Kirk Cameron's Saving Christmas (2014) - Rotten Tomatoes

Kirk Cameron's Saving Christmas (2014)

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Every year at Christmas time it seems the baby in the manger takes more and more of a backseat to retail sales, Santa Claus, and political correctness. With "Merry Christmas" being replaced by "Seasons Greetings" and court ordered removal of public nativity scenes, the fruit of Mary's womb is falling on hard times. But this year, Kirk Cameron is taking back Christmas with his engaging new movie KIRK CAMERON'S SAVING CHRISTMAS. Opening in select theaters November 14, the newest movie from the star of Fireproof and Unstoppable is filled with laughter, warmth, and God-honoring cheer! KIRK CAMERON'S SAVING CHRISTMAS will change the way your family sees and celebrates this magical time of year. In KIRK CAMERON'S SAVING CHRISTMAS, Kirk's sister's annual Christmas party is about to be ruined by Kirk's brother-in-law Christian, who is chock full of no-fun Scroogery. Kirk realizes it's his job to grab Christian by his seasonal sweater and show him Christ where Christ has always been: smack dab at the center of all the Christmas hoopla. KIRK CAMERON'S SAVING CHRISTMAS provides a biblical basis for our favorite time-honored traditions and celebrations, and the inspiration to stand strongly against a culture that wants to trivialize and eliminate the faith elements of this holy season. This Christmas, have your family join with Kirk Cameron's family and dive headfirst into all the joy, dancing, celebration, feasting, imagination, and traditions that glorify the true "reason for the season." Take in the splendor; take in the majesty; take in the story. Take it all in ... and then take back Christmas!I (C) IDP/Samuel Goldwyn

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Critic Reviews for Kirk Cameron's Saving Christmas

All Critics (13) | Top Critics (7)

It is The Room of Christmas movies. Actually, The Room is more enjoyable. But you get the idea.

November 21, 2014 | Rating: 0/4 | Full Review…

Had "Saving Christmas" run any longer, Cameron would no doubt have found a way to find the divinity in Frosty, Rudolph, the Grinch, peppermint bark, the Elf on the Shelf, frosted cranberry hand soap and Mr. Hanky the Christmas Poo.

November 14, 2014 | Full Review…

Perhaps the only Christmas movie I can think of, especially of the religious-themed variety, that seems to flat-out endorse materialism, greed and outright gluttony.

November 14, 2014 | Rating: 1/4 | Full Review…

Virtually everything about this production feels thrown together.

November 14, 2014 | Full Review…

This may be one of the least artful holiday films ever made. Even devout born-again Christians will find this hard to stomach.

November 13, 2014 | Rating: 1/4 | Full Review…

With a smile so wide and laughter that sounds so forced you half-expect the camera to pull back to reveal hostage takers, Mr. Cameron explains how several facets of the holiday - the tree, Santa Claus, gifts - have roots in religious tradition.

November 13, 2014 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for Kirk Cameron's Saving Christmas

½

Kirk Cameron explores the roots of several seemingly secular traditions of the holiday season in Saving Christmas. When his brother-in-law expresses his disillusionment at how secularized Christmas has become, Cameron walks him through the biblical origins for decorated trees, the symbology of the Nativity at the beginning of winter, St. Nicholas, and other various Christmas iconography. However, these explanations are really flimsy and don't have the ring of truth. Also, the acting is terrible and the sets look rather cheap. In the end Saving Christmas doesn't make a convincing argument, and comes off as a desperate attempt to keep Christ in Christmas.

Dann Michalski
Dann Michalski

Super Reviewer

Un-Christian in the worst, most commercial way. Maybe Santa can buy the scriptwriter some writing classes for Christmas?

Christian C
Christian C

Super Reviewer

½

Given the title, Kirk Cameron's prominent placement, and a poster involving Cameron with a background explosion of holiday paraphernalia, one would assume Saving Christmas would concern itself with the oft-repeated "War on Christmas." I was expecting Cameron to lament our use of "Happy Holidays" and the like. Perplexingly, Cameron's war is not with those outside Christianity but those within. Saving Christmas is a shoddy evangelical sermon with shoddier theology, straining to fill out a running time, and ultimately being pro-materialism and anti-empathy. Come again? At Kirk's (Cameron) family Christmas party, his brother-in-law Christian (Darren Doane) is a Grinch. He complains that Christmas has been co-opted by secularism. Santa Claus and other symbols with pagan origins dwarf the nativity and baby Jesus. Christian removes himself from the party and sits in his car. Kirk won't allow this to stand. He gets inside the car and proceeds to explain why Christian is wrong about Christmas. To call this a film is to be more charitable than perhaps even Jesus would be. Saving Christmas (or Kirk Cameron's Saving Christmas as listed in certain places) is a smug sermon presented by Kirk Cameron lecturing his "bro"-in-law in a car. The majority of the film takes place in a parked car. If that sounds deeply cinematic to you, then stick with me. The film shambles its way to 80-minutes, exasperating to fill out a minimum feature-length running time. There's about ten minutes of "hilarious" bloopers. There's a five-minute opening where Cameron speaks directly into the camera and sips from his mug of hot chocolate three separate times. There's a five-minute, though it feels torturously endless, "hip hop Christmas dance" performance by a bunch of white people (it is powerfully uncoordinated, like you're watching someone's home movie of their kids). You do get to watch Cameron effectively do the Worm, though (his finest acting moment onscreen, in my humble opinion). There's also the occasional, very tin-eared comedy break with supporting characters that skirt the line into stereotypes. When it all comes together, there's maybe a total of 40 minutes of an actual movie here, laboriously stretched out. And when I say "movie" I mean Cameron and Christian talking back and forth in a stationary car. This is not a movie. At all. Director and co-writer Doane is one of the most inept filmmakers I've observed. This is a horrible looking movie with many clueless edits and strange visual compositions. His onscreen wife is always seen looking wary and in slow motion, like her face has frozen. There's also the annoying habit of not properly framing his subjects, who will get caught behind a pot of hot chocolate or some poinsettias. This is just bad filmmaking. The lighting is amateurish or overdone, like when Kirk spends about five minutes standing backlit, as to communicate his inherently angelic nature. Doane will also keep focusing on repeating scenes like he's filling time. The film has a very rushed and patched-together feel, as if they had a weekend to film it at Cameron's place with his friends and family. The "comedy relief" is also terribly executed, with two characters having a conversation holding mugs to their face, the better to disguise the fact that one of them is not actually speaking his lines. The pacing is also dead. The movie keeps faking you out when it's going to end but then continues on, overstaying its welcome so Cameron can have yet another victory lap to hear himself talk. Cameron and his producers seem to subscribe to an all-or-nothing approach when it comes to recognizing the malleable symbolism of cultural artifacts. Is there any harm in acknowledging the past connections of certain ceremonial customs and artifacts we use today? While the origins of the Christmas tree can go back to the pagans, Cameron seems to forget to mention that it was Martin Luther who took the Christmas tree as a German holiday tradition and gave it a Christian spin. Of course acknowledging such would indicate that the Christmas tree wasn't always the same symbol. But who cares? History is a melting pot as far as cultures are concerned, and we pick up many customs that become passed down for various reasons, often expanding and adapting. Is there any implicit harm in simply admitting that a Christmas tree has an origin that predates Christianity? Today it is a different symbol commemorating a different holiday. Just because we know history doesn't somehow devalue our customs and traditions. Cameron and his cronies seem to disagree, which is why he presents flimsy arguments to reclaim historical authority. What he's really doing is treating the symbols of the season as metaphors, applying deeper meaning to them. That's fine and good. If Cameron wants to see the Christmas tree as a representation of the cross, or the trees of the Garden of Eden, that's fine. But he shouldn't pretend that this interpretation is gospel. That's the thing about metaphors; they're subjective and pliable. They are not absolute. Amazingly, Saving Christmas ends up becoming a misguided and ludicrous defense of materialism and the commercialism attached to Christmas. In Cameron's very narrow perspective, anything associated with the holiday has to be positive. Yes, Cameron literally argues that all the material excess and spending actually honors God. Instead of looking at the presents under the tree as just that, look at them as the outline of a skyline of a new Jerusalem, Cameron offers in one of the more head-scratching moments. He conflates the spending of money with celebration, admonishing people to buy "the biggest ham, the richest butter" as long as they just don't "max out their credit cards." That's the limit he sets, so everything below that must be agreeable. Just to hammer the message home further, Cameron says that materialism is good because "Christ was made material." That sure is a slippery slope of ethics there. It's not much of a leap to then justify greed or to equate spending the most money with being the godliest. Why would any film, let alone a Christian one, choose to defend unchecked materialism? I know Christian is more a foil for Cameron to helpfully inform, a straw man who cannot articulate his intellectual rationale, but Christian is the worst skeptic of all time. If he truly believed what he does then he should be able to provide evidence to support his stance. It wouldn't be hard. The historical record is loaded with stuff ready-made to counter-argue Kirk's cherry picking of relevant theology. The very concept of late December existing as a pagan holiday celebrating the winter solstice (Saturnalia) is backed up by a treasure-trove of sources, despite Cameron's snide rejoinder that "last time I checked, God created the winter solstice." The Romans would even exchange gifts on December 23rd in celebration and feast. If Christian were a real skeptic, he'd at least have a cursory knowledge of this stuff before even approaching specifics. Instead he sputters and is proven to be a fraud, duped into believing these anti-Christmas thoughts. Every time Kirk finishes another of his rather unconvincing asides, Christian shakes his head, dumbfounded, and says he never looked at things like that. He is the most easily converted skeptic since the Spanish Inquisition. I kept going back in my head to a vital point of Christian's that is never referenced or challenged by Cameron: wouldn't all this money be better spent helping the disadvantaged? Christian looks at the extravagant money spent on an ostentatious party and thinks of how many people could have been fed, how many wells could have been dug in villages. "You're wrong," Kirk says. "About everything. You've drunk the Kool-Aid." Even as Cameron bends over backwards to defend materialism, he never addresses Christian's fundamental point, which is that the money can be better spent elsewhere. to the movie's worldview, Christian is a "jerk" and he's "terrorizing" (I kid you not, they specifically use the word "terrorize") his family with his negativity. This is a guy who wants to put the "Christ back in Christmas" and he's setup as the bad guy. He's not storming the party, aggressively challenging people, calling them names. He sits to himself, eventually leaving the space for his car. It doesn't sound like he's terrorizing anyone and is rather considerate of others. No matter, no one is allowed to have a different opinion than Kirk Cameron and so he will not allow one man's empathy to bring everyone else down as they spend lavishly to celebrate the birth of a poor carpenter. And that's what's most distressing for me when it comes to this poorly made and poorly reasoned movie; I'm concerned that others will use Cameron's distorted teaching as a justification for excess over empathy. Cameron seems to use the film as a defense of his affluent privilege. He uses the Bible to back up his lifestyle and to defend materialism. Did we forget that part where Jesus said to sell all your possessions and help the poor? The film is packaged as a comedy and a family movie with a spiritually uplifting message, but what's so uplifting about saying "SPEND SPEND SPEND" is how you show love? Just because Cameron says a nutcracker is representative of King Herod's foot soldiers prowling Jerusalem for the baby Jesus doesn't make it strictly so. To call this a movie would be too charitable and I am not in the season of giving. Saving Christmas is a lump of coal disguised as a open-hearted message. Skip this movie and donate your money instead to some charity. At least that will do some actual good. Nate's Grade: D

Nate Zoebl
Nate Zoebl

Super Reviewer

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