Kill, Baby, Kill (Operazione paura) (Curse of the Living Dead) (Don't Walk in the Park) - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Kill, Baby, Kill (Operazione paura) (Curse of the Living Dead) (Don't Walk in the Park) Reviews

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½ July 2, 2016
A supernatural movie by Mario Bava. The plot feels a bit thrown together but the atmosphere is great.
November 14, 2015
Im dont think this is a real 5 star but this is 100% my favorite kind of movies, done exactly how i like it, every slice of visual is ripe with gothic velouria and creepy gossamer. Everybody spends their time screaming at the end of their wits surrounded by cobwebs, creepy dolls and an evil dead girly. Cant ask for more.
½ September 27, 2015
Very good Italian gothic horror from Mario Bava. The scenes and cinematography are spectacular. Saw on Netflix which has a version that doesn't do justice to Bava's artistry. Would love to see from an original print.
April 20, 2015
I feel like the next one to die is me.

A murderous ghost of a little girl haunts a small town in Europe that has no idea how to protect itself. One of the pending victims gets a letter out of the town that lands in the hands of an inspector. The inspector heads to the town in hopes of saving the girl but is too late. He is determined to stop the killer so no one ends up like the girl that wrote the letter.

"They'll get you; and I hope they do, it'll save me from firing this bullet."

Mario Bava, director of A Bay of Blood, Black Sunday, The Evil Eye, Baron Blood, Roy Colt and Winchester Jack, Planet of the Vampires, and Black Sabbath, delivers Kill Baby, Kill. The storyline for this picture has a classic horror feel with eerie ghost scenes that are a bit dated but fun to watch unfold. The acting is solid and the cast includes Erika Blanc, Piero Lulli, Giacomo Rossi-Stuart, Piero Lulli, and Micaela Esdra.

"They were victims of her hate."

I came across this on Netflix and thought it would be cool to watch a few Mario Bava classics (I haven't seen many of his films). This is one of the better ones I have seen to date and reminded me of the Vincent Price films from this era. The special effects are dated but fairly well done for the time. This is a must see for fans of classic horrors but isn't an all time classic.

"If you value your lives, leave tonight."

Grade: C+
½ March 28, 2015
Tried to watch it twice and still just couldn't get into it. The set-pieces were nice, but the story tried to be gothic and wasn't. It had too many inspector scenes that made it more of an old cop movie...
November 30, 2014
I saw this, my second Bava film, on a really poor-quality DVD, one of those horror 10 films on 3 disc packages, but I just loved it. Mind you, it's not in the same league as Black Sunday, and I think his style is better suited for black-and-white, but his wonderful craftsmanship shines through. Some really creepy moments, too. There's nothing like a really well-constructed ghost movie! =)
September 18, 2014
Creepy, atmospheric ghost movie. Very well done Italian horror film that is one of Bava's best. The titular ghost is straight up goose bump inducting. The history of why is adequate and it ends on a nightmarish dreamlike sequence. Only downside is the pacing is a little languid. A real slow burner that picks up real nice at the half way mark. Worth watching with the lights off and a cool breeze blowing against your window. Just be prepared to see Melissa in your dreams.
July 18, 2014
Here we go again with the great horror maestro Mario Bava. The thing that really stands out in his work is his attention to atmosphere, and Kill, Baby... Kill! certainly has plenty of atmosphere going for it. To be honest though, I'm not entirely sure what time period it's supposed to take place in. I know that it basically takes place in a village that's mostly backwards and superstitious, but it never takes a firm footing in a particular period. It also feels like an echo of something like The Fall of the House of Usher or The Raven, with the character of the outsider coming in to mysterious goings on and escaping with the damsel in the end. Yeah, I guess that's technically a spoiler, but the ending is a full-blown conclusion anyway. The plot is just merely ok, and the film overall is certainly not to be counted amongst Bava's best work. However, it's not to be overlooked completely. There's enough atmospheric and creepy things going on in this movie, and it certainly will hold your attention, so there's that. It's just a shame that it falls under the heading of bland most of the time.
½ March 27, 2014
Atmospheric gothic horror from Mario Bava.
February 21, 2014
Bava at his wicked best.
½ December 25, 2013
Mario Bava delivers a creepy atmosphere to this film about the killer ghost of a little girl.
December 8, 2013
"Operation Fear" is an early giallo classic. "Bava has never presented his moods so vividly and with such effervescence." "Vividly hued, deeply shadowed atmospheric mystery"
½ June 10, 2013
No coherency, no characters, no scares. What the hell was this and what was it trying to be?
½ June 9, 2013
Tried to watch it twice and still just couldn't get into it. The set-pieces were nice, but the story tried to be gothic and weren't. It had too many inspector scenes that made it more of an old cop movie..
½ June 9, 2013
Though the title suggests exploitative junk, "Kill, Baby, Kill" is just as masterful as any Mario Bava fan would expect. Nowadays he's either known for gothic tale "Black Sunday" or any of his giallo films, but this overlooked gem can easily be said to bring the landscape of an Edgar Allen Poe story to life, which is most definitely worth a look. It dabbles in witchcraft and the strange; only things we cannot be completely sure of. "Kill, Baby, Kill" is one of Bava's best films, and certainly one of the most memorable horror movies I've ever seen.
Dr. Paul Eswai (Giacomo Rossi-Stuart) has arrived in a small Italian village (that looks more like it rests on the outskirts of Transylvania) to investigate the mysterious death of a young woman. The town is hardly shocked: deaths with a sliver of an explanation seems to be their specialty. They're convinced that the ghost of a young girl named Melissa, the daughter of the formerly wealthy Graps family, is responsible. Eswai isn't so sure, but the longer he stays, the more his doubts turn into fears.
He's aided by the enigmatic Monica (Erica Blanc), who seems to be troubled by something, and the local sorceress (Fabienne Dali), who has been placing gold coins in the victims' hearts to ward off any more supernatural disturbance. But will it do any good?
"Kill, Baby, Kill" is completely preposterous, but to call it campy would be an insult. Bava never geared in that direction (with the exception of the riotous "Danger: Diabolik"), and instead he makes yet another beautiful, yet chilling, horror film that manages to scare us in a way that no other movie in the genre truly can.
The film is more about atmosphere than a great script or good performances. Bava almost at once can give us the feeling of uneasiness, as the sets are often shadowy and the music is subtly creepy; strange camera angles and speedily panned shots complete the artistry that Bava so easily conveys. Though you could say Bava was a part of the "big three" of Italian horror directors (the other two being Dario Argento and Lucio Fulci), nobody then, or now, has ever been able to match the mood Bava sets in his films.
The cinematography is colorful and dreamlike, but it works in the way that "Suspiria" does; it takes an eye-catching setting and transforms it into a nightmare. The town that the film revolves around throughout its duration normally would be a rustic village, but here it's claustrophobic and utterly terrifying. You feel as though there's no escaping to the point where you wonder why the characters manage to stay for such a long time.
"Kill, Baby, Kill" in the meantime utilizes one of the scariest themes in horror: a mere child as its central villain. Some of the spookiest moments of the film involve a ghostly little girl pressing her hand (or face) against a window with menace; another impressive depiction is from Bava's genius experimentation, in which we experience a child swinging, from the eye of the beholder. The camera pans in and out with gusto-- it sounds strange on paper, but it's strangely fascinating to see at what lengths Bava would go to make his viewers anxious.
"Kill, Baby, Kill" is not merely frightening-- it's artistically thrilling. For people who haven't experienced the masterwork of Mario Bava, this is a great film to start with.
½ March 25, 2013
Mario Bava is an Italian maestro of the giallo (Italian mystery thriller) especially those with low budgets. Many themes prominent of the genre are present here but Bava manages to direct this Gothic horror with such beauty and excellence that despite it's many flaws (which includes the acting and overdubbing) is a winner of the genre. Not for everyone unless you're an insomniac and nothing else is on or you really dig mystery thrillers.
March 14, 2013
Loved it absolutely loved it! great movie with all the horror elements and no disgusting stuff too! need subtitles though! but a great movie and a must watch flick!
½ March 13, 2013
A baroque horror film directed masterfully like a hallucination by Mario Bava, the best and more influential Italian auteur of the horror genre.
½ February 28, 2013
It's amazing how Bava -- what with his primitive/amateur editing techniques, cheap-ass stage sets and utterly careless approach to continuity (both narrative and in regards to something simple, like wardrobe) -- can more accurately capture the illogical/surreal/non-linear nature of the dream-zone than any CGI bullshit like 'Inception.'
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