Larceny, Inc. - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Larceny, Inc. Reviews

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½ February 14, 2015
Larceny, Inc. is an incredible film. It is about three ex-cons buy a luggage shop to tunnel into the bank vault next door. Edward G. Robinson and Broderick Crawford give amazing performances. The screenplay is well written. Lloyd Bacon did a great job directing this movie. I enjoyed watching this motion picture because of the drama and humor.
September 27, 2014
A really fun gangster comedy with Edward G. Robinson--whom I respect more with each film of his that I watch. It was also fun watching early roles here for Jane Wyman, Broderick Crawford, Jackie Gleason and Anthony Quinn. Highly recommended--I loved it a lot.
July 21, 2013
Apart from a few tiny smirks, there's little to recommend this. It's dated in the extreme and is barely a notch above a bad Three Stooges film. Even though it's meant to be a farce of some sort, the plot is tiresome and ludicrous with the luggage salesman especially irritating. 5.5/10
January 4, 2013
Edward G, Broderick Crawford, and a bank heist? Boy, milk and honey! Throw in bit parts for Jackie Gleason and Anthony Quinn and rapid fire antiquated slang to great comedic effect? It's velvet! Eh, who am I kidding... you porch climbers wouldn't know a good score if it dropped in your lap...
January 4, 2013
a fun parady of 30's gangster flick given weight by the awesome cast including edward g robinson.
July 6, 2012
Edward G. Robinson excels in slapstick comedy about inept thieves
½ April 8, 2012
Funny little caper movie, with Robinson in a humorous gangster role for a change. Woody Allen took the story from "Larceny, Inc". for his own film "Small Time Crooks". Quite entertaining.
April 7, 2012
great fun movie...makes me laugh everytime I see it. Thoroughly enjoyable
August 15, 2011
Recent ex-cons 'Pressure' Maxwell, Jug Martin and Weepy Davis (Edward G. Robinson, Broderick Crawford, Edward Brophy) buy a threadbare luggage store so they can tunnel into the bank next door. But even with construction on the street, business is so good they can't make progress.

Between the Christmas season, Pressure's scheming daughter Denny (Jane Wyman) and competing safecracker Leo Dexter (a young Anthony Quinn), the guys are feeling the pinch. Woody Allen (consciously or not) lifted the premise wholesale for his 2000 film "Small Time Crooks".

It's all as broad as a barn and maybe a little too long - even for 95 minutes. But there's loads of funny quips (doubtless from Laura & S.J. Perelman's play) and great character moments. Keep your eyes peeled for Jackie Gleason stealing scenes as a soda jerk!
½ May 9, 2011
Believe me...You guys will love this film. It has a great cast and the storyline is solid as a rock. It will have you laughing from start to finish...Enjoy!!!
July 2, 2010
The cast should read Edward G. Robinson, Jack Carson, Jane Wyman, Anthony Quinn, Harry Davenport & a small & early part by young Jackie Gleason. This is a very funny movie & Woody Allen even stole the idea for his "Small Time Crooks". Watch Edward G. wait on a customer & laugh your butt off!
June 25, 2010
Warner Brothers released this gangster comedy during World War II, but you wouldn't know it was made in 1942 because there are no servicemen in the crowds. Indeed, unlike "All Through the Night," there are no Nazi saboteurs lurking in the wings. As the studio that had the greatest success with mob movies, Warner Brothers was foremost, having released both "The Public Enemy" with James Cagney and "Little Caesar" with Edward G. Robinson in 1931. These qualified as the seminal gang pictures of the sound era. Eventually, Warners would lighten up on mobsters and Robinson wound up making crime comedies such as the incomparable "A Slight Case of Larceny" in 1938 and then later "Brother Orchid" in 1940. Once a tough guy with a smoking gun in his fist, Robinson no longer wielded a firearm when he made director Lloyd Bacon's "Larceny, Inc." Actually, this above-average, entertaining, but largely uneven gangster comedy would inadvertently provide him with another character that he would play over the years as he grew older and more distinguished looking. He was no longer a man with a gun in his hand. Instead, he was the leader of a gang with the guns in their hands. Mind you, in "Larceny, Inc." there are few guns to be seen. Robinson's co-star Anthony Quinn brandishes a pistol on several occasions, but our protagonist has a weapon more dangerous than any gun and it is his gift of gab. Sadly, after a promising start and a build-up in the middle, "Larceny, Inc." nosedives. Jack Carson and Jane Wyman are the romantically paired couple and we never learn what happens to them in the long run. Meanwhile, our heroes narrowly stay out of jail the second time. Broderick Crawford plays the muscle man and he gives the best performance as a numbskull who fractures his language and makes a fool of himself.

The source of all comedy is incongruity and "Larceny, Inc." has the incongruity. J. Chalmers 'Pressure' Maxwell (Edward G. Robinson of "The Hatchet Man") is the brains of his outfit. Jug Martin (Broderick Crawford of "Beau Geste") is his muscle. They get out of prison at the outset of the action and 'Pressure' talks the warden out of suit of clothes so he will look good. Pressure plans to rob a bank. He buys a luggage store near the bank and Martin digs a hole in the cellar so that they can break into the bank vault on the other side of the masonry. The humor that grows out of this situation is that Pressure makes a lot of dough selling luggage. In fact, he helps his fellow entrepreneurs who are having trouble with a contractor. The street in front of their respective businesses is being torn up and the contractor is dragging his heels on the project. Pressure steps in and persuades the contractor to complete the project. Presto, the contractor finishes the job and everybody celebrates Pressure's triumph. Meanwhile, Jug has a jack hammer in the basement tearing a huge hole in the floor while Pressure and Weepy Davis (Edward Brophy of "All Through the Night") try to run off customers so they can finish their tunnel to the bank. No longer has Pressure become the toast of the sidewalk than the bank officials pay him a visit and offer to buy his business. At the same time, Jeff Randolph (Jack Carson of "The Male Animal") is a luggage salesman who sells Weepy lots of luggage and he hits it off with Pressure's adopted daughter, Denny Costello (Jane Wyman of "Honeymoon for Three") and they become a couple. Together, Randolph and Costello drum him up more business. Initially, Pressure had planned to rob the bank. Now, he finds that going straight is going to make him more dough than knocking over a bank.

This house of cards collapses when the villainous Leo Dexter (Anthony Quinn of "City for Conquest") breaks out of prison after he learns what Pressure is up to and muscles in on their deal. Pressure had been thinking about letting the bank have the property when Leo shows up with a gun. Years earlier, Robinson would have been the man with a pistol in his fist, but he is the mastermind here. Later, he would reprise this role under different names, but he would play the mastermind of a fabulous robbery as in "Seven Thieves" (1960), "Grand Slam" (1967) and "The Biggest Bundle of Them All" (1968). Lloyd Bacon keeps the action humming in this 95-minute, black & white, mob comedy and the performances are first rate.
½ March 14, 2010
90/100. This is one of Edward G. Robinson?s best films and one of the best comedies of the 1940?s. The supporting cast is amazing, Edward Brophy, Anthony Quinn, Jack Carson and Harry Davenport are excellent, but it's Broderick Crawford that steals every scene he is in. Look for a very young Jackie Gleason as the soda jerk. The adapted screenplay by Everett Freeman and Edwin Gilbert from S.J. and Laura Perelman's play (The Night Before Christmas) is outstanding. It moves along briskly and there is never a dull moment. Funny situations, great dialogue and it is unique and different. I am very surprised this film is not better known, it's a fine classic.
½ January 22, 2010
In spite of what RT thinks, Humphrey Bogart is NOT in this movie. It is Edward G. Robinson. 90/100. This is one of Edward G. Robinson's best films and one of the best comedies of the 1940's. The supporting cast is amazing, Edward Brophy, Anthony Quinn, Jack Carson and Harry Davenport are excellent, but it's Broderick Crawford that steals every scene he is in. Look for a very young Jackie Gleason as the soda jerk. The adapted screenplay by Everett Freeman and Edwin Gilbert from S.J. and Laura Perelman's play (The Night Before Christmas) is outstanding. It moves along briskly and there is never a dull moment. Funny situations, great dialogue and it is unique and different. I am very surprised this film is not better known, it's a fine classic.
½ August 12, 2009
With Edward Robinson giving an excellent performance as the witty and smooth-talking lead, this pre-Caper genre film is full of fun and laughs!
May 16, 2009
A silvered tongue ex-con buys a leather shop next to a bank to arrange for an underground break in but due to his persuasive use of language he becomes a community leader.
½ February 14, 2009
The system wont let Robinson go straight either! A light hearted affair that works very very well. Quinn get's to be the heavy in this one, Bogie must of been filming something else that week.
½ November 20, 2008
Enjoyable gangster comedy with a great cast and a good script.
November 1, 2008
this movie heavily influenced woody allen's woefully underrated small time crooks which took the premise. anyway, this is a very funny film and highly enjoyable for crime/screwball comedy fans. eddie robinson is a great comedic talent; its a shame he didnt do it more often
October 31, 2008
I really enjoyed this movie, it was both interesting and fun to watch. It was a neat take of a crime/comedy. Would highly recommend.
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