Harlan - Im Schatten von Jud Süss (Harlan: In the Shadow of Jew Seuss) Reviews

  • Apr 07, 2012

    What is initially interesting turns out to be a string of drawn-out interviews. Could have been made better, but it was not.

    What is initially interesting turns out to be a string of drawn-out interviews. Could have been made better, but it was not.

  • Jun 09, 2011

    It's certainly worth thinking about the values officially promoted by Nazi Germany. But who cares about the motivations or self-justifications (in short, the subjectivity) of a petty bourgeois careerist film-maker (in Nazi Germany or elsewhere), or the opinions of his surviving family members (naturally, the anti-Nazi or even perhaps communist son being the most intellectually and morally advanced)? Most of all (in the context of this film), consider the continuities between Nazi Germany and capitalist NATO-member (West) Germany.

    It's certainly worth thinking about the values officially promoted by Nazi Germany. But who cares about the motivations or self-justifications (in short, the subjectivity) of a petty bourgeois careerist film-maker (in Nazi Germany or elsewhere), or the opinions of his surviving family members (naturally, the anti-Nazi or even perhaps communist son being the most intellectually and morally advanced)? Most of all (in the context of this film), consider the continuities between Nazi Germany and capitalist NATO-member (West) Germany.

  • May 24, 2011

    Like so many docs these days, this one can be quite repetitive at times, but it is fascinating to see how the actions of on person can have effects seen 3 or 4 generations out.

    Like so many docs these days, this one can be quite repetitive at times, but it is fascinating to see how the actions of on person can have effects seen 3 or 4 generations out.

  • Mar 28, 2011

    A great docu even though I'd liked to have heard more from the man himself. I was very clever edited to bring the message across about the impact the film had on them and their children and grandchildren.

    A great docu even though I'd liked to have heard more from the man himself. I was very clever edited to bring the message across about the impact the film had on them and their children and grandchildren.

  • Dec 24, 2010

    History is always complicated - and painful.

    History is always complicated - and painful.

  • Dec 19, 2010

    It is interesting to see how a family struggles in so many ways to deal with the inheritance of guilt that reaches back 70 years. It is a thought provoking film in that explores the issue of propaganda movies, their impact on societies and the role the "artist" assumes in his/her time. It's a challenging subject for sure, hence for the historically interested this is a good watch. (Netflix HD stream)

    It is interesting to see how a family struggles in so many ways to deal with the inheritance of guilt that reaches back 70 years. It is a thought provoking film in that explores the issue of propaganda movies, their impact on societies and the role the "artist" assumes in his/her time. It's a challenging subject for sure, hence for the historically interested this is a good watch. (Netflix HD stream)

  • May 02, 2010

    A thought-provoking documentary that wrestles with the nature of guilt and penance generations after the fact. The movie illustrates the different ways in which the progeny of German filmmaker Veit Harlan have dealt with the legacy of his propaganda films for the Nazis, in particular the infamous Jew Süss. The film shows how different members of the family view Harlan and his wife's culpability in what they did. The movie offers some snippets of the movie and covers some of the director's post-war career. The sequences visually mirror many from Frankenstein of all things, right down to the angry villagers carrying torches and a drowned victim. His story in itself would have been interesting, but the fact that Harlan's eldest son became a Nazi hunter of sorts adds another fascinating layer to this story. The connections to Stanley Kubrick (he married Harlan's niece and even had an opportunity to meet him) are an interesting footnote as well. My personal take is that I side with Thomas Harlan's assessments of his father; its hard to forgive when you compare his story with that of say, Fritz Lang who made the decision to leave Germany.

    A thought-provoking documentary that wrestles with the nature of guilt and penance generations after the fact. The movie illustrates the different ways in which the progeny of German filmmaker Veit Harlan have dealt with the legacy of his propaganda films for the Nazis, in particular the infamous Jew Süss. The film shows how different members of the family view Harlan and his wife's culpability in what they did. The movie offers some snippets of the movie and covers some of the director's post-war career. The sequences visually mirror many from Frankenstein of all things, right down to the angry villagers carrying torches and a drowned victim. His story in itself would have been interesting, but the fact that Harlan's eldest son became a Nazi hunter of sorts adds another fascinating layer to this story. The connections to Stanley Kubrick (he married Harlan's niece and even had an opportunity to meet him) are an interesting footnote as well. My personal take is that I side with Thomas Harlan's assessments of his father; its hard to forgive when you compare his story with that of say, Fritz Lang who made the decision to leave Germany.

  • cody f Super Reviewer
    Mar 22, 2010

    What a waste of time. This could have been a good doc, and it had everything going for it. Great subject matter with plenty of footage, conflict within a family, Kubrick's wife, and Nazi's. Moeller turns what should have been a 30 minute doc into a 2 hour borefest. It's also about Harlan making Jew Suss and he only shows about 5 minutes of the whole film, so you never get to see how offensive it really was. It repeats itself over and over and you never learn anything about Harlan or his real influence during the Nazi Regime. Watch The Wonderful Horrible Life of Leni Riefenstahl if you want to see a great doc about a Nazi filmmaker, because this one is a total waste of time.

    What a waste of time. This could have been a good doc, and it had everything going for it. Great subject matter with plenty of footage, conflict within a family, Kubrick's wife, and Nazi's. Moeller turns what should have been a 30 minute doc into a 2 hour borefest. It's also about Harlan making Jew Suss and he only shows about 5 minutes of the whole film, so you never get to see how offensive it really was. It repeats itself over and over and you never learn anything about Harlan or his real influence during the Nazi Regime. Watch The Wonderful Horrible Life of Leni Riefenstahl if you want to see a great doc about a Nazi filmmaker, because this one is a total waste of time.

  • Mar 06, 2010

    Veit Harlan made feature films in Nazi Germany with enough ideological content to be tried twice for crimes against humanity. His children and grandchildren wrestle with his legacy and a stigmatized surname to this day. Much here could be translated onto our discussions of DW Griffith or of anyone complicit in atrocities. How much of it was just work and the need to secure an ongoing livelihood? how much of it was infused with passion and initiative? what responsibility do artists have for the consequences of their works? The main complaint here is that the film is amateurishly subtitled that frequently obscures what is being said.

    Veit Harlan made feature films in Nazi Germany with enough ideological content to be tried twice for crimes against humanity. His children and grandchildren wrestle with his legacy and a stigmatized surname to this day. Much here could be translated onto our discussions of DW Griffith or of anyone complicit in atrocities. How much of it was just work and the need to secure an ongoing livelihood? how much of it was infused with passion and initiative? what responsibility do artists have for the consequences of their works? The main complaint here is that the film is amateurishly subtitled that frequently obscures what is being said.

  • Mar 06, 2010

    It goes without saying: guilt runs deep; although sometimes it's not even your fault.

    It goes without saying: guilt runs deep; although sometimes it's not even your fault.