The Legend of Bagger Vance Reviews

Page 1 of 2
March 7, 2018
The real sparks are between Damon and the mischievously enigmatic Smith, who dispenses wisdom like a cross between Krishnamurti and Uncle Remus.
Top Critic
March 22, 2002
May 21, 2001
Another lusciously produced, emotionally clammy Redford enterprise -- forced, phony mythmaking filled with tinged sunsets and full moons.
May 8, 2001
April 16, 2001
Pretentious piffle.
January 1, 2000
It's so utterly vague and mystical -- or, to be unkind about it, so slow the movie itself seems to be suffering from a hardening of the arteries.
January 1, 2000
Why ... would someone of Redford's proven abilities waste his time on something this frivolous, this negligible -- this out of touch?
January 1, 2000
Redford is so fascinated with the mythical qualities of the novel's premise ... he doesn't realize how anemic the tale really is.
January 1, 2000
A knuckleheaded period piece anachronistically strewn with New Age platitudes.
January 1, 2000
Even if Bagger Vance weren't saddled with the year's most inept premise, Redford's direction would have destroyed it.
January 1, 2000
Supernatural is not much better than subhuman: Hollywood is still, in the year 2000, disinclined to let black actors play human beings.
January 1, 2000
Leaves an impression like dew on a fairway: pretty to look at, and very quickly gone.
January 1, 2000
A movie that speaks well and truly to essentials in the kind of unhurried terms that most modern movies don't even dare to espouse.
January 1, 2000
A lightweight, modestly engaging yarn.
January 1, 2000
For all the wood-paneled Southern opulence, manicured fairways, and glowingly golden sunsets on display, there's nary a whiff of anything that will stick to your ribs.
January 1, 2000
It should be noted that the movie works uncommonly well for what it is; what's aggravating is the lost opportunity.
January 1, 2000
Redford should have spent more time thinking about his characters than about the meaning of it all.
January 1, 2000
The principal characters, forced in the bright light of the fairway to work not just as allegory but as viable, identifiable human beings, become ludicrous.
January 1, 2000
The film's metaphorical message feels silly and pretentious, partly because every character is a stereotype, but particularly because it can't transcend its heroic tone.
January 1, 2000
Relies on a ritualized filmmaking style that leaches [Redford's] story of excitement.
Page 1 of 2