High Sierra Reviews

  • Mar 19, 2021

    Humphrey Bogart stars as Roy Earle, an experienced, master thief and consummate professional who ... lets his plans be compromised by a dog, falls for two different women while claiming they only cause trouble (including a random act of philanthropy where he pays for a major surgery for one without ever hinting at a romance), and goes to the bus stop for a farewell and out to buy cigarettes despite knowing that his face is plastered over all the newspapers as the subject of a huge manhunt. Actually, maybe he's not that great of a criminal. High Sierra isn't considered one of the acclaimed actor's defining pictures, and with good reason. It's definitely more of a formative film in the advent of noir, full of plenty of the wise-guy jabs (Bogart literally starts a note, "To the coppers") and a criminal element, but the characters are half-baked and inconsistent; the one-sided relationship between Roy and Leslie's Velma is supposed to demonstrate some sort of lost innocence and underlying morality, but it falls flat. A lot of the film is plain dull, and the presence of Willie Best in one of his typical roles is usually not something that endears a film to history, either. Something of an ignominious start for Huston as a writer, but he certainly turned it around with time. That's not to say that High Sierra is a failure, it's got plenty going for it, particularly the use of considerable on-location shooting in the California wilderness, and a classic performance from the lead. Seeing Bogart break a counter for a pack of cigarettes during a hotel heist after an attendant had bugged him for payment for the same item earlier is pure cool, and one of the best wordless scenes you could hope for to demonstrate what a character is about. Funny enough, High Sierra actually seems to reference an unrelated and very different type of film: the 1940 W.C. Fields comedy, The Bank Dick. One of the characters tells a story in which two robbers hold up a bank, only to find that the car they left running has been taken, and subsequently duck down an alley where they run into someone that apprehends them. That's too much of a similarity to be a coincidence, right? (3.5/5)

    Humphrey Bogart stars as Roy Earle, an experienced, master thief and consummate professional who ... lets his plans be compromised by a dog, falls for two different women while claiming they only cause trouble (including a random act of philanthropy where he pays for a major surgery for one without ever hinting at a romance), and goes to the bus stop for a farewell and out to buy cigarettes despite knowing that his face is plastered over all the newspapers as the subject of a huge manhunt. Actually, maybe he's not that great of a criminal. High Sierra isn't considered one of the acclaimed actor's defining pictures, and with good reason. It's definitely more of a formative film in the advent of noir, full of plenty of the wise-guy jabs (Bogart literally starts a note, "To the coppers") and a criminal element, but the characters are half-baked and inconsistent; the one-sided relationship between Roy and Leslie's Velma is supposed to demonstrate some sort of lost innocence and underlying morality, but it falls flat. A lot of the film is plain dull, and the presence of Willie Best in one of his typical roles is usually not something that endears a film to history, either. Something of an ignominious start for Huston as a writer, but he certainly turned it around with time. That's not to say that High Sierra is a failure, it's got plenty going for it, particularly the use of considerable on-location shooting in the California wilderness, and a classic performance from the lead. Seeing Bogart break a counter for a pack of cigarettes during a hotel heist after an attendant had bugged him for payment for the same item earlier is pure cool, and one of the best wordless scenes you could hope for to demonstrate what a character is about. Funny enough, High Sierra actually seems to reference an unrelated and very different type of film: the 1940 W.C. Fields comedy, The Bank Dick. One of the characters tells a story in which two robbers hold up a bank, only to find that the car they left running has been taken, and subsequently duck down an alley where they run into someone that apprehends them. That's too much of a similarity to be a coincidence, right? (3.5/5)

  • Dec 06, 2020

    This is the Orginal version-Remake was 'I died 1000 times' with Shelly Winters and Jack Palance

    This is the Orginal version-Remake was 'I died 1000 times' with Shelly Winters and Jack Palance

  • Oct 27, 2020

    Appreciated the level of humanity and naturalness Bogart brought to the anti hero lead in this untraditional noir gangster flick. 6.5/10

    Appreciated the level of humanity and naturalness Bogart brought to the anti hero lead in this untraditional noir gangster flick. 6.5/10

  • Jul 19, 2020

    By today's standards, it's a story that's been overdone. But this is Bogart with John Huston and W.R. Burnett (Scarface, Little Caesar and later The Asphalt Jungle) doing the screenplay. It's a successful combination and one that proved to be a stepping stone that helped Bogart reach incredible heights.

    By today's standards, it's a story that's been overdone. But this is Bogart with John Huston and W.R. Burnett (Scarface, Little Caesar and later The Asphalt Jungle) doing the screenplay. It's a successful combination and one that proved to be a stepping stone that helped Bogart reach incredible heights.

  • Aug 13, 2019

    Great film noir classic. Humphrey Bogart finally achieves actual stardom as he stars in Raoul Walsh's rousing gangster caper adapted for the big screen by John Huston from the novel by W.R. Burnett. Bogie , who became a major movie star in 1941, same year in which Maltese Falcon was also released. Although Bogie is the main character in the movie, top billing went to Ida Lupino, who plays a gangster's moll. I am impressed by the performance of Ida Lupino, notice her dialogue and facial expressions , fabulous . Lupino was one of the great B actresses who delivered A level performance on camera and also sitting in the directors chair. Bogie is Roy "Mad Dog" Earle, a newly-released ex-convict, who intends to make one last score with a small mob hiding out in a mountain cabin. A caper that would lead to a police chase in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Also starring Arthur Kennedy, Joan Leslie, Alan Curtis, Henry Travers, Jerome Cowan, Barton MacLane, Henry Hull, Elizabeth Risdon, Cornel Wilde, Donald MacBride, Paul Harvey, Isabel Jewell, George Meeker, Willie Best & John Eldredge. 9/10

    Great film noir classic. Humphrey Bogart finally achieves actual stardom as he stars in Raoul Walsh's rousing gangster caper adapted for the big screen by John Huston from the novel by W.R. Burnett. Bogie , who became a major movie star in 1941, same year in which Maltese Falcon was also released. Although Bogie is the main character in the movie, top billing went to Ida Lupino, who plays a gangster's moll. I am impressed by the performance of Ida Lupino, notice her dialogue and facial expressions , fabulous . Lupino was one of the great B actresses who delivered A level performance on camera and also sitting in the directors chair. Bogie is Roy "Mad Dog" Earle, a newly-released ex-convict, who intends to make one last score with a small mob hiding out in a mountain cabin. A caper that would lead to a police chase in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Also starring Arthur Kennedy, Joan Leslie, Alan Curtis, Henry Travers, Jerome Cowan, Barton MacLane, Henry Hull, Elizabeth Risdon, Cornel Wilde, Donald MacBride, Paul Harvey, Isabel Jewell, George Meeker, Willie Best & John Eldredge. 9/10

  • Aug 12, 2019

    it was a great movie.bogart was great.i love his movies.

    it was a great movie.bogart was great.i love his movies.

  • May 10, 2019

    High Sierra is an excellent film. It is about a notorious thief who is hired by his old boss to help a group of inexperienced criminals plan and carry out the robbery of a California resort. Humphrey Bogart and Ida Lupino give amazing performances. The screenplay is well written. Raoul Walsh did a great job directing this movie. I enjoyed watching this motion picture because of the action and mystery. High Sierra is a must see.

    High Sierra is an excellent film. It is about a notorious thief who is hired by his old boss to help a group of inexperienced criminals plan and carry out the robbery of a California resort. Humphrey Bogart and Ida Lupino give amazing performances. The screenplay is well written. Raoul Walsh did a great job directing this movie. I enjoyed watching this motion picture because of the action and mystery. High Sierra is a must see.

  • Dec 13, 2018

    Not in the Casablanca class

    Not in the Casablanca class

  • May 01, 2017

    It is easy to understand why this film was the basis of two remakes (Colorado Territory and I Died A Thousand Times) being the original classic high quality romantic/crime thriller film noir it is. What else to expect from John Huston? Superbly written, cast, acted, directed , and edited Bogart is in his element especially showing us the great internal regret of being a criminal and falling for the innocence of a fine young girl like Velma. Not even a gracious act of helping her walk normally again can fix that. At the same time it is a poignant illustration that no one know where the heart of a woman goes - not even them. When she says "I just don't love him Pa." and bursts into tears these two human emotions collide then become one. This is not a film to be missed. A masterpiece of storytelling and film making.

    It is easy to understand why this film was the basis of two remakes (Colorado Territory and I Died A Thousand Times) being the original classic high quality romantic/crime thriller film noir it is. What else to expect from John Huston? Superbly written, cast, acted, directed , and edited Bogart is in his element especially showing us the great internal regret of being a criminal and falling for the innocence of a fine young girl like Velma. Not even a gracious act of helping her walk normally again can fix that. At the same time it is a poignant illustration that no one know where the heart of a woman goes - not even them. When she says "I just don't love him Pa." and bursts into tears these two human emotions collide then become one. This is not a film to be missed. A masterpiece of storytelling and film making.

  • Mar 05, 2016

    A greek tragedy of a gangster epic that helped define Bogart, and set the stage for what was to follow.

    A greek tragedy of a gangster epic that helped define Bogart, and set the stage for what was to follow.