Hannah Gadsby: Nanette Reviews

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July 19, 2018
She offers an alternative to privilege and hate that is so simple, so beautiful and so right, it shimmers.
July 19, 2018
The laughs of her show are a means to an end, which is, at its core, a ferocious attack on comedy itself.
July 19, 2018
And we laugh at every joke, because they're funny and devoid of any reason to feel guilty for laughing. Then she turns her entire set on its head.
July 19, 2018
One of the things Gadsby is doing is exploring tools for telling stories, particularly stories of trauma.
July 11, 2018
Gadsby refuses to alleviate the guilt of problematic white dudes, and I'm here for it.
July 10, 2018
The laughs are a distant memory by the time the curtain falls, and you are left with an incredibly powerful message: This is my truth, tell me yours.
July 6, 2018
Highly recommended, but fair warning: it's not just funny.
July 6, 2018
Storytelling is important to Gadsby, and the biggest point she makes in the special is that we've been telling ourselves stories the wrong way.
July 5, 2018
Gadsby invites us in, pushes us back. She reveals and withdraws and then finally, devastatingly, reveals so much that the pain and anger seeps from the screen. It is remarkable.
July 5, 2018
What Gadsby does in this unassuming sneak attack is disassembly of the artistry and trick of comedy itself.
July 5, 2018
It might not be the funniest routine you watch all year, but it's unique, and it will make you think.
July 5, 2018
It's a powerful rejection of comedy itself.
July 3, 2018
In Nanette we witness the shock of the new, a voice that dares to speak to this frustrating and often hideous cultural moment, a comedian willing to drop the act. I would call Gadsby a genius, but she would likely push back against that term.
Top Critic
July 3, 2018
This is different. Not a little different, but totally different.
July 2, 2018
Hannah Gadsby's Nanette is the mic drop to end all mic drops-a cross between comedy special and one-woman show that's actually a 69-minute Dear John letter to the entire enterprise of stand-up.
June 28, 2018
A devastating, furious farewell.
June 28, 2018
Art, Gadsby makes clear-from painting to comedy-does not liberate everyone equally. It can replicate the same privileges and exclusions as the culture in which it was made.
June 28, 2018
In Nanette, Gadsby strains against the impulse to end every joke with a punchline. To diffuse the tension as such would be a cop-out. She wants the audience to sit with it...powerful, uncomfortable, and searingly angry.
June 28, 2018
It is an extremely angry hour, an extremely cathartic one and an extremely necessary one. An art form cannot thrive if it refuses to look itself in the face and question its own necessity.
June 28, 2018
Her finale is a blistering, impassioned plea for empathy, a furious call to action, and a battle cry to do better.
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