Godzilla 1985 Reviews

  • Jan 12, 2019

    A hungry Godzilla is peppered with a super X weapon and tricked by underhanded humans.

    A hungry Godzilla is peppered with a super X weapon and tricked by underhanded humans.

  • Dec 31, 2018

    Actually pretty good though I would only recommend it to hardcore Godzilla fans like myself

    Actually pretty good though I would only recommend it to hardcore Godzilla fans like myself

  • Oct 17, 2018

    this movie needs more love why fucking people think this is bad like goddzilla 98

    this movie needs more love why fucking people think this is bad like goddzilla 98

  • Sep 10, 2018

    *This review is intended for the original Japanese version, NOT THE AMERICAN ONE* This first reboot of the Godzilla franchise might not come across as fresh or breathtaking as the first incarnation of the monster (even though it's a continuation of the original film), but thanks to a politically driven plot; "The Return of Godzilla" proves that this monster can still deliver mindless, carnage fun... Even with the suit looking more fake and outdated as ever.

    *This review is intended for the original Japanese version, NOT THE AMERICAN ONE* This first reboot of the Godzilla franchise might not come across as fresh or breathtaking as the first incarnation of the monster (even though it's a continuation of the original film), but thanks to a politically driven plot; "The Return of Godzilla" proves that this monster can still deliver mindless, carnage fun... Even with the suit looking more fake and outdated as ever.

  • Mar 31, 2018

    This is a great Godzilla film that is super underrated in my opinion. Going to the dark roots of the series it's not the best Godzilla film but its up there.

    This is a great Godzilla film that is super underrated in my opinion. Going to the dark roots of the series it's not the best Godzilla film but its up there.

  • Feb 02, 2018

    I cannot find the Japanese version titled "Return of Godzilla" so I have to review the English version. I also had this film on VHS with Raymond Burr reprising his US only role from King of the Monsters. Most people don't realize this film essentially rebooted the series to become the direct sequel to the original film. Tonally the movie matches the original film as Godzilla is a force of nature and enemy whom humanity desperately fights against. The movie is somewhat period however as the movie features the US and USSR as major powers having to respond to the threat of Godzilla and the use of nukes more tenuous (look it up). Raymond Burr's role in the US version is neat but he doesn't do anything major unlike the Japanese cast. What i do like is that this film is not militaristic and kind of anti war, esentially viewing fighting and defeating Godzilla as just trying to save people and not "War guns soldiers Patriotism F-YEAH!". It's clever people who band together that save the world from Godzilla not military might. There's no other kaiju which leaves the focus on Godzilla and expands on the ending of the first film which was fear of nuclear weapons and the beasts that could arise from them.

    I cannot find the Japanese version titled "Return of Godzilla" so I have to review the English version. I also had this film on VHS with Raymond Burr reprising his US only role from King of the Monsters. Most people don't realize this film essentially rebooted the series to become the direct sequel to the original film. Tonally the movie matches the original film as Godzilla is a force of nature and enemy whom humanity desperately fights against. The movie is somewhat period however as the movie features the US and USSR as major powers having to respond to the threat of Godzilla and the use of nukes more tenuous (look it up). Raymond Burr's role in the US version is neat but he doesn't do anything major unlike the Japanese cast. What i do like is that this film is not militaristic and kind of anti war, esentially viewing fighting and defeating Godzilla as just trying to save people and not "War guns soldiers Patriotism F-YEAH!". It's clever people who band together that save the world from Godzilla not military might. There's no other kaiju which leaves the focus on Godzilla and expands on the ending of the first film which was fear of nuclear weapons and the beasts that could arise from them.

  • Jan 27, 2017

    Rating for the original uncut Japanese version.

    Rating for the original uncut Japanese version.

  • Nov 20, 2016

    This was a mixed bag for me. There wasn't that much middle ground for me on this viewing - on the one hand, this has some of (not, not some of, simply) the best use of a Godzilla as far as a man in a suit, not to mention with the practical effects, the use of miniatures (for instance the special flying machine that they use to especially zap Godzilla as opposed to the usual nuclear bombs, but we'll get to that in a moment), and the sets. It's sophisticated for the time even if at certain moments it may seem dated. It is, but that didn't stop me being riveted during every moment Godzilla was on screen, whether it was stomping all over a nuclear facility or, of course, all over Tokyo, and this latter part takes up much of the 2nd half of the movie (or at least the last half hour or more). The money, however much they spent, is up there on the screen. Even the film stock works to make it terrifying at times. On the other hand though, this is a return not just to Godzilla as a legitimate threat after something like 20 years as a "bad guy" (the last time he wasn't doing something 'heroic' in some way, whether it was battling other, worse monsters, or hanging out with his son or fighting aliens or some shit, was Mothra vs Godzilla), and the tone is meant to be going back to what was done at the start in Honda's Gojira and to an extent it's first sequel, Godzilla Raids Again. The problem here though is that the filmmakers focus on two storylines with the humans: one is relatively compelling and emotional, with a character who first discovers some men on a boat who have been killed by some unknown entity (and he also does battle with, uh, monster sea lice, yeah, it's weird), and then is questioned by scientists and officials about what he's seen and it's confirmed it is Godzilla, and then the guy's sister comes into the picture. But the other storyline involves the government itself and... dull is too nice a word. I don't know how it will be for others in the audience - and again, this is the original Japanese version I'm talking about, I haven't seen the American re-edit, which features Raymond Burr to connect it to the original American re-edit of the 54 film, and was panned by a lot of critics including sci-fi geek Roger Ebert - but there's a stretch of this movie I checked out of. I understood what the prime minister was dealing with was meant to be dramatic, but the conflict here, which involves the Soviets and to an extent the US and using nuclear weapons (including a missile from outer space) is more dated than any Godzilla costume or tiny airplane or set of cars. At the time the threat of nuclear annihiliation was in the air, but even then it was sort of in its last gasp of air, and seeing the prime minister have to mediate between Russians and Americans is acted so poorly and written so stiffly that it occurs to me even more how necessary the satire on bureaucracy in Shin Godzilla is (which, like this movie, features little title cards showing who certain people are, though the new one goes even more nuts for it). I think if you watch this only for the Godzilla action, it is incredible. It's shot in a way that is intentionally menacing - low angle shots of Godzilla return, how long had it been by then! - and the suit looks really sharp for its time, and the explosions and lighting are a great homage to the style that Honda originated with Toho's special effects people in 1954. If only the rest of the ho-hum movie (and yes the actors playing the 'ordinary' non-military/government people are quite good, though stock), with its barebones story and War-Games style theatrics around nuclear launch codes and outdated synth score (yes, synth can be dated folks), it could be one of the greats in the series.

    This was a mixed bag for me. There wasn't that much middle ground for me on this viewing - on the one hand, this has some of (not, not some of, simply) the best use of a Godzilla as far as a man in a suit, not to mention with the practical effects, the use of miniatures (for instance the special flying machine that they use to especially zap Godzilla as opposed to the usual nuclear bombs, but we'll get to that in a moment), and the sets. It's sophisticated for the time even if at certain moments it may seem dated. It is, but that didn't stop me being riveted during every moment Godzilla was on screen, whether it was stomping all over a nuclear facility or, of course, all over Tokyo, and this latter part takes up much of the 2nd half of the movie (or at least the last half hour or more). The money, however much they spent, is up there on the screen. Even the film stock works to make it terrifying at times. On the other hand though, this is a return not just to Godzilla as a legitimate threat after something like 20 years as a "bad guy" (the last time he wasn't doing something 'heroic' in some way, whether it was battling other, worse monsters, or hanging out with his son or fighting aliens or some shit, was Mothra vs Godzilla), and the tone is meant to be going back to what was done at the start in Honda's Gojira and to an extent it's first sequel, Godzilla Raids Again. The problem here though is that the filmmakers focus on two storylines with the humans: one is relatively compelling and emotional, with a character who first discovers some men on a boat who have been killed by some unknown entity (and he also does battle with, uh, monster sea lice, yeah, it's weird), and then is questioned by scientists and officials about what he's seen and it's confirmed it is Godzilla, and then the guy's sister comes into the picture. But the other storyline involves the government itself and... dull is too nice a word. I don't know how it will be for others in the audience - and again, this is the original Japanese version I'm talking about, I haven't seen the American re-edit, which features Raymond Burr to connect it to the original American re-edit of the 54 film, and was panned by a lot of critics including sci-fi geek Roger Ebert - but there's a stretch of this movie I checked out of. I understood what the prime minister was dealing with was meant to be dramatic, but the conflict here, which involves the Soviets and to an extent the US and using nuclear weapons (including a missile from outer space) is more dated than any Godzilla costume or tiny airplane or set of cars. At the time the threat of nuclear annihiliation was in the air, but even then it was sort of in its last gasp of air, and seeing the prime minister have to mediate between Russians and Americans is acted so poorly and written so stiffly that it occurs to me even more how necessary the satire on bureaucracy in Shin Godzilla is (which, like this movie, features little title cards showing who certain people are, though the new one goes even more nuts for it). I think if you watch this only for the Godzilla action, it is incredible. It's shot in a way that is intentionally menacing - low angle shots of Godzilla return, how long had it been by then! - and the suit looks really sharp for its time, and the explosions and lighting are a great homage to the style that Honda originated with Toho's special effects people in 1954. If only the rest of the ho-hum movie (and yes the actors playing the 'ordinary' non-military/government people are quite good, though stock), with its barebones story and War-Games style theatrics around nuclear launch codes and outdated synth score (yes, synth can be dated folks), it could be one of the greats in the series.

  • Sep 17, 2016

    The original Return of Godzilla (Not the American recut) is a dark, moody, and gritty monster movie. With its Cold War politics backdrop the movie feels more like a proper sequel to the 1954 original than any of the followups in the first series. It also helps its special effects are a lot better than any Godzilla movie before it. Overall any fan of monster movies should give this one a chance

    The original Return of Godzilla (Not the American recut) is a dark, moody, and gritty monster movie. With its Cold War politics backdrop the movie feels more like a proper sequel to the 1954 original than any of the followups in the first series. It also helps its special effects are a lot better than any Godzilla movie before it. Overall any fan of monster movies should give this one a chance

  • May 25, 2016

    The american version is very silly. But the japan version is realy stunning and obscure.

    The american version is very silly. But the japan version is realy stunning and obscure.