Jobriath A.D. Reviews

  • Aug 01, 2016

    great footage with the first pop/rock/punk transgender icon Jayne County

    great footage with the first pop/rock/punk transgender icon Jayne County

  • Jul 29, 2012

    This documentary is not getting much attention yet, however you need to take a look. During the 70s the Glam rock period was just starting and was a precursor actually to the 80s, Madonna, Marilyn Manson, and Lady GaGa. This time was a birth to someone whose rock music was layered and classical in many ways. Jobriath became a sensation overnight through hype and crashed after a couple of record albums; he was the first out rock artist in decade when it wasn't cool to be like Boy George. Big guns such as Carly Simon's promoter Jerry Brandt and Elektra records worked hard to get the public to see this musical genius...yet they were not ready. This is Jobriath's journey to the stars and his fall to Earth. I can not recommend this movie enough. If it plays in your area see it. Kieran Turner's direction and structure keeps you interested and show the love that he has put in to make this a compelling story.

    This documentary is not getting much attention yet, however you need to take a look. During the 70s the Glam rock period was just starting and was a precursor actually to the 80s, Madonna, Marilyn Manson, and Lady GaGa. This time was a birth to someone whose rock music was layered and classical in many ways. Jobriath became a sensation overnight through hype and crashed after a couple of record albums; he was the first out rock artist in decade when it wasn't cool to be like Boy George. Big guns such as Carly Simon's promoter Jerry Brandt and Elektra records worked hard to get the public to see this musical genius...yet they were not ready. This is Jobriath's journey to the stars and his fall to Earth. I can not recommend this movie enough. If it plays in your area see it. Kieran Turner's direction and structure keeps you interested and show the love that he has put in to make this a compelling story.

  • Jul 10, 2012

    Originally posted at iheartmoviesto.com Jobriath? The name sounded familiar but I just couldnâ(TM)t place it. It wasnâ(TM)t until after a few YouTube and Google searches that I remembered having listened to one of his songs from my co-workerâ(TM)s iPod. Jobriath was no David Bowie. He wasnâ(TM)t Marc Bolan. He wasnâ(TM)t Brian Eno, either. He was born Bruce Wayne Campell and became more well known than all of them. His manager at the time, Jerry Brandt, spent tens of thousands of dollars promoting an act through billboards and bus posters, interviews and articles before Jobriath had even released a single album. New York City, London and L.A. all knew his name and were expecting something BIG. Kinda like in the Josie and the Pussycats movie when Parker Posey sells the music before there is even music to buy. Jobriath a.k.a. âThe American David Bowieâ?, was the most promoted and hyped-up musician of his time with one major difference; Jobriath was openly gay. Being so open and honest about this sexuality led to his quick and untimely fall from grace. When his self-titled solo album finally got itâ(TM)s release, it was bombarded by homophobic music critics who made sure he fell hard, and it was a commercial flop. He was even rejected by the gay community that was struggling at the time with itâ(TM)s own identity. Leather daddy was acceptable, but glitter wearing rock fairy was not. Jobriath A.D. is a touching and honest documentary on the biggest 70â²s glam rock musician who never was. Well, never fully was. The documentary chronicles this outrageous and talented life, attempting to find out who was the man behind the performance. Jobriath A.D. opens with an animation of the Chelsea Hotel in New York City. Zoom into a bedroom and there we see a man alone, laying in the bed, looking sickly and watching TV. This is Jobriath. Flashback even further and we are brought to a stage production of Hair, where his short yet meaningful stage career is set in motion. Revealing an extremely private person without exploiting him, Jobriath A.D. creates a larger than life narrative with the help of those who were around him, who knew Jobriath as well as he would allow. He took on many names and persona in his career, and we see that change happen overtime in a way that is natural, making nothing in the film seem forced or out of place. The Midnight Special performance of Rock of Ages particularly stands out as a great example of 70â²s glam rock stage presence. The interviews move sympathetically from Jobriathâ(TM)s younger brother, to his outreach worker who was there when Jobriathâ(TM)s life was coming to an end, and to everyone whose life this recluse yet flamboyant performer had touched along the way (even Scissor Sistersâ(TM) Jake Shears comments on Jobriathâ(TM)s important contribution to the musical landscape of today). Director Kieran Turner manages to convey respect and honesty when stringing together the lifetime of an extremely talented and troubled artist. While watching, I immediately thought of another great, but fictional, movie about 70â²s glam rock(Velvet Goldmine) and I think most people will find the comparison easy. But donâ(TM)t let that fool you, even though it may feel familiar in the beginning, it is definitely a film which stands on itâ(TM)s own two feet. However, my only complaint were the animations during the film that seemed gimmicky (and perhaps a nod to Hedwig). But with that being said, the animation sequence made with paper cut-outs was well done and conveyed an appropriate emotion to the audience without slipping down a steep slope that would have totally shifted the tone of the movie. Close to his death, Jobriath had said âI need to play piano for you so you know who I amâ?, it was as if he was aware of the mystery he was creating. Through the course of the documentary I kept expecting grand revelations of who this person was but we never get them. I think Turner does this intentionally, and if you are like me and never really knew who Jobriath was to begin with, I am sure you will leave this film eager to explore his music and see if you can discover him even further.

    Originally posted at iheartmoviesto.com Jobriath? The name sounded familiar but I just couldnâ(TM)t place it. It wasnâ(TM)t until after a few YouTube and Google searches that I remembered having listened to one of his songs from my co-workerâ(TM)s iPod. Jobriath was no David Bowie. He wasnâ(TM)t Marc Bolan. He wasnâ(TM)t Brian Eno, either. He was born Bruce Wayne Campell and became more well known than all of them. His manager at the time, Jerry Brandt, spent tens of thousands of dollars promoting an act through billboards and bus posters, interviews and articles before Jobriath had even released a single album. New York City, London and L.A. all knew his name and were expecting something BIG. Kinda like in the Josie and the Pussycats movie when Parker Posey sells the music before there is even music to buy. Jobriath a.k.a. âThe American David Bowieâ?, was the most promoted and hyped-up musician of his time with one major difference; Jobriath was openly gay. Being so open and honest about this sexuality led to his quick and untimely fall from grace. When his self-titled solo album finally got itâ(TM)s release, it was bombarded by homophobic music critics who made sure he fell hard, and it was a commercial flop. He was even rejected by the gay community that was struggling at the time with itâ(TM)s own identity. Leather daddy was acceptable, but glitter wearing rock fairy was not. Jobriath A.D. is a touching and honest documentary on the biggest 70â²s glam rock musician who never was. Well, never fully was. The documentary chronicles this outrageous and talented life, attempting to find out who was the man behind the performance. Jobriath A.D. opens with an animation of the Chelsea Hotel in New York City. Zoom into a bedroom and there we see a man alone, laying in the bed, looking sickly and watching TV. This is Jobriath. Flashback even further and we are brought to a stage production of Hair, where his short yet meaningful stage career is set in motion. Revealing an extremely private person without exploiting him, Jobriath A.D. creates a larger than life narrative with the help of those who were around him, who knew Jobriath as well as he would allow. He took on many names and persona in his career, and we see that change happen overtime in a way that is natural, making nothing in the film seem forced or out of place. The Midnight Special performance of Rock of Ages particularly stands out as a great example of 70â²s glam rock stage presence. The interviews move sympathetically from Jobriathâ(TM)s younger brother, to his outreach worker who was there when Jobriathâ(TM)s life was coming to an end, and to everyone whose life this recluse yet flamboyant performer had touched along the way (even Scissor Sistersâ(TM) Jake Shears comments on Jobriathâ(TM)s important contribution to the musical landscape of today). Director Kieran Turner manages to convey respect and honesty when stringing together the lifetime of an extremely talented and troubled artist. While watching, I immediately thought of another great, but fictional, movie about 70â²s glam rock(Velvet Goldmine) and I think most people will find the comparison easy. But donâ(TM)t let that fool you, even though it may feel familiar in the beginning, it is definitely a film which stands on itâ(TM)s own two feet. However, my only complaint were the animations during the film that seemed gimmicky (and perhaps a nod to Hedwig). But with that being said, the animation sequence made with paper cut-outs was well done and conveyed an appropriate emotion to the audience without slipping down a steep slope that would have totally shifted the tone of the movie. Close to his death, Jobriath had said âI need to play piano for you so you know who I amâ?, it was as if he was aware of the mystery he was creating. Through the course of the documentary I kept expecting grand revelations of who this person was but we never get them. I think Turner does this intentionally, and if you are like me and never really knew who Jobriath was to begin with, I am sure you will leave this film eager to explore his music and see if you can discover him even further.