Ill Manors (2012)

TOMATOMETER

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

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Movie Info

A unique crime thriller set on the unforgiving streets of London, iLL MANORS follows six disparate lives, all struggling to survive the circles of violence that engulf them. There is ex-dealer Kirby, who has just been released from prison, thug Ed who will stop at nothing to find his missing phone, troubled Michelle who is just looking for her next hit, young Jake who finds himself drawn to the local gang, Chris, who seeks revenge, Katya, who is desperately trying to escape this foreign land, and Aaron, our main protagonist who is just trying to do the right thing.
Rating:
NR
Genre:
Drama
Directed By:
Written By:
Runtime:
Studio:

Cast

Riz Ahmed
as Aaron
Lee Allen
as Chris
Nick Sagar
as Marcel
Anouska Mond
as Michelle
Mem Ferda
as Vladimir
Sean Sagar
as Freddie
Martin Serene
as Wild Bill
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Critic Reviews for Ill Manors

All Critics (28) | Top Critics (3)

The ambitious Ill Manors lacks a bit in the charisma and entertainment departments, but makes up for it with a grimy intensity.

Full Review… | June 20, 2013
Globe and Mail
Top Critic

This is an impressively mature and technically assured work.

Full Review… | June 10, 2012
Hollywood Reporter
Top Critic

There are plenty of flaws here, but instinctively 'Ill Manors' feels important - like some British films of the 1980s ('Meantime', 'Scum') that spoke of a generation out of work and out of hope.

Full Review… | May 30, 2012
Time Out
Top Critic

Ill Manors flip-flops between its various threads so swiftly that no in-depth characterizations emerge; rather, the film offers only the same old indistinguishable hoods and hookers.

Full Review… | November 25, 2013
The Dissolve

It's about as flattering to London as 'City of God' was to Brazil.

Full Review… | May 2, 2013
Flicks.co.nz

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | June 14, 2012
Daily Telegraph (UK)

Audience Reviews for Ill Manors

A few flaws, but on the whole it's definitely worth a watch. Great story telling and a thrilling narrative. The acting is pretty good, except Skrein was only a caricature of a thug.

Mad Martigan
Mad Martigan

"Ill Manors" is the directorial debut for Britain's Ben Drew, also known as Plan B, the musician. Drew has a bright future ahead of him, I don't think anyone questions that. There are some flashes of good film making and story telling, and really a fine effort for his debut. Unfortunately, the stories being told need more variety, instead of hammering home one singular message. Each character in the film (four drug dealers, one user, and two prostitutes), is an unfortunate product of circumstance seeking escape. Drew goes for what he knows best and sets his movie in his own manor of Forest Gate in London's East End. Small time dealers Ed and Aaron, hold the multi-layered narrative and ensemble cast together by searching for Ed's stolen mobile. This plot device drives the childhood friends into dubious encounters with street people of Britain. A fragmented tale, weaving together a bleak picture of violence, crime, prostitution. This is social commentary by numbers, a gang initiation here, a heroin addict there, everyone is angry and pissed off, victims of abuse. Not to make light of the subject, but we've seen it all before in a number of films, and that is all--and the only thing we see in this film. Drew does a fine job weaving together a series of narratives involving these people, and their stories; ranging from illegal immigrants forced into prostitution, drug addiction, and gang land violence. He effectively portrays how each character is affected by their environment, and how the decisions they make have ripple effects impacting others. Drew displays some nifty camera work --split screens, time-lapse, and flashy editing. An unique addition to the film is the musical score that provides a back-drop to the saga, intertwined into the narrative of the story. Plan B's (Drew) provides his own compositions, in which he raps and sings over parts of the on-screen drama. Each individual song on the soundtrack refers to a specific sequence or character in the film, displaying Drew's raw talent and well-rounded abilities. Cinematography and Production design are first-rate, but the story is mediocre and the perpetual misery never lets up and leaves the screenplay exceedingly overbearing. Ben Drew's cameo is in the final scene as the cab driver. For additional reviews visit http://www.rottentomatoes.com/member/Nesbitt10

Robyn Nesbitt
Robyn Nesbitt

"Ill Manors" is the directorial debut for Britain's Ben Drew, also known as Plan B, the musician. Drew has a bright future ahead of him, I don't think anyone questions that. There are some flashes of good film making and story telling, and really a fine effort for his debut. Unfortunately, the stories being told need more variety, instead of hammering home one singular message. Each character in the film (four drug dealers, one user, and two prostitutes), is an unfortunate product of circumstance seeking escape. Drew goes for what he knows best and sets his movie in his own manor of Forest Gate in London's East End. Small time dealers Ed and Aaron, hold the multi-layered narrative and ensemble cast together by searching for Ed's stolen mobile. This plot device drives the childhood friends into dubious encounters with street people of Britain. A fragmented tale, weaving together a bleak picture of violence, crime, prostitution. This is social commentary by numbers, a gang initiation here, a heroin addict there, everyone is angry and pissed off, victims of abuse. Not to make light of the subject, but we've seen it all before in a number of films, and that is all--and the only thing we see in this film. Drew does a fine job weaving together a series of narratives involving these people, and their stories; ranging from illegal immigrants forced into prostitution, drug addiction, and gang land violence. He effectively portrays how each character is affected by their environment, and how the decisions they make have ripple effects impacting others. Drew displays some nifty camera work --split screens, time-lapse, and flashy editing. An unique addition to the film is the musical score that provides a back-drop to the saga, intertwined into the narrative of the story. Plan B's (Drew) provides his own compositions, in which he raps and sings over parts of the on-screen drama. Each individual song on the soundtrack refers to a specific sequence or character in the film, displaying Drew's raw talent and well-rounded abilities. Cinematography and Production design are first-rate, but the story is mediocre and the perpetual misery never lets up and leaves the screenplay exceedingly overbearing. Ben Drew's cameo is in the final scene as the cab driver. For additional reviews visit http://www.rottentomatoes.com/member/Nesbitt10

Robyn Nesbitt
Robyn Nesbitt

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