The Importance of Being Earnest - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

The Importance of Being Earnest Reviews

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February 12, 2017
I was brought up on Oscar Wilde and (despite being a fan of the cast) hated this version for many years... always comparing it to the 1952 version. I recently revisited it with my teenage son whilst preparing for a school play and now love it in it's own right.
June 15, 2016
good comedy of mistaken indentities
May 7, 2016
DAMN that movie was boring!!!
February 27, 2016
WOW.....WOW....SUCH AN ENJOYABLE MOVIE 2 WATCH WITH SUCH A FANTASTIC CAST THROUGHOUT THIS MOVIE IT IS SUCH A FANTASTIC MOVIE 2 WATCH WITH SUCH A BRILLIANT CAST THROUGHOUT THIS MOVIE......WARNING THIS MOVIE CONTAINS STROBE LIGHTNING EFFECTS THROUGHOUT SOME SCENES THROUGHOUT THIS MOVIE....... ITS GOT SUCH A FANTASTIC SOUNDTRACK THROUGHOUT THIS MOVIE IT IS SUCH A BRILLIANT MOVIE 2 WATCH WITH A BRILLIANT CAST THROUGHOUT THIS MOVIE........
½ January 12, 2016
A flawed but fun, whimsical and endearing romantic comedy from Oscar Wilde's story.
½ November 19, 2015
I adore this movie. Witty, silly, but well done. Humorous lighthearted fun.
May 13, 2015
2 starts for effort. I couldn't even watch the hole thing.
½ April 12, 2015
This is a film based on the classic novel The Importance of Being Earnest, written by Osacr Wilde. It has been noted as one of the most charming at witty plays written. Many fans of Wilde did not like this film, and those who loved the play had mixed feelings about it. This is my take on the film. "The Importantance of Being Earnest" is directed by Oliver Parker and stars Rupert Everett, Colin Firth, Frances O'Conner, Reese Witherspoon, Judi Dench, and Tom Wilkinson.

The film follows the story of two friends living in England. Jack (Firth) and his friend Algy (Everett) both use different pseudonyms instead of their real names depending on where they are. In the country, Jack is known as Jack, in the town he is known as Earnest. Algy is known as Earnest in the country and Algy in the town. Both men are in love with separate women, and neither ladies know their real names.

This is the second Colin Firth film I'm reviewing this week. Aside from the remarkable cast assembled, Firth and Everett are by far the best parts of this film. Their performances are splendid. Both have fantastic chemistry together on screen. Every scene the two of them share is absolutely perfect. Dame Judi Dench also gives a brilliant performance as Algy's formidable and intimidating aunt. Tom Wilkinson is another brilliant addition to the cast. His role may be small, but he makes the best of it.



This is a fair adaptation of the classic play. Most of the dialogue is very well written-thanks to Wilde-and the characters are charming. As previously stated, Earnest and Algy are the best characters in the movie. All the other characters do seem uninteresting compared to these two. I suppose the question to ask is; does this film do the source material justice? The play is known mostly for its incredible wit and humor. It's a satire of the rich fops of the Victorian age. The film manages to capture the heart of the play in the scenes between Earnest and Algy.

From a technical standpoint, it's very well made movie. The film has very stylish beautiful cinematography, lovely costumes, and an interesting use of visuals. The direction isn't too impressive here. The film seems to be driven solely by the performances and the underlying story of the play.

This is in no way a period piece. One of the greatest flaws of this film are the blatant historical errors. Throughout the film we hear jazz music playing occasionally. This is very nonsensical, seeing as jazz is not that old at all. There was no jazz music in the Victorian era. Jazz first emerged during the early 1910's. The play takes place during the 1850's. I must also mention a specific scene when Gwendolen has her arse tattooed with the name Earnest. This also wasn't a practice during this time. I have witnessed many films such as this where something that should be a period piece gets modernized. It's a horrendous thing to do, especially if it's based on a beloved classic.

"The Importance of Being Earnest" may stray into a cheesy modern style, but it doesn't change the fact that this is a very witty film. The two central characters shine, the production is beautiful, and the comedy is ever present. It's an amusing film that Wilde fans may somewhat enjoy, but won't love to death.
November 23, 2014
I love this movie. It has a ridiculous plot and characters that make you shake your head but it consistently makes you laugh. Great script and solid dialogue. Guilty pleasure movie for me.
August 5, 2014
Judi Dench absolutely makes this film for me; what an actress!
July 11, 2014
Interesting and creative.
July 11, 2014
just a lovely silly period romcom, great for colin firth fans
June 2, 2014
The Importance of Being Earnest is well cast enough to do the vibrance of its source material justice. Colin Firth and Judi Dench in particular give charming performances.
½ May 31, 2014
What can I say? I'm a sucker for farce. The Importance of Being Earnest isn't a particularly great movie, but it is a charming version of a great play. The casting is quite good, as are the sets and the costumes. This should please most Oscar Wilde fans.
April 1, 2014
An efficient adaptation of Oscar Wilde's droll classic, borne up to comedic heaven by its excellent cast and snappy pacing.
February 26, 2014
An all-star cast, and only one player other than Ms. Dench showing any emotion, genuine or otherwise.
February 10, 2014
Featured the essence of the story but the acting of certainly the four protagonists was wooden and dull.
January 12, 2014
Utterly exquisite!! Oscar Wilde in all his English eccentric glory!!
½ November 17, 2013
Clever and hilarious. Great cast!
November 4, 2013
Everett and Firth and so funny together. This movie is a corny and wonderful love story.
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