Imaginary Heroes - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Imaginary Heroes Reviews

Top Critic
Liam Lacey
Globe and Mail
March 18, 2005
Although she comes across as bordering on insufferable, we are expected to understand that Sandy is the touchstone of honesty in the film because, like other American films of the Sundance variety, eccentricity signifies emotional authenticity.
| Original Score: 2/4
Top Critic
Geoff Pevere
Toronto Star
March 18, 2005
Weaver pretty much keeps Imaginary Heroes aloft.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
Top Critic
Roger Moore
Orlando Sentinel
March 11, 2005
Failed ambition is still ambition. Imaginary Heroes may overreach, but it challenges us as it does. That's heroic in any filmmaker.
| Original Score: 3/5
Top Critic
Ann Hornaday
Washington Post
March 11, 2005
An ambitious, uneven directorial debut.
Top Critic
Desson Thomson
Washington Post
March 11, 2005
Conversations, by the way, need to be laconic, cynical and postmodern. Tears take their time, if they come at all.
Top Critic
Peter Debruge
Miami Herald
March 4, 2005
Imaginary Heroes may not show the directorial confidence of Zach Braff's remarkable Garden State or the emotional depth of A Home at the End of the World, but it's a strong character-driven story all the same.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
Top Critic
Tom Long
Detroit News
March 4, 2005
Writer-director Dan Harris piles so many problems on top of a suburban family here that eventually both problems and characters lose impact and believability.
| Original Score: C
Top Critic
John Monaghan
Detroit Free Press
March 4, 2005
Imaginary Heroes mines the suburban tragedy of Ordinary People, The Ice Storm and American Beauty, but with only a quarter of the insight.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
Top Critic
Carrie Rickey
Philadelphia Inquirer
March 3, 2005
The gift of Imaginary Heroes is getting to know these anything- but-ordinary people.
| Original Score: 2.5/4
Top Critic
Moira MacDonald
Seattle Times
February 25, 2005
Enlivened by some good performances, but it's ultimately overfamiliar and slow, and its characters feel like they were dreamed up by a screenwriter -- no one ever seems to breathe real air.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
Top Critic
Mick LaSalle
San Francisco Chronicle
February 25, 2005
What saves Imaginary Heroes is its essential truthfulness about families, which it reveals, not only in the broad movements of its story but in the small details.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Top Critic
Bruce Westbrook
Houston Chronicle
February 25, 2005
A depressing yarn.
| Original Score: 1.5/4
Top Critic
Robert Denerstein
Denver Rocky Mountain News
February 25, 2005
Harris has made a movie that's not entirely credible. And at times, it seems as if he's doing emotional heavy lifting for which he hasn't properly trained.
| Original Score: C-
Top Critic
Michael Booth
Denver Post
February 25, 2005
Plays like Ordinary People rewritten by someone too young to imitate that film's powerful complications.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
Top Critic
Roger Ebert
Chicago Sun-Times
February 25, 2005
What remains when the movie is over is the memory of Sandy and Tim talking, and of a mother who loves her son, understands him, and understands herself in a wry but realistic way.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Top Critic
Mario Tarradell
Dallas Morning News
February 24, 2005
The ending leaves unanswered questions, but it offers enough substance to justify the nearly two-hour commitment.
Full Review | Original Score: B-
Top Critic
Jeff Strickler
Minneapolis Star Tribune
February 24, 2005
Yes, it's time for another visit to the suburb of Angst, located outside the metropolis of Dysfunction and just a freeway exit away from the tri-city area of Despair, Despondency and Depression.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
Top Critic
Michael Wilmington
Chicago Tribune
February 24, 2005
Except for Weaver's surprisingly funny, bitter performance as the film's grieving, wise-cracking, pot-smoking mother, I didn't much like Heroes -- or rather, I admired part of it without getting much engaged or moved.
| Original Score: 2.5/4
Top Critic
Ty Burr
Boston Globe
February 20, 2005
Harris directs at a funereal pace that snuffs out his script's own wit, and only Weaver keeps the bitter laughs coming.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
Top Critic
Owen Gleiberman
Entertainment Weekly
February 16, 2005
These are not ordinary people. Or real ones.
Full Review | Original Score: D-
Top Critic
Richard Roeper
Ebert & Roeper
February 14, 2005
Everybody is so screwed up here that it just becomes relentlessly so.
Top Critic
Rex Reed
New York Observer
February 10, 2005
An honorable and superbly articulated film.
Top Critic
Peter Travers
Rolling Stone
January 27, 2005
What the movie damagingly lacks is a personality of its own.
| Original Score: 2/4
Top Critic
Laura Sinagra
Village Voice
December 18, 2004
The interior lives of Heroes' adults seem like wild guesses.
Top Critic
David Rooney
Variety
December 17, 2004
Despite occasional affecting moments and nuanced performances from Emile Hirsch and Sigourney Weaver, the film sways awkwardly back and forth between prickly humor and pathos, rarely ringing true in either register.
Top Critic
Lisa Rose
Newark Star-Ledger
December 17, 2004
Just an ordinary tale of rich people in crisis.
| Original Score: 2/4
Top Critic
V.A. Musetto
New York Post
December 17, 2004
Follows the formula long ago established for movies of this ilk: the Big Crisis, followed by the Big Revelation, followed by the Big Showdown, followed by the Happy Ending.
| Original Score: 2/4
Top Critic
Jami Bernard
New York Daily News
December 17, 2004
Hirsch is dead-on with his weary deadpan in the face of high school torment, sexual confusion and parental absurdity.
| Original Score: 2.5/4
Top Critic
Jan Stuart
Newsday
December 16, 2004
Family crosscurrents are so rarely explored with any kind of intelligence in commercial American filmmaking, one applauds Harris for going there at all.
| Original Score: 3/4
Top Critic
Ernest Hardy
L.A. Weekly
December 16, 2004
Writer-director Dan Harris attempts a juggling act of tone, style and genre that results in about half a dozen different movies being shuffled across the screen, none of which -- despite fine performances all around -- really works.
Top Critic
Stephen Holden
New York Times
December 16, 2004
Sigourney Weaver creates a portrait of a taut, frustrated suburban mother of three whose complexity transcends the Mom as Devourer stereotypes who have prowled the movies since Mrs. Robinson stirred her first martini.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Top Critic
Kevin Thomas
Los Angeles Times
December 16, 2004
[Harris] knows how to create complex, believable characters and how to inspire his talented actors.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Top Critic
Michael Rechtshaffen
Hollywood Reporter
September 15, 2004
A sharply observed tragicomedy that draws laughter as genuinely as it coaxes tears.