In the Mood for Love Reviews

  • 5d ago

    In the Mood for Love is one of those rare films that acheives both beautiful style and thought provoking substance at the same time. The only cinematic experience I can compare it to was when I first watched Godard's Breathless. Director Wong Kar Wai succeeds in imparting the romance we see on the screen onto the viewer themselves, so by the end of the film you will be just as in love with the characters as the characters are themselves, but just like the characters you are not sure why or how. If nothing else In the Mood for Love captures the true mystery and ecstasy of falling in love with someone, which makes the ending all the more powerful and heartbreaking.

    In the Mood for Love is one of those rare films that acheives both beautiful style and thought provoking substance at the same time. The only cinematic experience I can compare it to was when I first watched Godard's Breathless. Director Wong Kar Wai succeeds in imparting the romance we see on the screen onto the viewer themselves, so by the end of the film you will be just as in love with the characters as the characters are themselves, but just like the characters you are not sure why or how. If nothing else In the Mood for Love captures the true mystery and ecstasy of falling in love with someone, which makes the ending all the more powerful and heartbreaking.

  • May 28, 2019

    With a captivating cinematography and peaceful background score, the moments that the film seeks for is beautifully natural. In The Mood For Love Kar-Wai Wong's masterpiece is a love story that every filmmaker wishes to embark upon majestically. Personally, I find it not only incredibly difficult to go through but also is left in awe with the structure of the film. Probably, because there isn't any. Dashing across the film, the script tells a story from a third person's perspective. In a sense that the fable is narrated to him or her, as a memory shared in the form of highlights. Now, this sort of writing has always inspired me. Something that you can see majorly in Pawel Pawlikowski's Cold War. Often, while writing such a material, you are under sheer pressure to not boast off about something inessential to the storyline and also not make the events loud enough to give away the trajectory of these characters. Walking that fine line, comes a nuanced vocab, that the writer and director, Kar-Wai Wong is speaking flamboyantly. Not, for a split second does he give away its essence beforehand. And plus, this format of jumping forward with an uneven pace, helps the maker create a jarring impact on you that is soothing despite of the poignancy that it breathes perpetually, there was always very little window for these characters to peek through and almost impossible to go through. As Evan Puschak observed so smartly in one of his sort-of-reviews, the film is majorly shot with a frame within a frame tone, that helps us dive into the "observer" theme instantly. Plus, the enactments of these characters for their supposed situations, is just pure fun where later on, the slow-motion montages nail the final nail in the coffin expressively. It would and should provoke everyone to be In The Mood For Love, since it first and foremost is about the evolution of a friendship; innocent I find this world.

    With a captivating cinematography and peaceful background score, the moments that the film seeks for is beautifully natural. In The Mood For Love Kar-Wai Wong's masterpiece is a love story that every filmmaker wishes to embark upon majestically. Personally, I find it not only incredibly difficult to go through but also is left in awe with the structure of the film. Probably, because there isn't any. Dashing across the film, the script tells a story from a third person's perspective. In a sense that the fable is narrated to him or her, as a memory shared in the form of highlights. Now, this sort of writing has always inspired me. Something that you can see majorly in Pawel Pawlikowski's Cold War. Often, while writing such a material, you are under sheer pressure to not boast off about something inessential to the storyline and also not make the events loud enough to give away the trajectory of these characters. Walking that fine line, comes a nuanced vocab, that the writer and director, Kar-Wai Wong is speaking flamboyantly. Not, for a split second does he give away its essence beforehand. And plus, this format of jumping forward with an uneven pace, helps the maker create a jarring impact on you that is soothing despite of the poignancy that it breathes perpetually, there was always very little window for these characters to peek through and almost impossible to go through. As Evan Puschak observed so smartly in one of his sort-of-reviews, the film is majorly shot with a frame within a frame tone, that helps us dive into the "observer" theme instantly. Plus, the enactments of these characters for their supposed situations, is just pure fun where later on, the slow-motion montages nail the final nail in the coffin expressively. It would and should provoke everyone to be In The Mood For Love, since it first and foremost is about the evolution of a friendship; innocent I find this world.

  • Mar 31, 2019

    "In the mood for love" is as beautiful as it is bittersweet, and rightfully deserves its reputation. Its characters remain human and believable throughout the whole movie, and the story is told between the lines, as Kar-Wai Wong prefers the viewer to focus on the visual experience of the movie. This doesn't mean, however, that "In the mood for love" is full of style, but no substance. The story it is telling is simple, but relatable and thought provoking. The music is played at the right times and is never intrusive, adding to the overall atmosphere of the movie - a foggy and slowed down version of our own world, with a certain feel of drunkness. Much like being in love. Overall, Kar-Wai Wong offers the viewer a masterpiece in visual filmmaking, and a movie that everyone (romance fans or not) should watch.

    "In the mood for love" is as beautiful as it is bittersweet, and rightfully deserves its reputation. Its characters remain human and believable throughout the whole movie, and the story is told between the lines, as Kar-Wai Wong prefers the viewer to focus on the visual experience of the movie. This doesn't mean, however, that "In the mood for love" is full of style, but no substance. The story it is telling is simple, but relatable and thought provoking. The music is played at the right times and is never intrusive, adding to the overall atmosphere of the movie - a foggy and slowed down version of our own world, with a certain feel of drunkness. Much like being in love. Overall, Kar-Wai Wong offers the viewer a masterpiece in visual filmmaking, and a movie that everyone (romance fans or not) should watch.

  • Mar 13, 2019

    In the Mood for Love is a crown achievement of Kar-wai's style and the art-house cinema, as well as Doyle's approach creating a visual experience. It goes without a doubt, this is one of the best films ever produced. Principal photography and editing of the film took a very long time as it is a technically complicated feature-length film. The director just finished editing in the morning before presenting In the Mood for Love at the Cannes festival. But the hard work of all the filming group and actors was worth it. Wong Kar-wai has touched and grasped perfection in his best film In the Mood for Love. This is an absolute sophistication of the camera work, of usage of colours, music, themes, and motifs being employed to create a complicated mood of love, in which 4 people are involved with 2 phantasms out of them. The film encapsulates all the previous aesthetical achievements of Kar-wai as the director who is capable of creating an unmistakably enthralling romantic world inhabited with the oppressed feelings, self-inflicted heartbreaks and the endless need for love. It is also a moment of Doyle's cinematography glory, with all the camera tricks he had developed to shine at their best. Moreover, it is probably the deepest and most sophisticated work of two lead actors whom Kar-wai recasts again here: Maggie Cheung and Tony Leung Chiu-Wai. Just as Days of Being Wild, In the Mood for Love returns as to the favourite place and time of Kar-wai â" Hong Kong of the early 1960s. But now we see Hong Kong in a different light overwhelmed by the brilliance of story and sophistication of exuberant visual style. Wong Kar-wai has found a way to show absolute and breath-taking beauty based on the emotions of Tony Leung and Maggie Cheung on the screen. The vivid colours are stunning, as well as qipao dresses of Mrs. Chan or Su Li-zhen (Maggie Cheung) we observe in abundance. The frequent Kar-wai's collaborator William Chang had done a great job here in make-up and costume design. He co-operates with the director in every feature, but In the Mood for Love is just a marvelous achievement of him.

    In the Mood for Love is a crown achievement of Kar-wai's style and the art-house cinema, as well as Doyle's approach creating a visual experience. It goes without a doubt, this is one of the best films ever produced. Principal photography and editing of the film took a very long time as it is a technically complicated feature-length film. The director just finished editing in the morning before presenting In the Mood for Love at the Cannes festival. But the hard work of all the filming group and actors was worth it. Wong Kar-wai has touched and grasped perfection in his best film In the Mood for Love. This is an absolute sophistication of the camera work, of usage of colours, music, themes, and motifs being employed to create a complicated mood of love, in which 4 people are involved with 2 phantasms out of them. The film encapsulates all the previous aesthetical achievements of Kar-wai as the director who is capable of creating an unmistakably enthralling romantic world inhabited with the oppressed feelings, self-inflicted heartbreaks and the endless need for love. It is also a moment of Doyle's cinematography glory, with all the camera tricks he had developed to shine at their best. Moreover, it is probably the deepest and most sophisticated work of two lead actors whom Kar-wai recasts again here: Maggie Cheung and Tony Leung Chiu-Wai. Just as Days of Being Wild, In the Mood for Love returns as to the favourite place and time of Kar-wai â" Hong Kong of the early 1960s. But now we see Hong Kong in a different light overwhelmed by the brilliance of story and sophistication of exuberant visual style. Wong Kar-wai has found a way to show absolute and breath-taking beauty based on the emotions of Tony Leung and Maggie Cheung on the screen. The vivid colours are stunning, as well as qipao dresses of Mrs. Chan or Su Li-zhen (Maggie Cheung) we observe in abundance. The frequent Kar-wai's collaborator William Chang had done a great job here in make-up and costume design. He co-operates with the director in every feature, but In the Mood for Love is just a marvelous achievement of him.

  • Jan 03, 2019

    Delicately captures the love of two people who can't come together due to their moral boundaries. A very unique camera work and angles make it visual masterpiece.

    Delicately captures the love of two people who can't come together due to their moral boundaries. A very unique camera work and angles make it visual masterpiece.

  • Nov 17, 2018

    Challenging to watch for the short attention span peeps out there as this is nothing but a lot of short scenes stitched together with lots and lots of talking(all in Cantonese as well). It could be more enticing though as it's just about two lonely spouses talking about their daily lives and wondering where their significant others are. Not gonna lie, I did doze off for the second half of this.. woopsie.

    Challenging to watch for the short attention span peeps out there as this is nothing but a lot of short scenes stitched together with lots and lots of talking(all in Cantonese as well). It could be more enticing though as it's just about two lonely spouses talking about their daily lives and wondering where their significant others are. Not gonna lie, I did doze off for the second half of this.. woopsie.

  • Nov 11, 2018

    This film was almost good.

    This film was almost good.

  • Nov 10, 2018

    Thank god I postponed watching this movie until I am in the right..... mood! ???? I always wandered how a WKW film would be, if it was less focused on atmosphere, and more concerned about its narrative. And In the Mood for Love is definitely this movie. The plot of this movie is more cohesive than of the other Wong Kar-wai films. The rest of his films don't have a conventional plot, but rather disjointed beautiful and hypnotic sequences that allow emotions to flow through them. This is not the case here. In the Mood for Love still doesn't have a linear narrative in the traditional way, I mean it's still a WKW film, but the movie has a more contained narrative to say the least. Unfortunately, the movie didn't hit me emotionally as much as it should. Don't get me wrong, I was moved by the movie even more than every WKW I've watched so far, with the exception of Chungking Express. The issues I had with Days of Being Wild and Fallen Angels are what kept me from being fully emotionally engaged, but as for In the Mood for Love, it's the over-control upon the movie's story that deprived me from being entirely connected emotionally. It may sounds strange, but that's what I felt, and in all probability that's what many people also feel if they have been already familiar with Wong Kar-wai style. I don't want to seem as if I'm just creating problems, or make some flaws up out of no where, but I felt that some emotions and feelings passed quickly without hitting me hard. On the other hand, having control on the narrative aspect of the movie, Wong Kar-wai's poetic visual style became more mature. You can easily identify his trademarks, which the movie is full of them; playing with the time, using elliptical editing, and repeating songs, but they are utilized in a more beneficial and purposeful way, hence more delicate and exquisite way. Even the beauty of the cinematography is different from those of Wong Kar-wai's other works. Here the beauty comes from the sumptuous colour palette more than anything else. In the Mood for Love is unquestionably one of the best movies in cinematic history in terms of using colours. The colours here set the mood, and keep enriching it throughout the film's fleeting runtime. However, the characters of this movie along with the performances are the real pleasure I got from. All the subtlety of the characters are brought out by a magnificent cast. Tony Leung Chiu-Wai is quite possibly one of the most talented actors ever. His performance is simply ingenious. Maggie Cheung is equally terrific, if equally, perhaps marginally inferior in comparison Leung, but it's her character that astonished me. Unlike Days of Being Wild's Su Li-Zhen, this character her is jaw-droppingly multi-layered. And the way the brilliant script delves into her is just mind-blowing. Every time Leung's character, Chow, shares the screen with her unravels a new layer in her character, while showcases the talents of the two lead, especially Leung's unique gift. The masterful combination of the ingenious symbolism of Wong Kar-wai, and the movie's sprawling and elaborate narrative is what makes In the Mood for Love stands out, either from Wong Kar-wai's oeuvre, or from the Romance genre. In the Mood for Love is undoubtedly worthy of being hailed as Wong Kar-wai's masterpiece, but Chungking Express is still my favorite among WKW's cinematic gems. (8.5/10)

    Thank god I postponed watching this movie until I am in the right..... mood! ???? I always wandered how a WKW film would be, if it was less focused on atmosphere, and more concerned about its narrative. And In the Mood for Love is definitely this movie. The plot of this movie is more cohesive than of the other Wong Kar-wai films. The rest of his films don't have a conventional plot, but rather disjointed beautiful and hypnotic sequences that allow emotions to flow through them. This is not the case here. In the Mood for Love still doesn't have a linear narrative in the traditional way, I mean it's still a WKW film, but the movie has a more contained narrative to say the least. Unfortunately, the movie didn't hit me emotionally as much as it should. Don't get me wrong, I was moved by the movie even more than every WKW I've watched so far, with the exception of Chungking Express. The issues I had with Days of Being Wild and Fallen Angels are what kept me from being fully emotionally engaged, but as for In the Mood for Love, it's the over-control upon the movie's story that deprived me from being entirely connected emotionally. It may sounds strange, but that's what I felt, and in all probability that's what many people also feel if they have been already familiar with Wong Kar-wai style. I don't want to seem as if I'm just creating problems, or make some flaws up out of no where, but I felt that some emotions and feelings passed quickly without hitting me hard. On the other hand, having control on the narrative aspect of the movie, Wong Kar-wai's poetic visual style became more mature. You can easily identify his trademarks, which the movie is full of them; playing with the time, using elliptical editing, and repeating songs, but they are utilized in a more beneficial and purposeful way, hence more delicate and exquisite way. Even the beauty of the cinematography is different from those of Wong Kar-wai's other works. Here the beauty comes from the sumptuous colour palette more than anything else. In the Mood for Love is unquestionably one of the best movies in cinematic history in terms of using colours. The colours here set the mood, and keep enriching it throughout the film's fleeting runtime. However, the characters of this movie along with the performances are the real pleasure I got from. All the subtlety of the characters are brought out by a magnificent cast. Tony Leung Chiu-Wai is quite possibly one of the most talented actors ever. His performance is simply ingenious. Maggie Cheung is equally terrific, if equally, perhaps marginally inferior in comparison Leung, but it's her character that astonished me. Unlike Days of Being Wild's Su Li-Zhen, this character her is jaw-droppingly multi-layered. And the way the brilliant script delves into her is just mind-blowing. Every time Leung's character, Chow, shares the screen with her unravels a new layer in her character, while showcases the talents of the two lead, especially Leung's unique gift. The masterful combination of the ingenious symbolism of Wong Kar-wai, and the movie's sprawling and elaborate narrative is what makes In the Mood for Love stands out, either from Wong Kar-wai's oeuvre, or from the Romance genre. In the Mood for Love is undoubtedly worthy of being hailed as Wong Kar-wai's masterpiece, but Chungking Express is still my favorite among WKW's cinematic gems. (8.5/10)

  • Nov 06, 2018

    My favorite part was the end credits, probably the most boring movie ever created.

    My favorite part was the end credits, probably the most boring movie ever created.

  • Nov 03, 2018

    Keeps you wanting to watch more . The slow paced and that longing love you want but knows that its impossible to have . Directed so perfectly .

    Keeps you wanting to watch more . The slow paced and that longing love you want but knows that its impossible to have . Directed so perfectly .