Joker 3D (2012)

TOMATOMETER

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

Joker 3D Photos

Movie Info

Ever wondered if aliens were to visit a village that is not on the map of our country, what hell would break loose?! Joker is the story of Agastya (Akshay Kumar), a researcher probing the existence of aliens in the universe, who returns to his small little native village. The out of luck Agastya takes it upon himself to put his crazy village on the global map and continues with his alien exploration from there. While his plan gets the village attention from across the world, it also comes with a great deal of risk. Will aliens save the day for Akshay? Or will his plans fall like a pack of cards? Get set for India's first ever extra-terrestrial drama-comedy - Joker! -- (C) UTV
Rating:
NR
Genre:
Action & Adventure , Comedy , Science Fiction & Fantasy
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 limited
On DVD:
Runtime:
Studio:

Cast

Akshay Kumar
as Agastya
Minissha Lamba
as News Reporter
Show More Cast

Critic Reviews for Joker 3D

All Critics (4) | Top Critics (2)

No excerpt available.

Full Review… | January 21, 2013
Time Out
Top Critic

Another global hot spot generating fossil fuels? I thought Bollywood comedies had happy endings.

Full Review… | September 3, 2012
New York Times
Top Critic

Kunder has devised a simplistic story which has no coherent format.

Full Review… | September 6, 2012
Birmingham Mail

A film of such ineptitude does not come along very often, so lovers of train-wreck cinema may want to check it out. Everybody else - stay clear.

Full Review… | September 5, 2012
sbs.com.au

Audience Reviews for Joker 3D

½

Joker (Shrish Kunder, 2012) I'm afraid to ask my Indian friends what they think of Joker; every Hindi critic I've read on the subject called the film awful, many of them including it in their five worst movies of the year. My going hypothesis on why I enjoyed this movie as much as I did (aside from "I Want Just You", which at least one Bollyspice critic was compelled to say was the only good thing about the movie): Indian viewers have not yet been desensitized to utter crap by Hollywood. I mean, maybe I'm wrong, but I'm guessing that the average movie viewer in Bangalore wasn't subjected to Transformers: Dark of the Moon, The Island, About a Boy, the last four or five Hellraiser sequels... Plot: In 1947, when Pakistan was separating from India, the surveyors left out the village of Paglapur, which spent sixty-five years lying just outside the boundaries of three separate states. Now Agastya (OMG!'s Akshay Kumar), the only resident of Palagpur to ever leave the village, is called back from America after an urgent message from his brother: his father is very ill and will not live long. He goes back with his girlfriend Manali (Rowdy Rathore eye-popper Sonakshi Sinha), who asks why Agastya never told her he had a family. "You'll see," he tells her, and she does: Palagpur is, literally, a town of lunatics. It was previously home to India's largest asylum, and the reason it was never surveyed is that on the night that was supposed to happen, the lunatics escaped and, in essence, took over the town. (In the movie's opening scene, we see a surveyor attempting to get to Palagpur; later in the movie, we find he stayed on, and his grandson is now part of Palagpur's ruling elite.) Turns out the village has a water problem: a dam that was recently completed has cut off the town's water supply, so Agastya needs to figure out how to restore the town's water while working under a deadline for the American company he works for, building a machine capable of communicating with any intelligent life that may be found in outer space. None of the three border states are willing to take responsibility for the town, so Agastya comes up with a plan that will both draw attention to the town's plight and help with his deadline: the town creates a crop circle, and of course the media flocks to Paglapur... Like almost every other Bollywood movie I've seen, it's chock full of big song-and-dance numbers that my fifteen-month-old son was enchanted with. It's also got more than its share of references to other films (most obviously M. Night Shyamalan's Signs, though in an absurdist-comedy framework), which I found amusing, if not overly subtle. It's stupidly funny, if predictable. But again, I say this as someone who lives in a culture where our idea of "comedy" is Jackass, Chris Farley, and Adam Sandler. Obviously, it doesn't take much to amuse Americans. ** 1/2

Robert Beveridge
Robert Beveridge

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