Jafar Panahi's Taxi Reviews

  • Jan 11, 2019

    Showing and telling stories: the essence of cinema, in my opinion. This movie tells you that if you have a great idea and a camera, you can make a great movie, even if there is an entire system against you.

    Showing and telling stories: the essence of cinema, in my opinion. This movie tells you that if you have a great idea and a camera, you can make a great movie, even if there is an entire system against you.

  • Nov 11, 2017

    At the beginning, you thing two contradictory things: 1) the movie is not spontaneous, but prepared, 2) the movie just depends on casual stories and tells nothing specific or important. But at the end, truth or not, it makes a reflection on iranian society.

    At the beginning, you thing two contradictory things: 1) the movie is not spontaneous, but prepared, 2) the movie just depends on casual stories and tells nothing specific or important. But at the end, truth or not, it makes a reflection on iranian society.

  • Aug 24, 2017

    Panahi is another master of Iranian style in using a sequence of everyday objects to convey profound meanings, a skill likely developed in survival of heavy censorship. The ending is a hybrid of magical realism and Blair Witch-style surprise.

    Panahi is another master of Iranian style in using a sequence of everyday objects to convey profound meanings, a skill likely developed in survival of heavy censorship. The ending is a hybrid of magical realism and Blair Witch-style surprise.

  • Mar 30, 2017

    Though it probably shouldn't be taken seriously as a totally real documentary, Jafar Panahi's latest undercover film is poignant, emotionally stirring, and fun to watch.

    Though it probably shouldn't be taken seriously as a totally real documentary, Jafar Panahi's latest undercover film is poignant, emotionally stirring, and fun to watch.

  • Jan 01, 2017

    Jafar Panahi is serving a twenty-year ban from making films in Iran due to his willingness to make films that offend the government. Since the ban was imposed he has creatively continued to make films but without a crew and previously in the safety of his own home (e.g., This is Not a Film, 2011). This time, he has installed cameras in his car and taken on the role of taxi driver to film on the streets of Tehran. Taking his cues from Abbas Kiarostami (who passed away after a botched operation in 2016) who often filmed actors (or non-actors) in cars (e.g., Taste of Cherry, 1997; Ten, 2002), Panahi has filmed himself carting people around and their conversations and experiences make up the content of the film. It is sometimes difficult to know whether the dialogue is scripted or not, and, if scripted, what its inclusion signifies. But it is clear that this is an act of resistance, because the episodes clearly reveal the political intolerance and human rights violations that are present in Iranian society. These problems are made explicit when Panahi's young "niece" (the actors remain anonymous to protect them), under the pretense of a class assignment on film-making, lists all of the content that is forbidden from movies, including any discussion of economic or political problems as well as the inclusion characters with Persian names wearing ties (!!!). Naturally, such a character soon appears! At the end, Panahi films a discussion with a presumed well-known actress or lawyer (hard to say) about the actual violations that the current film represents. An earlier discussion of the death penalty and its imposition for minor crimes now fits into place; let's hope that Panahi's high profile (and the wide circulation of this film) protects him from any further clampdown. We should all be so brave in the case that resistance is necessary even in presumed "free" nations.

    Jafar Panahi is serving a twenty-year ban from making films in Iran due to his willingness to make films that offend the government. Since the ban was imposed he has creatively continued to make films but without a crew and previously in the safety of his own home (e.g., This is Not a Film, 2011). This time, he has installed cameras in his car and taken on the role of taxi driver to film on the streets of Tehran. Taking his cues from Abbas Kiarostami (who passed away after a botched operation in 2016) who often filmed actors (or non-actors) in cars (e.g., Taste of Cherry, 1997; Ten, 2002), Panahi has filmed himself carting people around and their conversations and experiences make up the content of the film. It is sometimes difficult to know whether the dialogue is scripted or not, and, if scripted, what its inclusion signifies. But it is clear that this is an act of resistance, because the episodes clearly reveal the political intolerance and human rights violations that are present in Iranian society. These problems are made explicit when Panahi's young "niece" (the actors remain anonymous to protect them), under the pretense of a class assignment on film-making, lists all of the content that is forbidden from movies, including any discussion of economic or political problems as well as the inclusion characters with Persian names wearing ties (!!!). Naturally, such a character soon appears! At the end, Panahi films a discussion with a presumed well-known actress or lawyer (hard to say) about the actual violations that the current film represents. An earlier discussion of the death penalty and its imposition for minor crimes now fits into place; let's hope that Panahi's high profile (and the wide circulation of this film) protects him from any further clampdown. We should all be so brave in the case that resistance is necessary even in presumed "free" nations.

  • Aug 21, 2016

    Documental en tiempo real en tono intimista- minimalista en el que un taxi sirve de confesionario y foro de critica social. Un ave rara que no hay que perder de vista.

    Documental en tiempo real en tono intimista- minimalista en el que un taxi sirve de confesionario y foro de critica social. Un ave rara que no hay que perder de vista.

  • Aug 07, 2016

    A very interesting movie but sadly, not for me. It is a pretty interesting documentary of a city from the eyes of probably the country's most influential directors so if you are interested in knowing more about the culture, the city and its people, be sure to watch this. Side note: it got me to watch One night in Anatolia which was cool.

    A very interesting movie but sadly, not for me. It is a pretty interesting documentary of a city from the eyes of probably the country's most influential directors so if you are interested in knowing more about the culture, the city and its people, be sure to watch this. Side note: it got me to watch One night in Anatolia which was cool.

  • Jul 05, 2016

    It is quite magical when a form of cultural representation not only shatters preconceptions of a particular place and people but also reaches out with a sincere and warmhearted greeting. Panahi's Taxi does this and also proves to be an outstanding accomplishment for cinema, defying all kinds of restrictions in order to fulfill its goal of being seen.

    It is quite magical when a form of cultural representation not only shatters preconceptions of a particular place and people but also reaches out with a sincere and warmhearted greeting. Panahi's Taxi does this and also proves to be an outstanding accomplishment for cinema, defying all kinds of restrictions in order to fulfill its goal of being seen.

  • Jun 25, 2016

    A little heavy handed at times - but smart and personable.

    A little heavy handed at times - but smart and personable.

  • Jun 03, 2016

    As director Jafar Panahi is banned from making movies by the Iranian government, he poses as a taxi driver and makes a movie about social challenges in Iran. We are invited to his fares as we meet people heading places. It got a very documentary-like style, but it's clear that actors are rented in here - probably with quite a loose script. Interesting chats and happenings and a very interesting way of movie making. I really like the camera media changes during the film. It's does not feel too long and this sticks with me as a brave film with a fresh perspective. 7.5 out of 10 roses.

    As director Jafar Panahi is banned from making movies by the Iranian government, he poses as a taxi driver and makes a movie about social challenges in Iran. We are invited to his fares as we meet people heading places. It got a very documentary-like style, but it's clear that actors are rented in here - probably with quite a loose script. Interesting chats and happenings and a very interesting way of movie making. I really like the camera media changes during the film. It's does not feel too long and this sticks with me as a brave film with a fresh perspective. 7.5 out of 10 roses.