Joan the Maid 1: The Battles (Jeanne la Pucelle I - Les batailles) Reviews

  • Mar 04, 2009

    dreyer's compassionate potrayal of the trial is legendary and bresson's treatment is a bit too dry. rivette's version of jeanne d'arc is equal parts compassionate and historical. bonnaire was excelent too! bring on part deux

    dreyer's compassionate potrayal of the trial is legendary and bresson's treatment is a bit too dry. rivette's version of jeanne d'arc is equal parts compassionate and historical. bonnaire was excelent too! bring on part deux

  • Oct 27, 2007

    I knew nothing of Joan of Arc before watching this, so it was nice to see. Still, it felt like we were just being taken from one "known" part of her legend to the next "known" part with little context. So it's worth watching for that alone--you become familiar with the legend. I have no idea if it is historically accurate.

    I knew nothing of Joan of Arc before watching this, so it was nice to see. Still, it felt like we were just being taken from one "known" part of her legend to the next "known" part with little context. So it's worth watching for that alone--you become familiar with the legend. I have no idea if it is historically accurate.

  • Sep 06, 2007

    Both Bresson and Dreyer magnificently portray Joan d'Arc's faith at its apogee, pushed into the realm of martyrdom, focusing their films on the sombre final trial. But Rivette's treatment of the Joan's well-known struggle to enter into the battles against England serves as the best filmic portrayal of this earlier moment in Joan's life and shows her faith in a very different way. Here, Joan's faith is treated in a lighter fashion; she does not appear to be fighting with the recognition that her life is at stake and nevertheless pursuing her dangerous course, but instead appears naive, overzealous but unblemished, and is almost cute in her absolute uninformed seriousness. Sandrine Bonnaire was perfect for the part of Joan, striking a perfect balance between the simple servant and the glorious saint.

    Both Bresson and Dreyer magnificently portray Joan d'Arc's faith at its apogee, pushed into the realm of martyrdom, focusing their films on the sombre final trial. But Rivette's treatment of the Joan's well-known struggle to enter into the battles against England serves as the best filmic portrayal of this earlier moment in Joan's life and shows her faith in a very different way. Here, Joan's faith is treated in a lighter fashion; she does not appear to be fighting with the recognition that her life is at stake and nevertheless pursuing her dangerous course, but instead appears naive, overzealous but unblemished, and is almost cute in her absolute uninformed seriousness. Sandrine Bonnaire was perfect for the part of Joan, striking a perfect balance between the simple servant and the glorious saint.

  • Nov 17, 2006

    ARGGH.....!!!!! Y ME?

    ARGGH.....!!!!! Y ME?