La Gran final (The Great Match) Reviews

  • Dec 13, 2014

    What an enjoyable heart-felt ride! Loved this film! Cultures form such different parts of the world displaying the same commitment level to a communal playful experience that happens only once every four years. Really well-chronicled by the film makers. Some of the conversations were hysterical as people became impatient trying to get to a TV or maintain the signal to not miss an important moment. "Americans hit a ball with a stick...Isn't that progress?" The lengths people went to was really extraordinary. An Amazonian native running around the jungle with a "9" painted on his back representing his favorite player, an Arabic nobleman from a bygone era sitting in "the" chair being a dick and opposed to the Africans supporting Brazil, and a Mongolian lieutenant at odds with the Brazilian-supporting nomads due to his faith in "German superiority." The only place where there wasn't any friendly competition was of course in Brazil as both the tribesman and transplants were rooting for the same team. Great film. Lots of fun.

    What an enjoyable heart-felt ride! Loved this film! Cultures form such different parts of the world displaying the same commitment level to a communal playful experience that happens only once every four years. Really well-chronicled by the film makers. Some of the conversations were hysterical as people became impatient trying to get to a TV or maintain the signal to not miss an important moment. "Americans hit a ball with a stick...Isn't that progress?" The lengths people went to was really extraordinary. An Amazonian native running around the jungle with a "9" painted on his back representing his favorite player, an Arabic nobleman from a bygone era sitting in "the" chair being a dick and opposed to the Africans supporting Brazil, and a Mongolian lieutenant at odds with the Brazilian-supporting nomads due to his faith in "German superiority." The only place where there wasn't any friendly competition was of course in Brazil as both the tribesman and transplants were rooting for the same team. Great film. Lots of fun.

  • Dec 30, 2012

    Overly precious and obvious. Reminds me of the sort of movie used for filler on weekend morning television in the 70s (but with occasional foreign language profanity). Occasional - very occasional - effective moments.

    Overly precious and obvious. Reminds me of the sort of movie used for filler on weekend morning television in the 70s (but with occasional foreign language profanity). Occasional - very occasional - effective moments.

  • Sep 26, 2012

    This is a whimsical take on the universality of sport - in this case soccer. I really liked it and give it 5 stars. John

    This is a whimsical take on the universality of sport - in this case soccer. I really liked it and give it 5 stars. John

  • Sep 23, 2011

    Entertaining, beautiful, fun and thought provoking especially for soccer lovers

    Entertaining, beautiful, fun and thought provoking especially for soccer lovers

  • Jul 05, 2011

    I don't think being a soccer fan would have helped much on this movie. It sounds cool enough - diehard fans in the remotest of places going to extraordinary lengths (by Western standards) to see the big soccer match. I suspect this movie has delusions of grandeur, but the themes are all rather shallow and further hammed up for Western sensibilities. Soccer unites the unlikeliest of non-Western people through the Western technical marvel of television. Soldiers and nomads in Mongolia, indigenous tribesmen and Western lumber raiders in the rainforest of Brazil, and anachronistic desert royalty with modern-day Arabs & Africans in Niger. The pretensions are manufactured, for the most part. None of the people involved in this film are significantly altering their way of life - rather they incorporate the novelty of television into established routines and ways of doing things. If television is understood as metaphorical for the insidiousness of Western values and technology, in every instance that insidiousness has been met by and large by a wall of apathy and very deliberate choosing. The Mongolian nomads are still nomads, but they follow power lines now as much as the pasturelands. The Brazilian tribesmen are little bothered or concerned with television except for the big game, when they have to find all of the necessary components to watch the game. And the Niger desert-dwellers are all interested in the game (and under cover Playboy magazines), but they are hardly uprooting their lifestyles in order to see it. Nomadic peoples have always gathered for important events that bind them together in ways that under normal circumstances didn't happen. Now that television and soccer are added to the list, it can hardly be seen in itself as part of a spreading Western evil. It's just a more recent addition to an existing list of Important Stuff. That aside, the movie is contrived. The dialogue is stiff and awkward. While there are humorous moments (mostly early on in the film), they are painfully delivered. Rather than showing us actual people and what is actually important to them, we are given a caricature of people and what might be important to them. The effect seems very condescending (even though it may not actually be - it may be very authentic in capturing these vastly different peoples). The effect wears thin after about 30 minutes, and it feels as though the director and writer were trying to fill out the remaining 60 minutes of film. If you're a soccer fanatic, you might be able to empathize with the drive behind these people - but I don't think that such empathy is required to appreciate the movie. It just might make it more bearable.

    I don't think being a soccer fan would have helped much on this movie. It sounds cool enough - diehard fans in the remotest of places going to extraordinary lengths (by Western standards) to see the big soccer match. I suspect this movie has delusions of grandeur, but the themes are all rather shallow and further hammed up for Western sensibilities. Soccer unites the unlikeliest of non-Western people through the Western technical marvel of television. Soldiers and nomads in Mongolia, indigenous tribesmen and Western lumber raiders in the rainforest of Brazil, and anachronistic desert royalty with modern-day Arabs & Africans in Niger. The pretensions are manufactured, for the most part. None of the people involved in this film are significantly altering their way of life - rather they incorporate the novelty of television into established routines and ways of doing things. If television is understood as metaphorical for the insidiousness of Western values and technology, in every instance that insidiousness has been met by and large by a wall of apathy and very deliberate choosing. The Mongolian nomads are still nomads, but they follow power lines now as much as the pasturelands. The Brazilian tribesmen are little bothered or concerned with television except for the big game, when they have to find all of the necessary components to watch the game. And the Niger desert-dwellers are all interested in the game (and under cover Playboy magazines), but they are hardly uprooting their lifestyles in order to see it. Nomadic peoples have always gathered for important events that bind them together in ways that under normal circumstances didn't happen. Now that television and soccer are added to the list, it can hardly be seen in itself as part of a spreading Western evil. It's just a more recent addition to an existing list of Important Stuff. That aside, the movie is contrived. The dialogue is stiff and awkward. While there are humorous moments (mostly early on in the film), they are painfully delivered. Rather than showing us actual people and what is actually important to them, we are given a caricature of people and what might be important to them. The effect seems very condescending (even though it may not actually be - it may be very authentic in capturing these vastly different peoples). The effect wears thin after about 30 minutes, and it feels as though the director and writer were trying to fill out the remaining 60 minutes of film. If you're a soccer fanatic, you might be able to empathize with the drive behind these people - but I don't think that such empathy is required to appreciate the movie. It just might make it more bearable.

  • May 15, 2011

    Divya picked it off the library shelf by chance and thought it was a great teething toy... so brought it home and it turned out to be a great pick!

    Divya picked it off the library shelf by chance and thought it was a great teething toy... so brought it home and it turned out to be a great pick!

  • Dec 25, 2009

    Above any cultural or geographical barriers, human beings want to be part of a human fellowship. Three tribal groups; mongolian nomads, Saharan's Tuaregs and Amazonian indians find ways to connect to this global fellowship through Football (soccer). The cinematography of the Great Match, part of the film movement, is outstanding and breathtaking, contrasting the beauty of the Saharan dessert, the Amazon jungle and the mongolian steppes. Gerardo Olivares' film presents humorous and colorful insights of people's experiences overcoming obstacles to watch on T.V. the finals of the soccer world cup between Brazil and Germany. Although these are different ethnic groups, this brilliant film reveals a common thread in the share attitudes, values, goals an practices of soccer fans and their relation to ethnicity, gender, age, social class and modernity. Despite all their differences, it seems like soccer fans act the same, all over the world. Although the film focuses mainly on men behavior, the winner of the film is the witty personality of the observer, a mongolian grandma. In particular, she in one punch line summarizes the message of the movie: How was your day grandma? asked her grandson, she responds "Fine as usual, my boy, another day witnessing existence in bewilderment."

    Above any cultural or geographical barriers, human beings want to be part of a human fellowship. Three tribal groups; mongolian nomads, Saharan's Tuaregs and Amazonian indians find ways to connect to this global fellowship through Football (soccer). The cinematography of the Great Match, part of the film movement, is outstanding and breathtaking, contrasting the beauty of the Saharan dessert, the Amazon jungle and the mongolian steppes. Gerardo Olivares' film presents humorous and colorful insights of people's experiences overcoming obstacles to watch on T.V. the finals of the soccer world cup between Brazil and Germany. Although these are different ethnic groups, this brilliant film reveals a common thread in the share attitudes, values, goals an practices of soccer fans and their relation to ethnicity, gender, age, social class and modernity. Despite all their differences, it seems like soccer fans act the same, all over the world. Although the film focuses mainly on men behavior, the winner of the film is the witty personality of the observer, a mongolian grandma. In particular, she in one punch line summarizes the message of the movie: How was your day grandma? asked her grandson, she responds "Fine as usual, my boy, another day witnessing existence in bewilderment."

  • Sep 27, 2009

    supporters of the world unite1

    supporters of the world unite1

  • Sep 09, 2009

    Hilarious and out of this world

    Hilarious and out of this world

  • Apr 16, 2009

    El amor por el fútbol es mundial!!

    El amor por el fútbol es mundial!!