Goodbye, Dragon Inn Reviews

June 2, 2014
This elegiac 2003 comedy, by the Taiwanese director Tsai Ming-liang, is a requiem for a movie theatre.
January 6, 2005
A weird, funny, melancholy tribute to movies and movie-going, an opus for film geeks that rang my personal bell.
December 17, 2004
Idiosyncratic, oddball movie that is both funny and moody.
October 29, 2004
This is one of the most gorgeous and maturely composed movies you'll see this year.
October 15, 2004
Tsai is hugely popular with film critics, I believe, in part because film critics actually have something to do while watching his films. While the girl is limping down the hallway, we can take notes. Regular theatergoers? They can only watch helplessly.
October 6, 2004
Tsai Ming-Ling's bitter-sweet Goodbye Dragon Inn isn't easy to categorise: an exercise in cinematic minimalism, it's a ghost story, a deadpan comedy, and a lament for an earlier era of film-going.
October 1, 2004
The real star of the movie is the doomed movie house itself, and the dominant subtext is the emotional transaction between the viewer and his (or her) more vividly vicarious adventures projected on-screen.
September 18, 2004
What really sticks with you is the picture's aura of twilight vibrancy, and the deep pleasure Tsai takes in savoring subtle emotions that other filmmakers might not even register.
September 17, 2004
A droll gem that celebrates movie love with feeling and deadpan humor.
September 17, 2004
A loving tribute to cinema by Tsai Ming-liang, one of Taiwan's most accomplished and popular directors.
September 14, 2004
A movie of elegant understatement and considerable formal intelligence.
September 10, 2004
This feels like short film material stretched exasperatingly thin but nonetheless casts a certain sad spell, graced by moments of droll observational humor.
November 13, 2003
It certainly stands as Tsai's most skillful work -- he manages to keep viewer attention for a full 81 minutes with a minimum of action and dialogue.
October 22, 2003
Its simple, meticulously composed frames are full of mystery and feeling; it's an action movie that stands perfectly still.