Lady Whirlwind Reviews

  • Apr 18, 2009

    Golden Harvest treasure ..........

    Golden Harvest treasure ..........

  • Aug 08, 2008

    Although “Lady Whirlwind” is oft spoke/written of as an almost exclusively Angelo Mao fu vehicle, she is not the only tough woman in this movie. There are three significant female characters in this movie, two that you wouldn’t want to mess with: Angela and the woman playing the Japanese matriarch. The latter even wields a whip at one point in the movie. Kudos to Raymond Chow and associates at Golden Harvest for giving us some strong females in a kung fu movie! The plot of “Lady Whirlwind” is a little convoluted at best. Two main sub-plots abound: 1) a standard (for an early ‘70s HK fu flick) Japanese vs. Chinese sub-plot, and 2) the main conflict between Mao’s character and the male lead character, played by Chang Yi. Of course, in going after Yi, Mao ends up in conflict with the Japanese (who are the main bad-guys in the flick), since Yi is the central Chinese character at play in the first sub-plot. Mao certainly kicks Japanese ass to get to Yi, but only after she states, “I have nothing against you guys…I want to kill [Yi]”. There are many little twists and turns that do little to clarify the plot lines (at least in the English dub), but both Mao and Yi, who are flawed characters to say the least, get some redemption during the plot development as both befriend someone in need leading to their own growth. While fights are generally good (and fairly numerous and long) there are some very noticeable gaffs in some of the fights (hits and kicks not coming even remotely close–probably says something about the budget and lack of multiple takes, since Sammo Hung did the action direction and even early in his career he was generally solid). There’s lots of knife play and hand-to-hand martial combat (fu vs. karate), with moderate levels of blood, as might be expected of a Golden Harvest production. As a bonus we get to see Sammo playing a bad-guy (Japanese thug)–certainly a rarity in his early career–while the role is small, Sammo is fun to watch, especially with his make-up, nasty facial scars and muttonchops.

    Although “Lady Whirlwind” is oft spoke/written of as an almost exclusively Angelo Mao fu vehicle, she is not the only tough woman in this movie. There are three significant female characters in this movie, two that you wouldn’t want to mess with: Angela and the woman playing the Japanese matriarch. The latter even wields a whip at one point in the movie. Kudos to Raymond Chow and associates at Golden Harvest for giving us some strong females in a kung fu movie! The plot of “Lady Whirlwind” is a little convoluted at best. Two main sub-plots abound: 1) a standard (for an early ‘70s HK fu flick) Japanese vs. Chinese sub-plot, and 2) the main conflict between Mao’s character and the male lead character, played by Chang Yi. Of course, in going after Yi, Mao ends up in conflict with the Japanese (who are the main bad-guys in the flick), since Yi is the central Chinese character at play in the first sub-plot. Mao certainly kicks Japanese ass to get to Yi, but only after she states, “I have nothing against you guys…I want to kill [Yi]”. There are many little twists and turns that do little to clarify the plot lines (at least in the English dub), but both Mao and Yi, who are flawed characters to say the least, get some redemption during the plot development as both befriend someone in need leading to their own growth. While fights are generally good (and fairly numerous and long) there are some very noticeable gaffs in some of the fights (hits and kicks not coming even remotely close–probably says something about the budget and lack of multiple takes, since Sammo Hung did the action direction and even early in his career he was generally solid). There’s lots of knife play and hand-to-hand martial combat (fu vs. karate), with moderate levels of blood, as might be expected of a Golden Harvest production. As a bonus we get to see Sammo playing a bad-guy (Japanese thug)–certainly a rarity in his early career–while the role is small, Sammo is fun to watch, especially with his make-up, nasty facial scars and muttonchops.