Hands of Stone Reviews

Page 1 of 2
November 20, 2017
Hands of Stone isn't the black eye on the boxing genre, but it presents the genre at its most mediocre and formulaic.
December 31, 2016
All this cacophony of backstory ends up being counterproductive, especially when the film tries to convey what makes this fighter worthy of tribute (or forgiveness or reconsideration, depending on your perspective).
November 8, 2016
Very well acted, entertaining and informative.
August 27, 2016
Traditional and uninspired, it does an adequate job of relating Duran's story but falls short of providing an engaging cinematic experience.
August 27, 2016
There are some engaging asides about Arcel's struggles with boxing's dirty underbelly, but they feel like they belong to a different movie. (De Niro's superfluous and soporific voiceover, however, belongs in no movie whatsoever.)
August 26, 2016
Unfortunately, Jakubowicz just doesn't seem to have the first clue as to how to give any of this the sort of emotional zip Durn's story calls for.
August 26, 2016
In trying to encompass way too much, Hands of Stone ends up feeling superficial and unsatisfying.
August 26, 2016
"Hands of Stone" is less like a boxing flick and more like a professional wrestling battle royale with all its different subplots angling for main event status.
August 26, 2016
It's engaging, sure, with some fast-paced and capable fight sequences.
August 25, 2016
While Mr. Ramrez is excellent at portraying Durn's cockiness and imposing physicality, the movie struggles to make him a well-rounded character.
August 25, 2016
Hands of Stone is a rousing, well-filmed and solid (if at times overly generous to Duran) biopic with a bounty of charismatic performances, two of the sexier scenes of the year, some welcome laughs and a few above average fight sequences.
August 25, 2016
Ramirez is solidly compelling as Duran, the complicated pit bull that he is, but the audience is kept at a distance and isn't given an opportunity to truly empathize.
August 25, 2016
The movie's best moments are all intimate, tracing the rocky friendships that Duran (Edgar Ramirez) forged with his longtime trainer and mentor, Ray Arcel (Robert De Niro), and his most notorious opponent in the ring, Sugar Ray Leonard (Usher Raymond).
August 25, 2016
Roberto Durn is a role that requires both subtlety and brutality. Mr. Ramirez obliges.
August 25, 2016
If ever there were a film that shoulda-coulda-woulda been great, it's Hands of Stone, an ambitious but disappointing biopic about Panamanian fighter Roberto Durn.
August 25, 2016
It's too diffuse a biography to understand how a boxer could have all that fire in his belly doused so quickly.
August 25, 2016
Durn is about as admirable as algae from the moment we meet him. The best you can say about him is he managed to get rich being pond scum.
August 25, 2016
The movie needs ms -- mucho ms. As Durn, Edgar Ramrez accesses the playboy arrogance he channeled for Carlos, but he's stranded by a timid script that doesn't give him enough private moments.
August 25, 2016
The highlight is Duran and Arcel's bonding in the corner between rounds. We'll take more of this revealing brand of drama anytime.
August 25, 2016
"Hands of Stone" seems hellbent on setting a world record for most subplots, and the scenes are spliced together so rapidly it's as if some projectionist - or the digital equivalent, anyway - accidentally hit fast-forward.
Page 1 of 2