Let the Right One In Reviews

  • Apr 12, 2021

    Amazing take on a vampire movie. Really enjoyable.

    Amazing take on a vampire movie. Really enjoyable.

  • Mar 16, 2021

    One of those movies where the good guys are also pretty bad, but it's okay. Very beautiful as well.

    One of those movies where the good guys are also pretty bad, but it's okay. Very beautiful as well.

  • Feb 24, 2021

    23.02.2021 ---------

    23.02.2021 ---------

  • Feb 22, 2021

    This was gripping, spooky, scary, romantic, great fun.

    This was gripping, spooky, scary, romantic, great fun.

  • Feb 21, 2021

    Such a great film. Unexpected, scary and fantastical but also very real and human. Love this one!

    Such a great film. Unexpected, scary and fantastical but also very real and human. Love this one!

  • Jan 31, 2021

    North Americans have seen more than their share of vampire movies, so we've come to expect the expected when another one premieres on the big screen. But leave it to the Swedes to break the long-set mould, with the haunting, yet placid Let the Right One In, Tomas Alfredson's theatrical take on a 2004 novel by fellow Swede John Ajvide Lindqvist, who also tackled the screenplay. The producers were intent on finding young actors who displayed chemistry onscreen, accurately casting two 13-year-old unknowns, Kare Hedebrant and Lina Leandersson. The former portrayed Oskar, a 12-year-old boy who spends his free time daydreaming of bloody retaliation on schoolyard bullies. Leandersson makes us forget that she's barely a teenager, with her role as a somewhat androgynous vampire named Eli, who has been "12, about" for the last 200 years. Eli and her "guardian" Hakan (Per Ragner) have just moved in next door to Oskar in a sombre apartment complex in the Stockholm suburb of Blackeberg, where Hakan is committed to murdering locals in order to salvage their blood so that Eli doesn't have to. Oskar leads a lonely exsistance, something he has in common with Eli, the two of whom converse at the nearby playground before eventually striking up an alliance and going "steady." Alfredson is sporadically loyal to Lindqvist's novel--which is set in the early-'80s--delivering an almost pederastic tone to the children's relationship, one that leaves my "Americanized" eyes awkward and uneasy at times. The film seems to climax during a disturbingly graceful pool scene that left me ecstaticly jolted, and lends some much-needed energy to its slow pace. John Soderqvist composed a melodic score for this film, light at times, dark at others, setting every tone of every scene, and delivered by the Slovak National Symphony Orchestra. In a year that saw massive attention and fascination for Hollywood's own vampire contribution, Twilight, Let the Right One In distanced itself from big-budget glamour and poised itself as an alternative, highlighting its foreign authenticity (it was filmed and set in Sweden, and comes sub-titled) at the risk of feeble international ticket sales. Unlike Twilight, Alfredson's film will not expand into a blockbuster franchise, or produce any teen-girl glee or even action figures for that matter, but it will leave you more satisfied than its exploited rival, I'm sure. Although this film's stars aren't even high school students yet, this is a very-adult movie, one that tangles with its own essence to trigger self-awareness in its audience. Mission accomplished. *This review was originally written in 2009.

    North Americans have seen more than their share of vampire movies, so we've come to expect the expected when another one premieres on the big screen. But leave it to the Swedes to break the long-set mould, with the haunting, yet placid Let the Right One In, Tomas Alfredson's theatrical take on a 2004 novel by fellow Swede John Ajvide Lindqvist, who also tackled the screenplay. The producers were intent on finding young actors who displayed chemistry onscreen, accurately casting two 13-year-old unknowns, Kare Hedebrant and Lina Leandersson. The former portrayed Oskar, a 12-year-old boy who spends his free time daydreaming of bloody retaliation on schoolyard bullies. Leandersson makes us forget that she's barely a teenager, with her role as a somewhat androgynous vampire named Eli, who has been "12, about" for the last 200 years. Eli and her "guardian" Hakan (Per Ragner) have just moved in next door to Oskar in a sombre apartment complex in the Stockholm suburb of Blackeberg, where Hakan is committed to murdering locals in order to salvage their blood so that Eli doesn't have to. Oskar leads a lonely exsistance, something he has in common with Eli, the two of whom converse at the nearby playground before eventually striking up an alliance and going "steady." Alfredson is sporadically loyal to Lindqvist's novel--which is set in the early-'80s--delivering an almost pederastic tone to the children's relationship, one that leaves my "Americanized" eyes awkward and uneasy at times. The film seems to climax during a disturbingly graceful pool scene that left me ecstaticly jolted, and lends some much-needed energy to its slow pace. John Soderqvist composed a melodic score for this film, light at times, dark at others, setting every tone of every scene, and delivered by the Slovak National Symphony Orchestra. In a year that saw massive attention and fascination for Hollywood's own vampire contribution, Twilight, Let the Right One In distanced itself from big-budget glamour and poised itself as an alternative, highlighting its foreign authenticity (it was filmed and set in Sweden, and comes sub-titled) at the risk of feeble international ticket sales. Unlike Twilight, Alfredson's film will not expand into a blockbuster franchise, or produce any teen-girl glee or even action figures for that matter, but it will leave you more satisfied than its exploited rival, I'm sure. Although this film's stars aren't even high school students yet, this is a very-adult movie, one that tangles with its own essence to trigger self-awareness in its audience. Mission accomplished. *This review was originally written in 2009.

  • Jan 12, 2021

    I like Shaun of the Dead as much as the next guy, but it seems in recent years that parodies or similar takes that take away the horror factor from classic monsters (like Twilight making vampires and werewolves into a teen heartthrob subplot). That's fine and all, but too much of those types of films takes away from the actual underlying principle - the horror. Let the Right One In is as much a romance and coming-of-age tale as it is a horror film, but it very importantly does not forget or marginalize the scares. Tightly shot and engaging, the film capitalizes on some great performances from young leads Hedebrant and Leandersson, as well as some great period set design to create a horror film that feels high-quality and doesn't resort to jumpscares, relying on atmosphere and tension as most good horror does. One modern horror flick destined to become a classic. (4/5)

    I like Shaun of the Dead as much as the next guy, but it seems in recent years that parodies or similar takes that take away the horror factor from classic monsters (like Twilight making vampires and werewolves into a teen heartthrob subplot). That's fine and all, but too much of those types of films takes away from the actual underlying principle - the horror. Let the Right One In is as much a romance and coming-of-age tale as it is a horror film, but it very importantly does not forget or marginalize the scares. Tightly shot and engaging, the film capitalizes on some great performances from young leads Hedebrant and Leandersson, as well as some great period set design to create a horror film that feels high-quality and doesn't resort to jumpscares, relying on atmosphere and tension as most good horror does. One modern horror flick destined to become a classic. (4/5)

  • Jan 01, 2021

    Beautiful! Sheer poetry.

    Beautiful! Sheer poetry.

  • Nov 22, 2020

    This was my second viewing of this film. It is a sad film. You know from the beginning that it will be violent. The two young actors were excellent. Ending is a real stopper.

    This was my second viewing of this film. It is a sad film. You know from the beginning that it will be violent. The two young actors were excellent. Ending is a real stopper.

  • Nov 10, 2020

    The dialogue was designed to be simplistic and surreal in some cases, I'm just not a personal fan of it stylistically, I found some of the acting to be cringe-worthy and awkward. But the faults are pretty much outdone by the positives. Brutal action scenes have their quality heightened due to their infrequency and the buildup leading to their occurrences. An excellent plot combined with a lot of unanswered questions make the film highly entertaining and memorable.

    The dialogue was designed to be simplistic and surreal in some cases, I'm just not a personal fan of it stylistically, I found some of the acting to be cringe-worthy and awkward. But the faults are pretty much outdone by the positives. Brutal action scenes have their quality heightened due to their infrequency and the buildup leading to their occurrences. An excellent plot combined with a lot of unanswered questions make the film highly entertaining and memorable.