Korol Lir (King Lear) Reviews

  • Jan 15, 2012

    One of the best cinematic interpretations,

    One of the best cinematic interpretations,

  • Walter M Super Reviewer
    Aug 16, 2010

    King Lear(Juri Jarvet), sensing the end is near with his failing faculties, decides to divide his kingdom between his three daughters in order to avert war. But first they must tell him how much they love him. His two eldest daughters Goneril(Elza Radzina) and Regan(Galina Volchek) lay it on a little thick while the youngest, Cordelia(Valentina Shendrikova), does not kiss up to the old man. In response, she is disowned while the Duke of Kent(Vladimir Yemelyanov) is exiled when he protests too much. Despite this, the King of France(Juozas Budraitis) still agrees to marry her. As Lear is about to go walkabout with his fool(Oleg Dal), Gloucester's(Karlis Sebris) illegitimate son Edmund(Regimantas Adomaitis) is starting to plot... This version of Shakespeare's tragedy about filial love comes to life with its black and white cinematography and fiery performances. As deliberate as the movie starts, it ends with a full crescendo of heartbreak and action, played to the hilt. In the end, the question remains whether or not it had to conclude this way.

    King Lear(Juri Jarvet), sensing the end is near with his failing faculties, decides to divide his kingdom between his three daughters in order to avert war. But first they must tell him how much they love him. His two eldest daughters Goneril(Elza Radzina) and Regan(Galina Volchek) lay it on a little thick while the youngest, Cordelia(Valentina Shendrikova), does not kiss up to the old man. In response, she is disowned while the Duke of Kent(Vladimir Yemelyanov) is exiled when he protests too much. Despite this, the King of France(Juozas Budraitis) still agrees to marry her. As Lear is about to go walkabout with his fool(Oleg Dal), Gloucester's(Karlis Sebris) illegitimate son Edmund(Regimantas Adomaitis) is starting to plot... This version of Shakespeare's tragedy about filial love comes to life with its black and white cinematography and fiery performances. As deliberate as the movie starts, it ends with a full crescendo of heartbreak and action, played to the hilt. In the end, the question remains whether or not it had to conclude this way.

  • May 11, 2010

    Russian works reallly well for Shakespeare. Quite the depressing setting, with some very nice scene interpretations. Definitely worth watching

    Russian works reallly well for Shakespeare. Quite the depressing setting, with some very nice scene interpretations. Definitely worth watching

  • Jan 18, 2010

    http://the5throw.blogspot.com/2010/01/korol-lir.html

    http://the5throw.blogspot.com/2010/01/korol-lir.html

  • Dec 24, 2009

    Solid version of Lear, with the only serious fault the music overplaying some of the more intense moments.

    Solid version of Lear, with the only serious fault the music overplaying some of the more intense moments.

  • Sep 06, 2009

    An interesting take on an earlier version of "Parents Just Don't Understand" by the original Will S. The various constraints inherent to this piece (those of the era in which its written, as well as that in which its filmed and, likely, a few others) keep me from enjoying it as thoroughly as I'd like. Nor however (thanks in large part to the more talented members of this cast) is the film entirely devoid of moments which seem more genuine.

    An interesting take on an earlier version of "Parents Just Don't Understand" by the original Will S. The various constraints inherent to this piece (those of the era in which its written, as well as that in which its filmed and, likely, a few others) keep me from enjoying it as thoroughly as I'd like. Nor however (thanks in large part to the more talented members of this cast) is the film entirely devoid of moments which seem more genuine.

  • Aug 27, 2009

    The Russian mastery of ponderously melancholy, existential desperation and unremitting despair is impressive in the catalogue of human cultures...their take on King Lear is thus appropriately shrouded and kissed all over by Death. I'm actually a little surprised I didn't kill myself after/while seeing this, but then, I've perhaps been inoculated by being a Prokofiev fan. Just a hunch.

    The Russian mastery of ponderously melancholy, existential desperation and unremitting despair is impressive in the catalogue of human cultures...their take on King Lear is thus appropriately shrouded and kissed all over by Death. I'm actually a little surprised I didn't kill myself after/while seeing this, but then, I've perhaps been inoculated by being a Prokofiev fan. Just a hunch.

  • Aug 27, 2009

    It should come as no surprise that the Soviet Union produced the greatest adaptations of Shakespeare, because the best understanding of human nature and humanism (and liberalism and capitalism) is Marxist/communist.

    It should come as no surprise that the Soviet Union produced the greatest adaptations of Shakespeare, because the best understanding of human nature and humanism (and liberalism and capitalism) is Marxist/communist.

  • Aug 27, 2009

    hard to describe. beautiful, for one thing - hard & luscious black & white, terrific contrasts of b&w, terrific textures, but also (re "Lear" the play) incredibly gruelling, unremitting & profound. terrific cast. captures the forces of nature in the play. phew.

    hard to describe. beautiful, for one thing - hard & luscious black & white, terrific contrasts of b&w, terrific textures, but also (re "Lear" the play) incredibly gruelling, unremitting & profound. terrific cast. captures the forces of nature in the play. phew.

  • Aug 27, 2009

    A rather superb adaptation of Shakespeare's King Lear - done Russian style! Beautifully shot, marvellously acted and gripping from beginning to end. Well worth a look.

    A rather superb adaptation of Shakespeare's King Lear - done Russian style! Beautifully shot, marvellously acted and gripping from beginning to end. Well worth a look.