Infernal Affairs III (Mou gaan dou III: Jung gik mou gaan) - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Infernal Affairs III (Mou gaan dou III: Jung gik mou gaan) Reviews

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September 13, 2011
The first movie was great, second was OK, and so is this. (The Departed was fantastic, even better than the original - yeah, I know, very untrendy to rate a Hollywood remake better than the non-Hollywood original).

Interesting enough, but seems to go over a lot of old ground, covered in the first movie. Gets quite convoluted, and loses focus, after a point too.
August 20, 2011
The final chapter of an adrenaline rush thriller trilogy, it tighten up all the loose ends. Finishing of an epic...
½ August 15, 2011
If you loved the first two 'Internal Affairs' movie, then you'll probably find it easy to also enjoy this concluding part: if not, you may find it more difficult. Part one was a tense thriller; part two, more epic in tone, a prequel that filled in the back story, concentrating on some of the secondary characters from the first movie. But it's not completely clear where there's any plot left to fill a third part. What this movie does is overlay the previous stories with an additional layer of romanticism and complexity; but there's a certain lack of focus to the plot, with almost all of our favourite characters already dead by the end of the second film (although, in flashback, there's a rebirth for the great Tony Leung, absent from part two). Indeed, the film works almost entirely by encouraging us to feel differently about scenes we have already witnessed. I still liked this third story about the quiet men of violence, and it did succeed in feeling like something more than just a repeat of the earlier movies. But it's not so clear how much it adds to them.
½ August 15, 2011
If you loved the first two 'Internal Affairs' movie, then you'll probably find it easy to also enjoy this concluding part: if not, you may find it more difficult. Part one was a tense thriller; part two, more epic in tone, a prequel that filled in the back story, concentrating on some of the secondary characters from the first movie. But it's not completely clear where there's any plot left to fill a third part. What this movie does is overlay the previous stories with an additional layer of romanticism and complexity; but there's a certain lack of focus to the plot, with almost all of our favourite characters already dead by the end of the second film (although, in flashback, there's a rebirth for the great Tony Leung, absent from part two). Indeed, the film works almost entirely by encouraging us to feel differently about scenes we have already witnessed. I still liked this third story about the quiet men of violence, and it did succeed in feeling like something more than just a repeat of the earlier movies. But it's not so clear how much it adds to them.
July 23, 2011
Feltl ike it was a sequel just to milk the cash cow
½ July 23, 2011
Not as good as the first two films.
June 30, 2011
Okay. Stop watching the departed, which is overrated anyway. This is the source material, and it batters it.
½ May 13, 2011
A fitting end to a fine trilogy
½ April 28, 2011
It's not bad, but it shouldn't be a sequel, because it's just too different to do a proper follow-up. Probably a story broken out of the series and developed by itself independently would've come out better.
½ April 23, 2011
Leung and Lau are back in this final film of the series to the sequel from the original with heaps of flashbacks. The directors continues the flow of suspense with entertainment. Good to see most of the cast back but I understand why they cannot share the screen together.
Super Reviewer
April 5, 2011
They couldn't take the story any further forward and they couldn't go any further back...sooo, they decide to bodge together a film from a load of deleted scenes. A big boring mess, and an insult to the brilliance of the original.
½ March 11, 2011
Une superbe fin pour la trilogie. Un plongeon dans les noirceurs de l'√Ęme, rong√ (C)e par la suspicion et les regrets.
½ February 15, 2011
Not bad, but it's certainly not as good as the other two films. To be honest, it's been a while since I last saw the other two films, so jumping into this film, I was pretty confused by the first half hour or so because I couldn't remember characters names and the story was constantly jumping back in forth. In fact, there were a ton of moments throughout the film when it would say "1 month later", "10 months later", "7 months earlier", etc. Luckily, as it went along it got easier to figure out. However, compared to the other two films, this didn't have any really big thrills or gun fights or aciton scenes, much of it is talking. They probably could have called this "Infernal Affairs III: Before and After" because the whole film was either telling what happened before or after the other films.
Despite the criticism, it was a good movie. All the acting was great, I probably could have done without some of the of the scenes with the Doctor and Yan, but I didn't really mind so much. It had a nice score and the ending was actually very good (especially the connection to the earlier film with the song). I think I would have appreciated this more if I watched a marathon of the three films.
February 6, 2011
Terrible mess.

Kokoelma Diilimäistä toimistossa hengailua. Tyypit vain istuvat (joskus myös seisovat!) puvut ja selät suorassa, virtaviivaisissa ja tylsän näköisessä toimistossaan ja puhuvat. Puhuvat ja puhuvat. Mitään muuta ei tapahdu. Rollaripaidat ja liike vain puuttuu, muuten oltaisiin Dressmann-mainoksessa.
January 29, 2011
like part 1 and 2..part 3 goes haywire
January 6, 2011
Probably the best one.
Super Reviewer
½ November 26, 2010
Where Scorsese's recent version of Infernal Affairs all the loose ends pretty much got tied up during the film whereas with the original we were left with an open (but much more emotionally impacting) conclusion. The first sequel was a prequel so part III was left to pick up afterwards while also going back over the original film and filling in more detail. In doing this it marks itself out as one that is aimed at the fans rather than being just out for money. The downside of this is of course that if you are not a fan you might find this hard to follow along with (and if you have not seen the first film then just forget it totally). Personally I thought the first film was an enjoyable cop thriller but I didn't think it was brilliant or developed characters that well but the tension was great. With the third film the focus was very much on the characters rather than the tension - with the fate of Ming being the modern thread that holds the film together.

If you are into the characters and the parallels with the original film then it is worth seeing because it does do it pretty well. It does ask you to pay attention but it rewards you if you do and have been. There is action but mostly it is the Ming's ongoing struggle with who he is that the film pays most attention to. I quite liked this but must confess that this film still didn't do a great job of bringing out the characters that well and it is more the events and revelations that kept me interested rather than an emotional buy-in with the characters. Lau is perhaps partly to blame for this because I thought he was buttoned a bit too tight - it was understandable in some regards but the third film should have been the point where he shows more of a breakdown (which he does, but again it is events rather than emotion). Leung is good again but his scenes don't seem as relevant or as interesting within this film - again it is probably to do with the lack of emotional buy-in I felt with his character; his performance is natural and engaging though. Outside of these two the rest of the cast are pretty good. Again I didn't think much of the use of Chen but Wong and Tsang are both solid in their small returns.

Overall then an effective and enjoyable film if you love the series and the characters; an interesting one if you have seen the first two films and a pointless one if you are looking to join in at the last minute. Tying up the loose ends of the series, the film isn't tense enough or emotionally impacting enough to be worth a look unless you are really already into the characters but it is an interesting way to bring things to an end - with restraint and tragedy rather than excess.
November 3, 2010
Decided to re-visit this series, starting with the sequel to the original (Infernal Affairs II is a prequel, which I haven't seen yet.). This reconstitutes much of the original cast, despite Tony Leung being dead in the first film, since it flashes back considerably to before his death. Watching this immediately after Scorsese's remake(The Departed) of the first film, it really is driven home how superior these films are. The way we get into the character's heads and their internal conflict is truly superior. In this, Ming, the mole, is left in the police department, with nobody knowing that he was the criminal mole. But the gang and his boss have all been killed or disbanded, so he is essentially stranded in an ethical life, and is clearly finishing what he began in the first film of becoming an actual good cop, not a gangster. Will he succeed?

He is in Internal Affairs, and quickly grows suspicious of a secret division inspector, who he thinks is a crooked cop working for the triads. In a series of flashbacks, to when Tony Cheung was alive, we begin to see as he uncovers and learns of more troubling connections and secret deals that he was not aware of. Does someone else, even in the police, know he was the mole? Ming makes it his solo mission to bring down the corrupt secret inspector, and works around the clock. Riven with guilt about the murder of Tony Cheung and his attempt to be a good cop, he begins losing grip on sanity. With a pretty psychologist who had fallen in love with Tony Cheung before his death, he begins to open up honestly much as Tony Cheung did with her. In a brilliant parallel scene of future and past, the two men side-by-side but split in time reveal to her their true identities under hallucination therapy, and that Ming was reponsible for Tony Cheung's death. The story about his mission against the secret inspector has a twist, but the guts of this movie, like the first one, is all about these characters and their struggles with just who they have become: one playing a criminal loses his grip and doubts whether he is even a cop or a good man anymore, the other as the mole begins to go good and begins turning into a good man. This is the struggle that anchors the films, and sadly what Scorsese did not treat properly (and he killed everyone off!). In these films, the questions linger, and the story continues, even after the twists and bloody conclusions. There are always more loose ends, always more unknown allegiances, always more unknowns about who people truly are.
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