Hapkido - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Hapkido Reviews

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½ September 9, 2015
Tourné quasiment en même temps que Fist of Fury, Hapkido est l'archétype parfait du film de kung-fu des années 70. Entre le titre français qui n'a rien à voir avec le film, le nationalisme exacerbé qui fait des japonais des tortionnaires et des chinois des héros honorables, les scènes de combat délirantes (sans pour autant abuser sur les câbles, restant alors crédibles) où on se retrouve souvent à 1 vs 20, la musique très funky qui ne se prive pas de quelques gros riffs de guitare lors de zooms sur les protagonistes principaux et les dialogues qui parlent d'humilité et de patience, Hapkido est un parfait mix de tout ce qui a rendu le kung-fu pian légendaire. Carter Wong et Sammo Hung sont bons, mais Angela Mao est tout simplement parfaite en pacifiste obligée de se venger. Feng Huang parvient à garder tout cela rythmé et offre quelques jolis plans pendant les bastons. Hapkido est un très bon film, même au premier degré.
July 22, 2013
Typical Martial Arts Film From The 1970's Starring Angela Mao, Typical But Interesting & Better Made Than Most Films From 70's Chinese Cinema. The Film Was Released In 1972, The Same Time As Bruce Lee's "Fist Of Fury", & Features A Similar Storyline.
Both Films Focus On Warring Martial Arts Schools, Unlike "Fist Of Fury", The Japanese In This Film Are Portrayed As One-Sided, Xenophobic & More Racist & Are Also Referred To As "Japs" By The Main Characters. The Film Is Based Before WW2, Before The Japanese Occupation Of China Or Just At The Start Of It Anyway.
Mao's Character Is A Pacifist Torn Between Her Extreme Commitment And Beliefs Of Non-Aggression & Righting The Wrongs On Which The Japanese Have Done, With Them Destroying The Local Town & Murder.
Mao Is A Terrific Actress & This Is A Good Film To See It As Her Martial Arts Skill Are On Top Form Here With Her Appearing In Some Really Good Choreographed Fight Scenes. Her General Acting Skills Are Also On Top Form With The Way She Presents & Performs Her Character, From Great Line Delivery To Some Really Good Facial Expressions.
August 19, 2011
It shares similar parallels with Bruce Lee's Fist of Fury, but an excellent martial arts movie. A lot of familiar faces show up in this, from the Hapkido master also being the Hapkido villain in Bruce Lee's Game of Death. A young Ching-Ying Lam plays a henchman, and we get to see a young Sammo Hung and Carter Wong.

The story is simple. Three Hapkido students attempt to open up a school in Japan invaded China, but are constantly in trouble when the Japanese Black Bear school bullies the local residents. Once blood is shed, both sides begin to stop pulling their punches until the action packed climax.

It was truly a visceral experience, as the camera angles were very dynamic and engaging. Mix in some excellent fight scenes for a classic martial arts movie, just as good as Fist of Fury.
May 29, 2011
This film made Angela Mao an international action star. It's a must see for fans of 70's Kung Fu action films.
deano
Super Reviewer
½ January 23, 2011
Interesting typical kung-fu film from the 1970s with Angela Mao.
I saw a number of interesting parallels between this flick and Bruce Lee's Fist of Fury as both films were released in 1972. Most notable is that the plots bear some resemblance to one another and there is a strong sense of conflict between warning martial arts schools. Unlike Fist of Fury, however, the enemy, the Japanese, are portrayed in a flagrant, one-sided, racist, and xenophobic light; they are sometimes referred to as "Japs" by the main Chinese characters (I know this film is set before World War II - I wonder, did such racial epithets exist before then?).
Mao's character is really interesting because she's a pacifist torn between her belief in non-aggression and righting her enemy's wrongdoings. She displays her fighting skills in several scenes and she acts really well especially with her facial expressions.
½ January 23, 2011
Interesting typical kung-fu film from the 1970s with Angela Mao.
I saw a number of interesting parallels between this flick and Bruce Lee's Fist of Fury as both films were released in 1972. Most notable is that the plots bear some resemblance to one another and there is a strong sense of conflict between warning martial arts schools. Unlike Fist of Fury, however, the enemy, the Japanese, are portrayed in a flagrant, one-sided, racist, and xenophobic light; they are sometimes referred to as "Japs" by the main Chinese characters (I know this film is set before World War II - I wonder, did such racial epithets exist before then?).
Mao's character is really interesting because she's a pacifist torn between her belief in non-aggression and righting her enemy's wrongdoings. She displays her fighting skills in several scenes and she acts really well especially with her facial expressions.
½ June 21, 2009
37 years old movie, but I think it is a high-class movie at that time. Slowed shots, high-quality image and quite good cut. The story is not so strong, but fights are good as well. Angela Mao is really quick.
March 26, 2009
Brilliant,filmed at the same time as Fist Of Fury but with some great Korean style MA in there,Angela is dynamic as hell in there.
(I have the Hong Kong Legends DVD complete with subs..mint)
January 8, 2009
Hey, hapkido on film! If only I had a subtitled version, then I would be able to understand what the heck was going on!
September 13, 2008
I consider this as a kung fu classic. The story is not too original (ripped off from the Fist of Fury), but the fight scenes are just great. Angela Mao rules big time!
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