Gonzo: The Life and Work of Hunter S. Thompson Reviews

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September 12, 2018
Gibney's focus on Thompson at his most politically relevant is welcome, but it renders the broader picture less than complete, particularly when it comes to his early life influences.
December 19, 2008
A definitive, accessible, even inspiring screen biography put together with thought and vitality.
December 19, 2008
The film's plea that we need Thompson now more than ever is a little misty-eyed: Thompson's day was long gone by the time he put a gun to his head.
December 19, 2008
Gonzo is much more than a tribute to a maverick and genuine pioneer. It's a lament for the gaping hole that Thompson left behind. The only obvious weakness is Gibney's reluctance to engage fully with Thompson's toxic personal life.
December 19, 2008
This documentary about his life by Alex Gibney, though entertaining in many ways, is oddly uninterested in his strengths or otherwise as a writer, the very gift for which Thompson earnestly wished to be known.
December 19, 2008
Thompson must be looking down, or up, from his afterworld thinking: "The worst success is a failure to keep alive the spirit of offendedness and outrage."
December 19, 2008
This soft-headed hagiography is a disappointment, and at least half an hour too long.
December 19, 2008
This portrait rightly invites admiration for the man's influential talent, while provoking thoughts about the responsibilities of journalism. It's overlong but colourful anecdotes and a zippy 1960s/1970s soundtrack make it entertaining stuff.
December 19, 2008
Gibney says the film took so much out of him that he limped into the Sundance Festival with a ruptured disc, a green liver and spots in his eyes that will not disappear. I hope he now thinks it worth the trouble. I'm pretty sure watchers will.
October 30, 2008
Gonzo is an excellent reminder that Thompson was more than just a wild man. He was, at least for a time, a first-rate writer who covered his times and helped shape them.
October 18, 2008
The worshipfulness obscures the sadder aspects of Thompson's life, which is perhaps why Gibney focuses on the writer's 1965-75 golden years.
October 18, 2008
But Gibney wisely tells much of the story in Thompson's own words, narrated by actor Johnny Depp, who played the writer in the movie version of "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas."
October 18, 2008
Too much time in this overly long film is spent on minutiae.
August 8, 2008
Filmmaker Alex Gibney had access to those who knew the guy, the famous, the infamous and the obscure, and he paints a picture of a serious journalist who saw himself documenting 'the death of the American Dream.'
August 8, 2008
Though Thompson's long slide into irrelevance in the 80s and 90s is duly noted, most of the movie covers his glory days during the Vietnam era, when he was arguably the most exciting and important literary talent in America.
July 18, 2008
Gonzo director Gibney frees himself from the heady topicality of his recent documentaries...and dives right down into the deep -- and dark -- end.
July 18, 2008
[Director] Gibney assembles a wealth of Thompson memorabilia and first-person interviews for this often insightful and sometimes overly indulgent chronicle.
July 18, 2008
An amused and affectionate look at the writer who formed a crucial link between the New Journalism of the 1960s and today's blogosphere.
July 16, 2008
At its worst, the film takes a long detour into Thompson's admiration for an utterly banal 1974 Carter speech (The Powerful were sticking it to The People again) as a way to make us feel virtuous, political and leftish.
July 11, 2008
Neatly balancing full-hearted celebration with evenhanded examination.
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