Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Impassioned Eye (2006) - Rotten Tomatoes

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Impassioned Eye (2006)

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Impassioned Eye (2006)

TOMATOMETER

——

——

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Impassioned Eye Photos

Movie Info

Upon his death in 2004 at the age of 96, peripatetic photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson was mourned as "the father of photojournalism." Though the camera-shy shutterbug was reluctant to offer himself up as a subject, this documentary from director Heinz Bütler offers a rare moment alone with the photographer as he explores his portfolio and offers detailed insight into the remarkable images that moved millions. Focusing in particular on Cartier-Bresson's widely acclaimed work from the period ranging from the '40s through the '60s, director Bütler explores the stories behind the photographer's stunning images of such historical events as the death of Gandhi and the liberation of Paris.

Cast

Critic Reviews for Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Impassioned Eye

All Critics (2) | Top Critics (1)

[Director] Bütler maintains a staid, steady pace, with still more pictures, and still more chatter about the pictures, and nothing challenging said.

November 27, 2006
AV Club
Top Critic

Not a particularly overtly political documentary, yet effective, given that Monsieur Henri was most definitely blessed with an eye for freezing reality via the magic of still photography.

Full Review… | May 26, 2007
Upstage Magazine

Audience Reviews for Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Impassioned Eye

½

To its credit, this documentary is not so much interested in the details of the personal life and long career of Henri Cartier-Bresson, photojournalist, but in what makes a great photographer.(Although you can infer some of the details from the photographs on display.) Basically, it comes down to framing a shot and timing, not only being in the right place at the right time(he was visiting Gandhi right before he was assassinated, so he was in a perfect position to record the country's reaction), but also to take the photograph at precisely the right time to capture that moment that would have otherwise been lost to eternity. With portraits, he has never posed his subjects, again waiting for that magic moment, as Isabelle Huppert and Arthur Miller testify to. At the time of this documentary, Cartier-Bresson is content to stand still in one place for a change and work on his painting.

Walter M.
Walter M.

Super Reviewer

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Impassioned Eye Quotes

There are no approved quotes yet for this movie.

Discussion Forum

Discuss Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Impassioned Eye on our Movie forum!

News & Features