Duck Soup Reviews

  • Dec 30, 2015

    same title as the marx brothers' 1933 pix but thats where it ends

    same title as the marx brothers' 1933 pix but thats where it ends

  • May 10, 2014

    Hilarious little two-reeler from the very early days of Laurel and Hardy, before their film personas were solidified. This was thought to be lost, but was found in the early 70's. It was remade by Laurel and Hardy as a talkie called "Another Fine Mess." The title for this one, "Duck Soup" was later used by Leo McCarey (a big Laurel and Hardy fan) for a feature film of the same name that you probably all know.

    Hilarious little two-reeler from the very early days of Laurel and Hardy, before their film personas were solidified. This was thought to be lost, but was found in the early 70's. It was remade by Laurel and Hardy as a talkie called "Another Fine Mess." The title for this one, "Duck Soup" was later used by Leo McCarey (a big Laurel and Hardy fan) for a feature film of the same name that you probably all know.

  • Jul 23, 2012

    Nothing unexpected but still typical L&H, an early silent one.

    Nothing unexpected but still typical L&H, an early silent one.

  • Aug 04, 2011

    It's 1927, and Hal Roach is still in the process of testing out to see what kind of comedians his popular pairing of Laurel and Hardy were going to be. At the start of this silent short, we catch a high-speed glimpse of a road not taken: some pretty exciting action-comedy - with the pair on the lam on a purloined bicycle - that's very nearly on a par with Keaton or Lloyd for comic thrills. This diversion negotiated, the stars revert to a persona that would be locked the minute the Depression hit: they're vagabonds, hiding out in a posh mansion house in what's patently a primitive (and now rather tatty-looking) first draft of what would become "Another Fine Mess", albeit with an alternative, somewhat thrown-together ending. The stars' destiny would lie elsewhere: becoming the Marx Brothers in bowler hats, accidental anarchists in respectable clothing.

    It's 1927, and Hal Roach is still in the process of testing out to see what kind of comedians his popular pairing of Laurel and Hardy were going to be. At the start of this silent short, we catch a high-speed glimpse of a road not taken: some pretty exciting action-comedy - with the pair on the lam on a purloined bicycle - that's very nearly on a par with Keaton or Lloyd for comic thrills. This diversion negotiated, the stars revert to a persona that would be locked the minute the Depression hit: they're vagabonds, hiding out in a posh mansion house in what's patently a primitive (and now rather tatty-looking) first draft of what would become "Another Fine Mess", albeit with an alternative, somewhat thrown-together ending. The stars' destiny would lie elsewhere: becoming the Marx Brothers in bowler hats, accidental anarchists in respectable clothing.