Reviews

  • Aug 13, 2018

    "Shadows" is one of the most stunning accurate, evocative and sensual evocations of the horror and mindless hubris of environmental folly yet to reach the minds, the emotions of people so horribly detached from the reality of the confluent emergences of very real actualities. And the Namanga River Lodge really did serve rather nice samosasa before the nasty, nasty events barely hinted at in this typically stereotypical depiction of gender inequality and iniquity did, actually, overwhelm the kitchen staff of both sexes, and hermaphrodites. I should know: I was there.

    "Shadows" is one of the most stunning accurate, evocative and sensual evocations of the horror and mindless hubris of environmental folly yet to reach the minds, the emotions of people so horribly detached from the reality of the confluent emergences of very real actualities. And the Namanga River Lodge really did serve rather nice samosasa before the nasty, nasty events barely hinted at in this typically stereotypical depiction of gender inequality and iniquity did, actually, overwhelm the kitchen staff of both sexes, and hermaphrodites. I should know: I was there.

  • Jul 12, 2014

    A decent horror thriller with great cinematography of Africa and a pretty good soundtrack.

    A decent horror thriller with great cinematography of Africa and a pretty good soundtrack.

  • Oct 09, 2012

    "In The Shadow of Kilimanjaro" has a lot of good things going for it. The story, like every script that is based on true events, has some facts embellished but is convincing and flows well. The basic premise is that in Kenya in 1984, there was this "perfect storm" of events that lead to a terrifying spectacle. A severe drought killed off much of the vegetation and small animals in the country. What it didn't kill were thousands of baboons, which eventually turned into hungry mobs, devouring anything in their path, including humans. The animal training and the shots of wildlife are really amazing, lending a lot of credibility to the story. There are literally hundreds of animals on the screen and you think to yourself that the shots of these apes all running in one direction must have been stock footage or computer effects but no. There was extensive work when the film was made to train all of these animals to perform for some key scenes in the movie that are quite impressive. The film almost plays like a zombie film, with hordes of man-eating creatures who can't be reasoned with just waiting for the time to strike and in that aspect the film can be quite effective. Where it doesn't quite work is that the film doesn't go far enough into the horror genre, with many shots of potentially shocking attacks being abruptly cut. This might have been done for budgetary reasons, but nonetheless they leave you wanting so much more than they deliver. The ending also comes very abruptly and isn't quite as satisfying as it should be. The film is nevertheless quite good and if you're a fan of zombie films, this is one of those stories that didn't want to be a variation on the genre, but ended up being on. If you've ever wanted to see a good animal-based horror story, look no further. (On VHS, October 5, 2012)

    "In The Shadow of Kilimanjaro" has a lot of good things going for it. The story, like every script that is based on true events, has some facts embellished but is convincing and flows well. The basic premise is that in Kenya in 1984, there was this "perfect storm" of events that lead to a terrifying spectacle. A severe drought killed off much of the vegetation and small animals in the country. What it didn't kill were thousands of baboons, which eventually turned into hungry mobs, devouring anything in their path, including humans. The animal training and the shots of wildlife are really amazing, lending a lot of credibility to the story. There are literally hundreds of animals on the screen and you think to yourself that the shots of these apes all running in one direction must have been stock footage or computer effects but no. There was extensive work when the film was made to train all of these animals to perform for some key scenes in the movie that are quite impressive. The film almost plays like a zombie film, with hordes of man-eating creatures who can't be reasoned with just waiting for the time to strike and in that aspect the film can be quite effective. Where it doesn't quite work is that the film doesn't go far enough into the horror genre, with many shots of potentially shocking attacks being abruptly cut. This might have been done for budgetary reasons, but nonetheless they leave you wanting so much more than they deliver. The ending also comes very abruptly and isn't quite as satisfying as it should be. The film is nevertheless quite good and if you're a fan of zombie films, this is one of those stories that didn't want to be a variation on the genre, but ended up being on. If you've ever wanted to see a good animal-based horror story, look no further. (On VHS, October 5, 2012)