Kirikou et les bêtes sauvages (Kirikou and the Wild Beasts) Reviews

  • Aug 03, 2013

    "Kirikou and the Wild Beasts" is a sub-story of the outstanding "Kirikou and the Sorceress." It is a collection of anecdotes told by Kirikou's grandfather where Kirikou interacts with animals. The animation is good, but it feels very bland since there is nothing really interesting or different to animate. The story also feels short since its not a story, but a collection of anecdotes which plays more like a TV show for 5 year-olds than a tour-de-force film for all ages like its predecessor. To sum up this film, I could say that this film keeps most of the technical achievements that the previous boasted, but has lazier writing and direction. Kids will love it since it has so many positive messages, relatable characters, unique style, and an entertaining story line. However, I was expecting a richer story from Ocelot. Yet Kirikou is such a wonderful character and the greatest role model for any kid. I also love that the Kirikou films show that nude bodies should not be exploited nor shameful. There are plenty of fully or semi-nude characters since it is how people in Africa live. Karaba is not as scary as she used to be now that we understand her better, but she is well-rounded. There is a lot of dry humor and intelligent humor in the writing that kids and parents will enjoy likewise. "Kirikou and the WIld Beasts" is an ideal film for all children aged 8 and under, but parents or film lovers may find it entertaining but weak in quality and tiring.

    "Kirikou and the Wild Beasts" is a sub-story of the outstanding "Kirikou and the Sorceress." It is a collection of anecdotes told by Kirikou's grandfather where Kirikou interacts with animals. The animation is good, but it feels very bland since there is nothing really interesting or different to animate. The story also feels short since its not a story, but a collection of anecdotes which plays more like a TV show for 5 year-olds than a tour-de-force film for all ages like its predecessor. To sum up this film, I could say that this film keeps most of the technical achievements that the previous boasted, but has lazier writing and direction. Kids will love it since it has so many positive messages, relatable characters, unique style, and an entertaining story line. However, I was expecting a richer story from Ocelot. Yet Kirikou is such a wonderful character and the greatest role model for any kid. I also love that the Kirikou films show that nude bodies should not be exploited nor shameful. There are plenty of fully or semi-nude characters since it is how people in Africa live. Karaba is not as scary as she used to be now that we understand her better, but she is well-rounded. There is a lot of dry humor and intelligent humor in the writing that kids and parents will enjoy likewise. "Kirikou and the WIld Beasts" is an ideal film for all children aged 8 and under, but parents or film lovers may find it entertaining but weak in quality and tiring.

  • Apr 12, 2013

    Same as 'Kirikou and The Sorceress'.

    Same as 'Kirikou and The Sorceress'.

  • Jul 20, 2012

    [b]Kirikou et les betes sauvages[/b] ([i]Kirikou and the Wild Beasts[/i]) [color=Red]6.5/10[/color] :fresh: [img]http://img54.imageshack.us/img54/5933/kirikou4xk8.jpg[/img] [i]Kirikou et les betes sauvages[/i] is a sequel to [i]Kirikou et la sorciere[/i], which I've never seen. The diminutive star of the show is little Kirikou - a baby who is nonetheless able to talk, run faster than a hyena (for great stretches of time no less), and out think pretty much everyone and everything. He's also entirely naked. But then, given he lives in a small African village, that's understandable. Actually, a quick note for those of a prudish disposition - Kirikou is a French movie, and has French sensibilities. The African women are eternally topless, the children are entirely naked, and whilst not exactly anatomically [i]correct[/i] they're not neutered. If you're of the "breasts are bad" brigade then you should probably skip it. None of the parents or kids at the showing I went to seemed to have any problem with it at all, which is great. Anyway, Kirikou has (apparently) saved the village from the evil sorceress and returned water to his village in the first movie. In this one our little hero continues to battle the sorceress' machinations and her evil creatures (called [url=http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/fetish]"fetishes"[/url] and we're not talking whips and chains, but rather wooden "robots"). Les betes sauvages is comprised of four connected tales whereing Kirikou deals with a ravaging hyena, a possessed oxen, and a timely giraffe. The fourth tale, curiously, doesn't deal with beasts at all, but rather plants. In each case Kirikou is shown to be smarter than his village, although initially ignored and derided only to lead them to triumph, and dancing. [center][img]http://img208.imageshack.us/img208/5602/kirikouxg9.jpg[/img] [img]http://img54.imageshack.us/img54/8972/0360p1zr0.jpg[/img][/center] The stories are fairly simple - this is very much a kid's cartoon, albeit without the usual pandering that the likes of Disney these days inject - and the animation itself is unsophisticated though bearing a distinct stylistic charm. Kirikou's journey across large chunks of Africa on the head of the giraffe in the third story gives the animators the chance to show off some delightful backgrounds and wonderful scenery while the inevitable dances at the end of each tale are probably the most complicated the animation gets. Kirikou won't hang with you as the likes of Les Triplets or anything by our man Miyazaki, but for an afternoon's light entertainment c'est bon.

    [b]Kirikou et les betes sauvages[/b] ([i]Kirikou and the Wild Beasts[/i]) [color=Red]6.5/10[/color] :fresh: [img]http://img54.imageshack.us/img54/5933/kirikou4xk8.jpg[/img] [i]Kirikou et les betes sauvages[/i] is a sequel to [i]Kirikou et la sorciere[/i], which I've never seen. The diminutive star of the show is little Kirikou - a baby who is nonetheless able to talk, run faster than a hyena (for great stretches of time no less), and out think pretty much everyone and everything. He's also entirely naked. But then, given he lives in a small African village, that's understandable. Actually, a quick note for those of a prudish disposition - Kirikou is a French movie, and has French sensibilities. The African women are eternally topless, the children are entirely naked, and whilst not exactly anatomically [i]correct[/i] they're not neutered. If you're of the "breasts are bad" brigade then you should probably skip it. None of the parents or kids at the showing I went to seemed to have any problem with it at all, which is great. Anyway, Kirikou has (apparently) saved the village from the evil sorceress and returned water to his village in the first movie. In this one our little hero continues to battle the sorceress' machinations and her evil creatures (called [url=http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/fetish]"fetishes"[/url] and we're not talking whips and chains, but rather wooden "robots"). Les betes sauvages is comprised of four connected tales whereing Kirikou deals with a ravaging hyena, a possessed oxen, and a timely giraffe. The fourth tale, curiously, doesn't deal with beasts at all, but rather plants. In each case Kirikou is shown to be smarter than his village, although initially ignored and derided only to lead them to triumph, and dancing. [center][img]http://img208.imageshack.us/img208/5602/kirikouxg9.jpg[/img] [img]http://img54.imageshack.us/img54/8972/0360p1zr0.jpg[/img][/center] The stories are fairly simple - this is very much a kid's cartoon, albeit without the usual pandering that the likes of Disney these days inject - and the animation itself is unsophisticated though bearing a distinct stylistic charm. Kirikou's journey across large chunks of Africa on the head of the giraffe in the third story gives the animators the chance to show off some delightful backgrounds and wonderful scenery while the inevitable dances at the end of each tale are probably the most complicated the animation gets. Kirikou won't hang with you as the likes of Les Triplets or anything by our man Miyazaki, but for an afternoon's light entertainment c'est bon.

  • Feb 18, 2012

    Poor writing and a lame voice off make for an awful sequel.

    Poor writing and a lame voice off make for an awful sequel.

  • Jul 29, 2011

    A beautiful and well-made french animated movie, is so cute and has a good plot and the charism of Kiriku is what makes the plot continuing.

    A beautiful and well-made french animated movie, is so cute and has a good plot and the charism of Kiriku is what makes the plot continuing.

  • Nov 13, 2010

    Cuando parecía que la animación tradicional, cuadro por cuadro y dibujada "a mano" estaba condenada a la desaparición, llegan muestras como Kirikou y las Bestias Salvajes (Kirikou et les bêtes sauvages, 2005) dispuestas a demostrar lo contrario. Las posibilidades creativas de esta antigua técnica siguen siendo infinitas, y esta tardía secuela de Kirikou y la Hechicera (1998) no necesita ser tan elaborada y con complejos efectos visuales. Dirigida nuevamente por Michel Ocelot, ahora haciendo equipo en la realización junto a Bénédicte Galup, el atractivo -obvia decirlo- sigue siendo el minúsculo personaje del título, Kirikou (ahora con la voz de Pierre-Ndoffé Sarr), suerte de Pulgarcito instalado en África, que tiene la capacidad de obrar milagros tan sólo con su optimismo. Kirikou es capaz de levantar el ánimo de los habitantes de su aldea cuando las cosas amenazan con ir mal. Como en el anterior filme, la hechicera Karaba (voz de Awa Sene Sarr) tiene aterrorizada a la comunidad con un ejercito de criaturas de piedra, llamadas "fetiches". Graciosa y sin otra pretensión que entretener, con partes impresionantes como la persecución de la hiena o el viaje sobre la jirafa, el problema de esta secuela es que no supera o iguala a su predecesora, que combinaba perfectamente el tono de leyenda con el divertimento familiar. En la primera película no hubo necesidad de introducir a los torpes e inútiles fetiches robotizados, que aquí hacen un estorboso acto de presencia. Es una lástima también la corta y floja participación de la hechicera Karaba, la villana estrella, cuya magia negra aquí casi brilla por su ausencia. Más en pantallanueve.blogspot.com

    Cuando parecía que la animación tradicional, cuadro por cuadro y dibujada "a mano" estaba condenada a la desaparición, llegan muestras como Kirikou y las Bestias Salvajes (Kirikou et les bêtes sauvages, 2005) dispuestas a demostrar lo contrario. Las posibilidades creativas de esta antigua técnica siguen siendo infinitas, y esta tardía secuela de Kirikou y la Hechicera (1998) no necesita ser tan elaborada y con complejos efectos visuales. Dirigida nuevamente por Michel Ocelot, ahora haciendo equipo en la realización junto a Bénédicte Galup, el atractivo -obvia decirlo- sigue siendo el minúsculo personaje del título, Kirikou (ahora con la voz de Pierre-Ndoffé Sarr), suerte de Pulgarcito instalado en África, que tiene la capacidad de obrar milagros tan sólo con su optimismo. Kirikou es capaz de levantar el ánimo de los habitantes de su aldea cuando las cosas amenazan con ir mal. Como en el anterior filme, la hechicera Karaba (voz de Awa Sene Sarr) tiene aterrorizada a la comunidad con un ejercito de criaturas de piedra, llamadas "fetiches". Graciosa y sin otra pretensión que entretener, con partes impresionantes como la persecución de la hiena o el viaje sobre la jirafa, el problema de esta secuela es que no supera o iguala a su predecesora, que combinaba perfectamente el tono de leyenda con el divertimento familiar. En la primera película no hubo necesidad de introducir a los torpes e inútiles fetiches robotizados, que aquí hacen un estorboso acto de presencia. Es una lástima también la corta y floja participación de la hechicera Karaba, la villana estrella, cuya magia negra aquí casi brilla por su ausencia. Más en pantallanueve.blogspot.com

  • Oct 07, 2010

    Kirikou protects his village from a wolf, sells ceramics, escapes fetishes on the head of a giraffe, and cures a sickness.

    Kirikou protects his village from a wolf, sells ceramics, escapes fetishes on the head of a giraffe, and cures a sickness.

  • Sep 23, 2010

    Lovely animated movie; without high pretensions, Michael Ocelot gets a memorable story.

    Lovely animated movie; without high pretensions, Michael Ocelot gets a memorable story.

  • Dec 17, 2009

    Yet another simple, direct but engaging Kirikou: the message is to be generous to one's fellow and to always endeavor to think things through.

    Yet another simple, direct but engaging Kirikou: the message is to be generous to one's fellow and to always endeavor to think things through.

  • Dec 09, 2009

    I liked it very much In this film we learn that the fammilly is very important particulary the mothers because in the last part kirikou and his friends do everything they can to go to kaaba's house to steel the yellow flower to save their mother, and for doing that they use their mothers things

    I liked it very much In this film we learn that the fammilly is very important particulary the mothers because in the last part kirikou and his friends do everything they can to go to kaaba's house to steel the yellow flower to save their mother, and for doing that they use their mothers things