Jägarna (The Hunters) Reviews

  • Apr 02, 2017

    One of the best swedish thriller movies i've ever seen..!

    One of the best swedish thriller movies i've ever seen..!

  • Feb 22, 2014

    In Sweden we have an abundance of investigative crime-thrillers, but "Jägarna" or "The Hunters" Directed by Kjell Sundvall qualifies as one of the best. Although it was released about one month prior to Fargo you could almost call it the Swedish counterpart. Not that the two stories closely resembles each other when looking at the big picture. The similarities is in terms of tone, basic concept and the way the film makes hilarious fun of locals in a desolate area. After recovering from taking a bullet, in the line of duty as a police officer, Erik played Rolf Lassgård returns from the capital Stockholm to the small desolate Norrland's town where he grew up, located in one of the most northern parts of Sweden and there he attends his fathers funeral. Being shot has prompted Erik to start working as a police officer in Norrland and he moves in with his brother Leif played by Lennart Jähkel, in a house that they both inherit from their father. The first assignment Erik gets is to solve a series of organized deer and Elk poaching cases, but he soon remembers how difficult and unpopular it can be to perform investigations in a town where everyone knows each other, and as the investigation moves forward the poachers gets increasingly pressured which causes the situation to spiral out of control. Director Kjell Sundvall hasn't been at all afraid that his target audience will be turned of by violence, graphic scenes or how honest he is when depicting the amount of racism that runs rampant in some parts of the country. Deer poaching was and still is a large problem in Sweden since a lot of these deers belong to and help make a living for an ethnic minority of natives called Sami people. Adressing a real issue and not being afraid to take it one step further is part of what makes this film better than most other Swedish films in the genre. Rolf Lassgård delivers a good performance as the main protagonist, Erik, but the best performance of the film comes from Lennart Jähkel in the role as Erik's brother, Leif. All smaller performances comes from locals of Norrland so the dialect is always spot on. The only major problem with the film is the main female character, a prosecutor named Anna played by Helena Bergström. The problem has nothing to do with her performance, but with the fact that the character seems to have been squeezed into the story without any purpose, just for the sake of having a female character, apart from that "Jägarna" is a very inventive, violent and capturing crime-thriller.

    In Sweden we have an abundance of investigative crime-thrillers, but "Jägarna" or "The Hunters" Directed by Kjell Sundvall qualifies as one of the best. Although it was released about one month prior to Fargo you could almost call it the Swedish counterpart. Not that the two stories closely resembles each other when looking at the big picture. The similarities is in terms of tone, basic concept and the way the film makes hilarious fun of locals in a desolate area. After recovering from taking a bullet, in the line of duty as a police officer, Erik played Rolf Lassgård returns from the capital Stockholm to the small desolate Norrland's town where he grew up, located in one of the most northern parts of Sweden and there he attends his fathers funeral. Being shot has prompted Erik to start working as a police officer in Norrland and he moves in with his brother Leif played by Lennart Jähkel, in a house that they both inherit from their father. The first assignment Erik gets is to solve a series of organized deer and Elk poaching cases, but he soon remembers how difficult and unpopular it can be to perform investigations in a town where everyone knows each other, and as the investigation moves forward the poachers gets increasingly pressured which causes the situation to spiral out of control. Director Kjell Sundvall hasn't been at all afraid that his target audience will be turned of by violence, graphic scenes or how honest he is when depicting the amount of racism that runs rampant in some parts of the country. Deer poaching was and still is a large problem in Sweden since a lot of these deers belong to and help make a living for an ethnic minority of natives called Sami people. Adressing a real issue and not being afraid to take it one step further is part of what makes this film better than most other Swedish films in the genre. Rolf Lassgård delivers a good performance as the main protagonist, Erik, but the best performance of the film comes from Lennart Jähkel in the role as Erik's brother, Leif. All smaller performances comes from locals of Norrland so the dialect is always spot on. The only major problem with the film is the main female character, a prosecutor named Anna played by Helena Bergström. The problem has nothing to do with her performance, but with the fact that the character seems to have been squeezed into the story without any purpose, just for the sake of having a female character, apart from that "Jägarna" is a very inventive, violent and capturing crime-thriller.

  • Jul 21, 2012

    Petite virà (C)e chez les rednecks Suà (C)dois (je prà (C)fère à la tà (C)là (C) que dans la vraie vie)

    Petite virà (C)e chez les rednecks Suà (C)dois (je prà (C)fère à la tà (C)là (C) que dans la vraie vie)

  • Jan 01, 2012

    A good Thriller centering on a hunting environment in northern Sweden.

    A good Thriller centering on a hunting environment in northern Sweden.

  • Oct 06, 2011

    Rednecks in northern Sweden...need I say more? A classic. Highly recommended!

    Rednecks in northern Sweden...need I say more? A classic. Highly recommended!

  • Jan 24, 2011

    Kyllä ne osaa tuolla naapurissa tehdä leffoja. Tästäki on aikaa yli 10vuotta ku tämän näki..

    Kyllä ne osaa tuolla naapurissa tehdä leffoja. Tästäki on aikaa yli 10vuotta ku tämän näki..

  • Aug 06, 2010

    A creepy tens thriller set in the north of Sweden. It is not a sympathetic in it's description of the people from there. It is well acted and depicts how many of those rural communities are like filled with racist, moonshine-drinking rednecks. The film is exciting and has a lot of suspense. It is very believable and uncomfortably so. Highly recommended!

    A creepy tens thriller set in the north of Sweden. It is not a sympathetic in it's description of the people from there. It is well acted and depicts how many of those rural communities are like filled with racist, moonshine-drinking rednecks. The film is exciting and has a lot of suspense. It is very believable and uncomfortably so. Highly recommended!

  • Martin D Super Reviewer
    Apr 12, 2010

    Kjell Sundvall classic macho thriller is as high testosterone values ??that it is laughable ståfräs for nearly two hours. But behind the rather stale women's views and idiot simple plot is an interesting depiction of the Swedish male role and cruelly beautiful natural images that still holds true. Swedish action movies were made before 1996, depictions of the northern parts of our country as well. But by River villager Kjell Sundvall in a very artfully and effectively connecting all parts of Norrland Prejudice with pork action scenes taken from Hollywood, so created a new genre in Swedish film. Actually it should not have worked. Looking at the film today, this seems almost like a parody cocktail where you mix equal parts down "Die Hard" with northern gold advertisement and "Slope Guard". For the rest involved Lennart Jähkel, Guldbagge rewarded for best supporting actor, in both. But what makes Sundsvall thriller actually stands up surprisingly well today as 15 years ago is less about originality and more pure history. For as I said, we have not seen anything like "hunters" since that is not the point, but the story itself over time with more qualities than at the premiere. The story you may already by now. A robust Rolf Lassgård play the classic police Eric coming back to the village, which is actually called just The village, in Norrbotten. There he meets his brother (Jähkel) and begins to unravel the nasty cases involving brutal poaching. But there is at least as much drama in the personal relationship that Erik voluntarily or involuntarily put in. Firstly, the film is still one of the most beautiful depictions of the northern regions of Sweden. Sundvall uses exquisite image compositions to show the fantastic nature and Björn J: son Lindh sensitive music frames perfectly listings. The film should really be seen at the cinema where the screen is spreading far around the audience to achieve maximum effect. With regard to the portrayal of characters in the film is an entirely different story. It's hard to really criticize Sundvall for the most exaggerated portraits, he is himself a proud north bottoming, but it's always dangerous when parody as super macho men in the cozy accent stands and threaten each other to life every five minutes. The worst it will be for Jarmo Mäkinen who, with their distinct Finland-Swedish hardly increases respect for our neighbors to the east. It also becomes more than a little too obvious that these hard men are really little boys who hide behind peer pressure, fear of softness or tough childhood. It is psychology that comes from refrigerator poetry and almost more fond degrading than realistic narrative. The only two characters that actually resembles real people are just brothers Eric and Leif, radiant shaped by Lassgård and Jähkel. The interaction between them feels completely authentic and both can arrest points in his characters that rings more than credible; Lassgård sense of responsibility and uncomfortable to be the returning hero and Jähkel tender portrait of a wounded soul behind a face of steel. But if the men are cut, shaped, it's nothing against the women. Firstly, they are virtually invisible. Those that stand out are Editha Domingo as the ever-degrading waitress Nena and Helena Bergström as the ever-angry prosecutor who shows up to help Eric. Though the whole point, and what makes the film does not disappear straight down into a hole of stereotyping and prejudice, is precisely that, indirectly, is an interesting portrait of the traditional macho role. It is seldom we see similar films in Sweden, perhaps to equal opportunities here than in many other places, is actually surprisingly strong. Sundvall have probably unwittingly made a film on a very interesting way leads us to question what it really means to be men. He does so not by asking interesting questions about masculinity, but to present such an exaggerated picture that we must ask ourselves what we really like it here. A bit like Michael Haneke makes us question our perceptions of violence by a sadistic way, self-describing it in "Funny Games". With the exception that Haneke himself is on the point. "Hunters" was a long time and time again to be repeated in an American version. It had worked more than well, this thriller has just what it takes to go home in Hollywood. But the portrayal of Norrbotten residents, positive or negative, is typically Swedish, which means that this film is actually a Swedish classic. Whatever one may think about the product.

    Kjell Sundvall classic macho thriller is as high testosterone values ??that it is laughable ståfräs for nearly two hours. But behind the rather stale women's views and idiot simple plot is an interesting depiction of the Swedish male role and cruelly beautiful natural images that still holds true. Swedish action movies were made before 1996, depictions of the northern parts of our country as well. But by River villager Kjell Sundvall in a very artfully and effectively connecting all parts of Norrland Prejudice with pork action scenes taken from Hollywood, so created a new genre in Swedish film. Actually it should not have worked. Looking at the film today, this seems almost like a parody cocktail where you mix equal parts down "Die Hard" with northern gold advertisement and "Slope Guard". For the rest involved Lennart Jähkel, Guldbagge rewarded for best supporting actor, in both. But what makes Sundsvall thriller actually stands up surprisingly well today as 15 years ago is less about originality and more pure history. For as I said, we have not seen anything like "hunters" since that is not the point, but the story itself over time with more qualities than at the premiere. The story you may already by now. A robust Rolf Lassgård play the classic police Eric coming back to the village, which is actually called just The village, in Norrbotten. There he meets his brother (Jähkel) and begins to unravel the nasty cases involving brutal poaching. But there is at least as much drama in the personal relationship that Erik voluntarily or involuntarily put in. Firstly, the film is still one of the most beautiful depictions of the northern regions of Sweden. Sundvall uses exquisite image compositions to show the fantastic nature and Björn J: son Lindh sensitive music frames perfectly listings. The film should really be seen at the cinema where the screen is spreading far around the audience to achieve maximum effect. With regard to the portrayal of characters in the film is an entirely different story. It's hard to really criticize Sundvall for the most exaggerated portraits, he is himself a proud north bottoming, but it's always dangerous when parody as super macho men in the cozy accent stands and threaten each other to life every five minutes. The worst it will be for Jarmo Mäkinen who, with their distinct Finland-Swedish hardly increases respect for our neighbors to the east. It also becomes more than a little too obvious that these hard men are really little boys who hide behind peer pressure, fear of softness or tough childhood. It is psychology that comes from refrigerator poetry and almost more fond degrading than realistic narrative. The only two characters that actually resembles real people are just brothers Eric and Leif, radiant shaped by Lassgård and Jähkel. The interaction between them feels completely authentic and both can arrest points in his characters that rings more than credible; Lassgård sense of responsibility and uncomfortable to be the returning hero and Jähkel tender portrait of a wounded soul behind a face of steel. But if the men are cut, shaped, it's nothing against the women. Firstly, they are virtually invisible. Those that stand out are Editha Domingo as the ever-degrading waitress Nena and Helena Bergström as the ever-angry prosecutor who shows up to help Eric. Though the whole point, and what makes the film does not disappear straight down into a hole of stereotyping and prejudice, is precisely that, indirectly, is an interesting portrait of the traditional macho role. It is seldom we see similar films in Sweden, perhaps to equal opportunities here than in many other places, is actually surprisingly strong. Sundvall have probably unwittingly made a film on a very interesting way leads us to question what it really means to be men. He does so not by asking interesting questions about masculinity, but to present such an exaggerated picture that we must ask ourselves what we really like it here. A bit like Michael Haneke makes us question our perceptions of violence by a sadistic way, self-describing it in "Funny Games". With the exception that Haneke himself is on the point. "Hunters" was a long time and time again to be repeated in an American version. It had worked more than well, this thriller has just what it takes to go home in Hollywood. But the portrayal of Norrbotten residents, positive or negative, is typically Swedish, which means that this film is actually a Swedish classic. Whatever one may think about the product.

  • Jan 11, 2010

    Jævla staselig film om machomenn og jakt på svenske bygda(Nord Sverige).Mye rusk og dysunksjonelle relasjoner her!!!Klasse film!!!

    Jævla staselig film om machomenn og jakt på svenske bygda(Nord Sverige).Mye rusk og dysunksjonelle relasjoner her!!!Klasse film!!!

  • Sep 22, 2009

    Swedish! Great swedish actors. A movie you can watch many times.

    Swedish! Great swedish actors. A movie you can watch many times.