House of Whipcord (Photographer's Models) Reviews

  • Jan 18, 2019

    Disgustingly terrible, but...

    Disgustingly terrible, but...

  • Jul 20, 2018

    this is my favorite pete walker movie, its a paranoid film about a private prison run by psychopaths... there is no escape!

    this is my favorite pete walker movie, its a paranoid film about a private prison run by psychopaths... there is no escape!

  • Oct 27, 2015

    An effective British horror film. It contains echos of Pasolini's Salo in its shocking imagery and depection of a far right regime. By way of the moral 'justice' carried out of the establishment in question the film actually says a lot about general decency and is indeed greater than it seems to get credit for.

    An effective British horror film. It contains echos of Pasolini's Salo in its shocking imagery and depection of a far right regime. By way of the moral 'justice' carried out of the establishment in question the film actually says a lot about general decency and is indeed greater than it seems to get credit for.

  • Mar 21, 2015

    Another 1970s exploitation film from genre master Pete Walker. In this film yet more elements of society and positions of high authority (at the time) are questionned. Here the British justice system, the right wing views of some mainly Conservative politicians to 'throw away the key' a retired judge and sadistic wardons are used. The pretext this time is some private female correctional facility not controlled by the state, its laws and rules. The film is very darkly shot at times which judging by the subject matter can be understood I suppose. The cast includes Pete Walker veteran Sheila Keith (now deceased) and a young Celia Imrie. The sadistic 'wardon' played by Barbara Markham was meant as a parody of TV clean up champion (and nuisance in many respects!) Mary Whitehouse. The director/producer sticking his fingers up at the establishment again. Because these films are some forty years old many of the cast and members of the establishment mentioned are now deceased. I wouldn't rate it as highly as another Pete Walker film of the period Frightmare that I reviewed yesterday but this is still essential film for any discerning film watcher.

    Another 1970s exploitation film from genre master Pete Walker. In this film yet more elements of society and positions of high authority (at the time) are questionned. Here the British justice system, the right wing views of some mainly Conservative politicians to 'throw away the key' a retired judge and sadistic wardons are used. The pretext this time is some private female correctional facility not controlled by the state, its laws and rules. The film is very darkly shot at times which judging by the subject matter can be understood I suppose. The cast includes Pete Walker veteran Sheila Keith (now deceased) and a young Celia Imrie. The sadistic 'wardon' played by Barbara Markham was meant as a parody of TV clean up champion (and nuisance in many respects!) Mary Whitehouse. The director/producer sticking his fingers up at the establishment again. Because these films are some forty years old many of the cast and members of the establishment mentioned are now deceased. I wouldn't rate it as highly as another Pete Walker film of the period Frightmare that I reviewed yesterday but this is still essential film for any discerning film watcher.

  • Mar 18, 2014

    Not a bad little 70's British thriller.

    Not a bad little 70's British thriller.

  • Avatar
    Cameron S Super Reviewer
    Dec 09, 2013

    Opening with the words "This film is dedicated to those who are disturbed by today's lax moral codes and who eagerly await the return of corporal and capital punishment", it would be easy to assume that Pete Walker's 'House of Whipcord' is another example of the morally astray British sexploitation of the 70s, such an assumption, however, would be wrong. What is presented here isn't another entry in the typically formulaic 'women in prison' sub-genre, but instead a politically back dropped criticism of punishment via pain. We follow Anne-Marie (Penny Irving), a French model who falls in love with a mysterious man called (wait for it) Mark E. Desade and agrees one weekend to meet his mother. Upon arrival it becomes apparent to Anne-Marie that this isn't a regular visit, and soon she finds herself captured in the only prison left that utilises capital punishment. It's needless to say that this film is grim, lacking the sense of good time excitement that usually accompanies films in the exploitation genre, and replacing it with a grim world full of sour-faced prison wardens and obnoxiously unlikable characters. Walker paints a dark picture both hypothetically and literally (annoyingly some shots are so dark you can't tell what is happening), and builds a bleak atmosphere impressively, relying on the film's overarching tone rather then visual thrills. Where the film falls apart is in its plot, which is tedious in places and descends into an extravaganza of continuity and plot issues the longer it goes on. Also on the downside is the presented acting, which ranges from absolutely awful to pretty bad. Despite its problem though 'House of Whipcord' somehow remains watchable for the extent of its runtime.

    Opening with the words "This film is dedicated to those who are disturbed by today's lax moral codes and who eagerly await the return of corporal and capital punishment", it would be easy to assume that Pete Walker's 'House of Whipcord' is another example of the morally astray British sexploitation of the 70s, such an assumption, however, would be wrong. What is presented here isn't another entry in the typically formulaic 'women in prison' sub-genre, but instead a politically back dropped criticism of punishment via pain. We follow Anne-Marie (Penny Irving), a French model who falls in love with a mysterious man called (wait for it) Mark E. Desade and agrees one weekend to meet his mother. Upon arrival it becomes apparent to Anne-Marie that this isn't a regular visit, and soon she finds herself captured in the only prison left that utilises capital punishment. It's needless to say that this film is grim, lacking the sense of good time excitement that usually accompanies films in the exploitation genre, and replacing it with a grim world full of sour-faced prison wardens and obnoxiously unlikable characters. Walker paints a dark picture both hypothetically and literally (annoyingly some shots are so dark you can't tell what is happening), and builds a bleak atmosphere impressively, relying on the film's overarching tone rather then visual thrills. Where the film falls apart is in its plot, which is tedious in places and descends into an extravaganza of continuity and plot issues the longer it goes on. Also on the downside is the presented acting, which ranges from absolutely awful to pretty bad. Despite its problem though 'House of Whipcord' somehow remains watchable for the extent of its runtime.

  • Dec 01, 2013

    This was better than I expected.

    This was better than I expected.

  • Nov 21, 2013

    Chilling British horror which is a take on sadistic vigilantism.

    Chilling British horror which is a take on sadistic vigilantism.

  • Sep 29, 2013

    not a bad film considering its age.

    not a bad film considering its age.

  • Jun 10, 2013

    Instructions are meant to be obeyed A matron and an old judge maintain an ex-prison on a hill that they call a clinic. They obtain beautiful young women and try to cleanse them of their sins by brutally torturing them. One young lady they take in tries to fight the system unsuccessfully. Fortunately, she is followed by a friend that will try to rescue her. Can the friend bring down this house of pain or will she become its next victim? "I don't understand." "You're not in this room to understand." Peter Walker, director of House of the Long Shadows, Cover Up, The Confessional, The Flesh and Blood Show, School for Sex, and The Big Switch, delivers House of Whipcord. The storyline for this picture is fairly mediocre and predictable...even the violent scenes were not that good. The acting was fairly good and the cast includes Barbara Markham, Patrick Barr, Ray Brooks, and Dorothy Gordon. "I will not be dismissed." I added this movie to my "to see" list some years back, shortly after joining Rottentomatoes, based on my love affair for grindhouse pictures. I found this on Netflix and had to finally sit down and watch it. I can tell you this was not as good as most jailhouse grindhouse pictures. The action scenes were a bit stale and the drama was lacking. I recommend skipping this film. "You are here to serve sentence." Grade: C-

    Instructions are meant to be obeyed A matron and an old judge maintain an ex-prison on a hill that they call a clinic. They obtain beautiful young women and try to cleanse them of their sins by brutally torturing them. One young lady they take in tries to fight the system unsuccessfully. Fortunately, she is followed by a friend that will try to rescue her. Can the friend bring down this house of pain or will she become its next victim? "I don't understand." "You're not in this room to understand." Peter Walker, director of House of the Long Shadows, Cover Up, The Confessional, The Flesh and Blood Show, School for Sex, and The Big Switch, delivers House of Whipcord. The storyline for this picture is fairly mediocre and predictable...even the violent scenes were not that good. The acting was fairly good and the cast includes Barbara Markham, Patrick Barr, Ray Brooks, and Dorothy Gordon. "I will not be dismissed." I added this movie to my "to see" list some years back, shortly after joining Rottentomatoes, based on my love affair for grindhouse pictures. I found this on Netflix and had to finally sit down and watch it. I can tell you this was not as good as most jailhouse grindhouse pictures. The action scenes were a bit stale and the drama was lacking. I recommend skipping this film. "You are here to serve sentence." Grade: C-