House of Dark Shadows Reviews

  • 1d ago

    This movie is not canon to the original series but it does have the charm from the series, but in a movie fashion also the plot line is much different than the series

    This movie is not canon to the original series but it does have the charm from the series, but in a movie fashion also the plot line is much different than the series

  • Jan 17, 2019

    House of Dark Shadows is a decent film. It is about vampire Barnabas Collins who is accidentally released from his centuries-long confinement at his family's estate in Maine. Jonathan Frid and Grayson Hall give okay performances. The screenplay is a little slow in places. Dan Curtis did an alright job directing this movie. I liked this motion picture because of the drama and fantasy.

    House of Dark Shadows is a decent film. It is about vampire Barnabas Collins who is accidentally released from his centuries-long confinement at his family's estate in Maine. Jonathan Frid and Grayson Hall give okay performances. The screenplay is a little slow in places. Dan Curtis did an alright job directing this movie. I liked this motion picture because of the drama and fantasy.

  • Oct 29, 2017

    This was horrible, and I’m a latecomer fan of the daytime serial!

    This was horrible, and I’m a latecomer fan of the daytime serial!

  • Oct 28, 2017

    The script was mediocre, but the idea was fantastic. The actors did well & the lighting/cinematography holds up well - with the exception of brief special effects. What a great location & sets as well.

    The script was mediocre, but the idea was fantastic. The actors did well & the lighting/cinematography holds up well - with the exception of brief special effects. What a great location & sets as well.

  • May 15, 2016

    House of Dark Shadows is probably the best vampire film since Bela Lugosi's original Dracula. Taking the villian and turning him into a sympathetic hero and then get betrayed and thus converting him back into a villian is brilliant. Obviously, those who viewed the TV shw prior t the film have a better appreciation than those who did not, nevertheless, iti is a different and unique twist which is capably pulled off by shakespearean actor Frid and the supporting cast. Bravo! even 46 years later!

    House of Dark Shadows is probably the best vampire film since Bela Lugosi's original Dracula. Taking the villian and turning him into a sympathetic hero and then get betrayed and thus converting him back into a villian is brilliant. Obviously, those who viewed the TV shw prior t the film have a better appreciation than those who did not, nevertheless, iti is a different and unique twist which is capably pulled off by shakespearean actor Frid and the supporting cast. Bravo! even 46 years later!

  • Dec 11, 2015

    This rating is based on the old-fashioned, vampire genre b-movie, which this essentially is.. This is the film adaptation of the daytime serial on ABC from 1966-1971. The actors recreate their roles and more or less compact 5 years of daily soap episodes into 1.5 hours. It is 1970 TV-movie quality, and basically sticks to the classic 1930s vampire genre, complete with cape, inability to tolerate the sunlight, lack of mirror reflection, and of course the stake in the heart. It is just a fun romp especially for those of us who skipped college classes to watch it!

    This rating is based on the old-fashioned, vampire genre b-movie, which this essentially is.. This is the film adaptation of the daytime serial on ABC from 1966-1971. The actors recreate their roles and more or less compact 5 years of daily soap episodes into 1.5 hours. It is 1970 TV-movie quality, and basically sticks to the classic 1930s vampire genre, complete with cape, inability to tolerate the sunlight, lack of mirror reflection, and of course the stake in the heart. It is just a fun romp especially for those of us who skipped college classes to watch it!

  • Oct 03, 2015

    Although he is not generally considered to be an auteur, Dan Curtis is a filmmaker whose work is instantly recognizable. Part of this comes from his love of the zoom lens, his often hurried, chaotic staging, and the sudden stings of dramatic music by his usual composer Robert Colbert. All of it creates an atmosphere that immediately brings to mind the film and television of the early 1970s. The soap opera Dark Shadows was Curtis' baby and it ran on ABC from 1966-1971 hitting the peak of its popularity with the release of this film in 1970. While the show had many long running storylines and even storylines in different eras, Curtis decided that the film version was going to tell the Barnabas vampire tale alone. Audiences were a bit shocked by how much harsher the film version of the show was, with a Barnabas that was much less sympathetic and violence that was, well, violent.  With a tightly focused vampire story, Curtis produced a film which has the feel of a classic Hammer film. This is ironic as the real Hammer Films had been struggling with a way to bring their gothic style into the modern era as evidenced by their early 70s failures Dracula A.D. 1972 and The Satanic Rites of Dracula. Curtis realized that it wasn't achieved by including blue jeans, nightclubs and airplanes but by drawing the story back into an insular world that is essentially timeless. The film is aided immeasurably in this regard by its location photography in upstate New York and Connecticut. It's a film of old cemetaries, large monasteries and country houses.  The biggest difference between the show and film is that the show often traded on a certain low rent charm. Cheap looking FX, wobbly sets, and actors who became lost in the dialogue. The film is well mounted and stylishly produced. In what must've seemed like a luxury, Jonathan Frid had time to learn ALL his lines.

    Although he is not generally considered to be an auteur, Dan Curtis is a filmmaker whose work is instantly recognizable. Part of this comes from his love of the zoom lens, his often hurried, chaotic staging, and the sudden stings of dramatic music by his usual composer Robert Colbert. All of it creates an atmosphere that immediately brings to mind the film and television of the early 1970s. The soap opera Dark Shadows was Curtis' baby and it ran on ABC from 1966-1971 hitting the peak of its popularity with the release of this film in 1970. While the show had many long running storylines and even storylines in different eras, Curtis decided that the film version was going to tell the Barnabas vampire tale alone. Audiences were a bit shocked by how much harsher the film version of the show was, with a Barnabas that was much less sympathetic and violence that was, well, violent.  With a tightly focused vampire story, Curtis produced a film which has the feel of a classic Hammer film. This is ironic as the real Hammer Films had been struggling with a way to bring their gothic style into the modern era as evidenced by their early 70s failures Dracula A.D. 1972 and The Satanic Rites of Dracula. Curtis realized that it wasn't achieved by including blue jeans, nightclubs and airplanes but by drawing the story back into an insular world that is essentially timeless. The film is aided immeasurably in this regard by its location photography in upstate New York and Connecticut. It's a film of old cemetaries, large monasteries and country houses.  The biggest difference between the show and film is that the show often traded on a certain low rent charm. Cheap looking FX, wobbly sets, and actors who became lost in the dialogue. The film is well mounted and stylishly produced. In what must've seemed like a luxury, Jonathan Frid had time to learn ALL his lines.

  • Nov 20, 2013

    Gran bel film horror vecchio stile.

    Gran bel film horror vecchio stile.

  • Jun 12, 2013

    I love the series and this movie. Would love to see the extended version Dan Curtis made before the studio demanded the cuts.

    I love the series and this movie. Would love to see the extended version Dan Curtis made before the studio demanded the cuts.

  • Jun 09, 2013

    After viewing the disappointing Tim Burton "adaptation" of cult soap opera/supernatural drama "Dark Shadows", I felt that, since I'm not willing to watch the original series as a whole, it made sense to watch "House of Dark Shadows," which has the same cast, the (mostly) same storyline, and the same gothic atmosphere. Although "House" isn't great cinema, it's ultimately a stylish, little blackened treat that also has the ability to boast that it's the only film to be adapted from a soap opera. Barnabas Collins (Jonathan Frid) is a vampire that has just awoken from a 150-year long slumber, no thanks to his vamp-phobic father who buried him alive rather than just killing him. Barnabas, as it turns out, was a rather wealthy man before his "demise", and his tomb is placed near his childhood home, the spooky Collinswood mansion. He arrives as a supposed long-lost relative of the Collins family, but there are an awful lot of suspicions surrounding his return. The first to be doubtful is young Carolyn (Nancy Barrett), the high-minded daughter of the family matriarch (Joan Bennett); it doesn't take long before she discovers Barnabas is a vampire, he kills her, and then she's a vampire herself. In the meantime (in soap operas, there always seems to be an "in the meantime), Barnabas is taken by the family governess, Maggie Evans (Kathryn Leigh Scott), who is a dead ringer for his long lost love, Josette. Barnabas yearns for a life with Maggie, and strikes up a deal with the family doctor, Julia Hoffmon (Grayson Hall) so that she can help him achieve mortality. But things don't go as planned ... "House of Dark Shadows" right off the bat feels a bit uneven. Filmed when "Dark Shadows" was in its fourth year, it moves along as though everybody already knows everyone's name, their motives, and their neuroses'. For casual viewers, "House" doesn't work so well, because more often than not the characters feel a bit shallowly written and the film as a whole just feels like three episodes of "Dark Shadows" stitched together. With these flaws aside, there are two redeeming qualities in the film, which are Frid, and well, the gothic atmosphere. Frid himself has always been legendary, thanks to his portrayal as Barnabas, and this film is no exception. He isn't as pale as a vampire should be (whether or not that's on purpose, I don't know) and he doesn't have the looks that any vampires in "Twilight" can boast, but he has a sort of "tortured soul" way about him, even though he constantly acts as though he's above everybody else. Most of the characters here are interesting in one way or another, but Barnabas Collins never ceases to be fascinating. The cinematography is beautiful, with nighttime scenes immersed in shadow and suspense, perfect for a supernatural horror film. Collinswood itself is scary no matter what time of the day it is, and the inside is filmed with a dull lifelessness during the day so that the night brings out the real sumptuousness. The scares or "boos!" are heightened when the sheer darkness swirls around the scene like a cape, and it's almost mysterious. But other than that, "House of Dark Shadows" is forgettable. It's entertaining while slightly silly, nostalgic but not dated. However, it's best viewed by fans of the original show.

    After viewing the disappointing Tim Burton "adaptation" of cult soap opera/supernatural drama "Dark Shadows", I felt that, since I'm not willing to watch the original series as a whole, it made sense to watch "House of Dark Shadows," which has the same cast, the (mostly) same storyline, and the same gothic atmosphere. Although "House" isn't great cinema, it's ultimately a stylish, little blackened treat that also has the ability to boast that it's the only film to be adapted from a soap opera. Barnabas Collins (Jonathan Frid) is a vampire that has just awoken from a 150-year long slumber, no thanks to his vamp-phobic father who buried him alive rather than just killing him. Barnabas, as it turns out, was a rather wealthy man before his "demise", and his tomb is placed near his childhood home, the spooky Collinswood mansion. He arrives as a supposed long-lost relative of the Collins family, but there are an awful lot of suspicions surrounding his return. The first to be doubtful is young Carolyn (Nancy Barrett), the high-minded daughter of the family matriarch (Joan Bennett); it doesn't take long before she discovers Barnabas is a vampire, he kills her, and then she's a vampire herself. In the meantime (in soap operas, there always seems to be an "in the meantime), Barnabas is taken by the family governess, Maggie Evans (Kathryn Leigh Scott), who is a dead ringer for his long lost love, Josette. Barnabas yearns for a life with Maggie, and strikes up a deal with the family doctor, Julia Hoffmon (Grayson Hall) so that she can help him achieve mortality. But things don't go as planned ... "House of Dark Shadows" right off the bat feels a bit uneven. Filmed when "Dark Shadows" was in its fourth year, it moves along as though everybody already knows everyone's name, their motives, and their neuroses'. For casual viewers, "House" doesn't work so well, because more often than not the characters feel a bit shallowly written and the film as a whole just feels like three episodes of "Dark Shadows" stitched together. With these flaws aside, there are two redeeming qualities in the film, which are Frid, and well, the gothic atmosphere. Frid himself has always been legendary, thanks to his portrayal as Barnabas, and this film is no exception. He isn't as pale as a vampire should be (whether or not that's on purpose, I don't know) and he doesn't have the looks that any vampires in "Twilight" can boast, but he has a sort of "tortured soul" way about him, even though he constantly acts as though he's above everybody else. Most of the characters here are interesting in one way or another, but Barnabas Collins never ceases to be fascinating. The cinematography is beautiful, with nighttime scenes immersed in shadow and suspense, perfect for a supernatural horror film. Collinswood itself is scary no matter what time of the day it is, and the inside is filmed with a dull lifelessness during the day so that the night brings out the real sumptuousness. The scares or "boos!" are heightened when the sheer darkness swirls around the scene like a cape, and it's almost mysterious. But other than that, "House of Dark Shadows" is forgettable. It's entertaining while slightly silly, nostalgic but not dated. However, it's best viewed by fans of the original show.