts and all rockumentary about the legendary metal singer that reveals some sad truths about Ozzy, that for much of his career, far from being a powerful rock figure, he's been rather a pathetic, drug and alcohol-addicted individual. It's great that he finally appears to be over his addictions. My biggest personal disappointment of this doco was that no mention at all was given to Ozzy's gun guitarist Jake E. Lee, who took the place of Randy Rhoads.

    The warts and all rockumentary about the legendary metal singer that reveals some sad truths about Ozzy, that for much of his career, far from being a powerful rock figure, he's been rather a pathetic, drug and alcohol-addicted individual. It's great that he finally appears to be over his addictions. My biggest personal disappointment of this doco was that no mention at all was given to Ozzy's gun guitarist Jake E. Lee, who took the place of Randy Rhoads.