Summer (Le rayon vert) Reviews

  • Dec 16, 2020

    Después de bastante tiempo, la semana pasada volví a ver El rayo verde, una película de Eric Rohmer que relata la deriva de Delphine, una secretaria parisina de vacaciones (Marie Riviere) , por diferentes sitios de veraneo y que arrastra un desengaño amoroso que no puede superar. .......................................................................................................................................... Es increíble la lozanía que mantiene esta película de 1986 (forma parte del ciclo de Rohmer Comedias y Proverbios) , una referencia ineludible cuando se habla de películas sobre vacaciones (sobre todo de vacaciones en soledad) y de replanteos existenciales frente al mar o de almuerzos o meriendas con amigos o extraños en un jardín. Justamente la volví a recordar al ver Isabella, con sus ritos frente al Rio de la Plata y los paseos de una de sus protagonistas. ...................................................................................................................................... La naturalidad y sutileza de los diálogos (y sus ramalazos de humor), la irrupción de diferentes personajes de la nada, los cambiantes estados de ánimo de Delphine (que puede ser adorable o exasperante) de la mano de la maravillosa actuación de Marie Riviere, los climas que se van creando y un movimiento que no cesa en una película que transcurre casi enteramente en exteriores. Rohmer logra a través de Delphine una sorprendente unidad en una película de estructura episódica. ......................................................................................................................................... Todos estos, factores que configuran el universo rohmeriano. ...................................................................................................................................... Una película que nos depara uno de los finales más maravillosos y epifánicos de la historia del cine. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- After a long time, last week I saw again The Green Lightning, a film by Eric Rohmer that recounts the drift of Delphine, a Parisian secretary on vacation (Marie Riviere), through different places of summer and that drags a love disappointment that does not can overcome. The freshness that this 1986 film maintains is incredible (it is part of the Rohmer Comedies and Proverbs cycle), an unavoidable reference when talking about films about vacations (especially vacations in solitude) and existential rethinking in front of the sea or lunches or snacks with friends or strangers in a garden. The naturalness and subtlety of the dialogues (and their outbursts of humor), the emergence of different characters from nowhere, Delphine's changing moods (who can be adorable or infuriating) hand in hand with Marie Riviere's wonderful performance, the climates that are being created and a movement that does not stop in a film that takes place almost entirely outdoors. Rohmer achieves through Delphine a surprising unity in a film with an episodic structure. All these factors that make up the Rohmerian universe. A film that brings us one of the most wonderful and epiphanic endings in the history of cinema.

    Después de bastante tiempo, la semana pasada volví a ver El rayo verde, una película de Eric Rohmer que relata la deriva de Delphine, una secretaria parisina de vacaciones (Marie Riviere) , por diferentes sitios de veraneo y que arrastra un desengaño amoroso que no puede superar. .......................................................................................................................................... Es increíble la lozanía que mantiene esta película de 1986 (forma parte del ciclo de Rohmer Comedias y Proverbios) , una referencia ineludible cuando se habla de películas sobre vacaciones (sobre todo de vacaciones en soledad) y de replanteos existenciales frente al mar o de almuerzos o meriendas con amigos o extraños en un jardín. Justamente la volví a recordar al ver Isabella, con sus ritos frente al Rio de la Plata y los paseos de una de sus protagonistas. ...................................................................................................................................... La naturalidad y sutileza de los diálogos (y sus ramalazos de humor), la irrupción de diferentes personajes de la nada, los cambiantes estados de ánimo de Delphine (que puede ser adorable o exasperante) de la mano de la maravillosa actuación de Marie Riviere, los climas que se van creando y un movimiento que no cesa en una película que transcurre casi enteramente en exteriores. Rohmer logra a través de Delphine una sorprendente unidad en una película de estructura episódica. ......................................................................................................................................... Todos estos, factores que configuran el universo rohmeriano. ...................................................................................................................................... Una película que nos depara uno de los finales más maravillosos y epifánicos de la historia del cine. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- After a long time, last week I saw again The Green Lightning, a film by Eric Rohmer that recounts the drift of Delphine, a Parisian secretary on vacation (Marie Riviere), through different places of summer and that drags a love disappointment that does not can overcome. The freshness that this 1986 film maintains is incredible (it is part of the Rohmer Comedies and Proverbs cycle), an unavoidable reference when talking about films about vacations (especially vacations in solitude) and existential rethinking in front of the sea or lunches or snacks with friends or strangers in a garden. The naturalness and subtlety of the dialogues (and their outbursts of humor), the emergence of different characters from nowhere, Delphine's changing moods (who can be adorable or infuriating) hand in hand with Marie Riviere's wonderful performance, the climates that are being created and a movement that does not stop in a film that takes place almost entirely outdoors. Rohmer achieves through Delphine a surprising unity in a film with an episodic structure. All these factors that make up the Rohmerian universe. A film that brings us one of the most wonderful and epiphanic endings in the history of cinema.

  • Nov 30, 2020

    Blown away. Summer in a bottle.

    Blown away. Summer in a bottle.

  • Mar 11, 2017

    Eric Rohmer's films are unique. We observe French people talking about their lives and loves. Often they are confused about what to do. Here, he presents a sort of character study of Delphine (Marie Riviere, who apparently improvised enough of her part to warrant a screenwriting credit), a woman who is indecisive, even avoidant, when it comes to meeting men and starting a relationship. She is principled and wants things on her own terms but she is desperately lonely as a result and prone to crying. Yet the film is light-hearted and depicts Delphine's attempts to have a holiday (first in Cherbourg, then the Alps, then Biarritz). We meet other women who do not seem to have her problems, easily meeting men, or accepting them because of lower standards. The title invokes a proverb suggesting that when one witnesses the last green ray of the sunset (described by a group of older people Delphine eavesdrops on), then one will gain insight into one's own heart/purpose and that of others. The film is the fifth in Rohmer's Comedies and Proverbs series. Don't come looking for plot but instead be prepared for a wistful even frivolous look at those early days when life hadn't yet settled. Charmant.

    Eric Rohmer's films are unique. We observe French people talking about their lives and loves. Often they are confused about what to do. Here, he presents a sort of character study of Delphine (Marie Riviere, who apparently improvised enough of her part to warrant a screenwriting credit), a woman who is indecisive, even avoidant, when it comes to meeting men and starting a relationship. She is principled and wants things on her own terms but she is desperately lonely as a result and prone to crying. Yet the film is light-hearted and depicts Delphine's attempts to have a holiday (first in Cherbourg, then the Alps, then Biarritz). We meet other women who do not seem to have her problems, easily meeting men, or accepting them because of lower standards. The title invokes a proverb suggesting that when one witnesses the last green ray of the sunset (described by a group of older people Delphine eavesdrops on), then one will gain insight into one's own heart/purpose and that of others. The film is the fifth in Rohmer's Comedies and Proverbs series. Don't come looking for plot but instead be prepared for a wistful even frivolous look at those early days when life hadn't yet settled. Charmant.

  • Aug 18, 2015

    #5 in Rohmer's comedies & proverbs

    #5 in Rohmer's comedies & proverbs

  • Jun 10, 2014

    Top tier Rohmer. Maybe my favorite of them all. One of the best performances in all of cinema. Holy shit.

    Top tier Rohmer. Maybe my favorite of them all. One of the best performances in all of cinema. Holy shit.

  • Jan 02, 2013

    Perhaps the best in the series in that it has less introspective dialogue than the rest, though it still feels false to me.

    Perhaps the best in the series in that it has less introspective dialogue than the rest, though it still feels false to me.

  • Stella D Super Reviewer
    Sep 14, 2012

    this film was released in 1986 actually, and it's the rohmer film for folks who don't like rohmer much. i'm not his biggest fan but he certainly has a gift for making mundane conversations interesting and whiny characters sympathetic. very enjoyable

    this film was released in 1986 actually, and it's the rohmer film for folks who don't like rohmer much. i'm not his biggest fan but he certainly has a gift for making mundane conversations interesting and whiny characters sympathetic. very enjoyable

  • Jun 12, 2012

    A very brave and personal film. I loved everything about this french film, and it hit me on a personal level in some ways. It is a beautiful talkie film with great landscapes and scenery. We never feel like one takes over the other, and it truely is one of the most genuine pieces of work I've seen. I am now a Eric Rohmer fan. There needs to be more films like this.

    A very brave and personal film. I loved everything about this french film, and it hit me on a personal level in some ways. It is a beautiful talkie film with great landscapes and scenery. We never feel like one takes over the other, and it truely is one of the most genuine pieces of work I've seen. I am now a Eric Rohmer fan. There needs to be more films like this.

  • Mar 12, 2012

    El rayo verde [2002]

    El rayo verde [2002]

  • Sep 26, 2011

    Sounds like it should be some kind of Marvel superhero, but the title actually refers to both a Jules Verne novel and the last colour of light seen at a perfect sunset, romantic legends tells it's the moment a man and woman fully understand each other. Rohmer directs this film in a very easy-going, relaxed and natural style and well over two-thirds of the film follows a recently single Parisian 20something as she struggles to feel comfortable in her own skin as she tries to find a holiday destination to get out of the oppressive city. A walking contradiction, she both craves solitude, but not the loneliness that comes with it and company, but not the social niceties and singles game playing. It struck a real chord for me personally but I'm sure others would just want to give her a slap. It's not all depressing mooching about though, as Rohmer seems to throw her a lifeline at the end, with a lovely final shot that leaves the rest of her story to the audiences imagination.

    Sounds like it should be some kind of Marvel superhero, but the title actually refers to both a Jules Verne novel and the last colour of light seen at a perfect sunset, romantic legends tells it's the moment a man and woman fully understand each other. Rohmer directs this film in a very easy-going, relaxed and natural style and well over two-thirds of the film follows a recently single Parisian 20something as she struggles to feel comfortable in her own skin as she tries to find a holiday destination to get out of the oppressive city. A walking contradiction, she both craves solitude, but not the loneliness that comes with it and company, but not the social niceties and singles game playing. It struck a real chord for me personally but I'm sure others would just want to give her a slap. It's not all depressing mooching about though, as Rohmer seems to throw her a lifeline at the end, with a lovely final shot that leaves the rest of her story to the audiences imagination.